How install openmediavault on Ubuntu 14.10 or higher.

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    • How install openmediavault on Ubuntu 14.10 or higher.

      Hi, I am a faithful follower of the openmediavault tool, I think it's a great tool, I want to know how I can adapt to Ubuntu 14.10 or higher.
      Early versions of the tools were available in the repositories of "precise" ubuntu.
    • OMV has never been available on Ubuntu as far as I know and I was on the forums before the 0.2 release. As I said in the PM, I think this is a very difficult project due to the amount of code you will need to change. Once OMV is working with systemd and Ubuntu is using systemd, this task may be easier.
      omv 4.1.11 arrakis | 64 bit | 4.15 proxmox kernel | omvextrasorg 4.1.11
      omv-extras.org plugins source code and issue tracker - github

      Please read this before posting a question and this and this for docker questions.
      Please don't PM for support... Too many PMs!
    • Ubuntu is running systemd since 15.04 as far as I know.

      I too would like to have OMV on ubuntu due to default much newer kernel.. which has a lot of BTRFS improvements. And the fact that my Raidcard works out of the box with ubuntu. Yes I would like to run with raidcard (Areca) in JBOD mode since BTRFS can use the onboard cache in addition to Hdd Cache and thus speed up transfers.

      Ubuntu may be more "bleeding edge", but Debian is just plain way too slow when it comes to new kernels etc.
    • bug11 wrote:

      Ubuntu is running systemd since 15.04 as far as I know.

      16.04 is supposed to be the first version to use systemd by default.

      bug11 wrote:


      I too would like to have OMV on ubuntu due to default much newer kernel.. which has a lot of BTRFS improvements.

      OMV 3 will use Debian Jessie. The default kernel will be 3.16 but the backports kernel is 4.2. With Wheezy or Jessie, you can always compile your own newer kernel. There are multiple threads in this forum of people using newer, self-compiled kernels.

      bug11 wrote:

      Ubuntu may be more "bleeding edge", but Debian is just plain way too slow when it comes to new kernels etc.

      You mistake slow with stable... Debian is equivalent to Ubuntu LTS. If you look at the last Ubuntu LTS (14.04), it is using an older kernel than Jessie and Wheezy-backports. It would be unwise to run a non-LTS Ubuntu on a real server.
      omv 4.1.11 arrakis | 64 bit | 4.15 proxmox kernel | omvextrasorg 4.1.11
      omv-extras.org plugins source code and issue tracker - github

      Please read this before posting a question and this and this for docker questions.
      Please don't PM for support... Too many PMs!
    • Slow is stable, i agree. However it is not always the best, and not everyone wants or is capable of compiling their own kernel.

      ​And in the world of Linux, way too much exciting Things is happening at the moment, that is why I do stand behind the reason for using ubuntu.

      I have tried Rocksto​r, but the Docker system is just not working properly, nor is my raidcard.
    • bug11 wrote:

      not everyone wants or is capable of compiling their own kernel.

      If you went here, you could download a kernel that someone else compiled or follow the simple directions to compile your own.

      bug11 wrote:

      And in the world of Linux, way too much exciting Things is happening at the moment, that is why I do stand behind the reason for using ubuntu.

      You seem like you just want a newer kernel. What other "exciting" things are referring to?

      bug11 wrote:

      I have tried Rockstor, but the Docker system is just not working properly, nor is my raidcard.

      Once you have a newer kernel and your raidcard is working, the OMV docker-gui plugin would probably solve most of your other issues with slow Debian.
      omv 4.1.11 arrakis | 64 bit | 4.15 proxmox kernel | omvextrasorg 4.1.11
      omv-extras.org plugins source code and issue tracker - github

      Please read this before posting a question and this and this for docker questions.
      Please don't PM for support... Too many PMs!
    • (I do have to admit that i think newer software is always better )


      Then your totally wrong. Newer software does not mean its always better. I work in a branch, where I have seen many software migrations and
      changes to newer stuff and after that the problems started.

      Seen it from production side, its much much better to stick with a stable system. Once in a company they made an update of the antivirus software to
      a newer version and BANG 70% of the employees could not work any more because they had blue screens. And it was not the newest update they used.
    • I agree on all parts about not beeing too bleeding edge when it comes to production environments.

      My main reason for wantin a bit more bleeding edge than debian is support for newer HW in the kernel, and BTRFS with Raid.

      That is just my 2 cent. I have compiled a newer kernel and BTRFS is working pretty much like a charm, so just need to figure the auto find volumes on boot, then all is good with OMV
    • Which will happen probably soon. I dont know the road map but I think with the next bigger version change of OMV they
      implement more HW support. But I agree the hardware support must grow or the possibility of a db where I can download drivers during install.

      But as before, I rather go the save way with servers then be sorry of any loss or attack happens. On the other hand, btrfs is a young file system might be better for big volumes, fault tolerance, self data healing and more but performance wise its the same like ext4.

      And this feature for example is very important for me as I work with raids:
      Btrfs lacks the RAID-Z features of ZFS, so RAID is still in the experimental state with Btrfs. However, for pure data storage, Btrfs is the winner over ext4, but time will tell.

      delightlylinux.wordpress.com/2…-is-faster-btrfs-or-ext4/

      I am not going to use experimental stuff for my production servers :) But I think thats the same as you would do.
    • mutosan wrote:

      But I agree the hardware support must grow or the possibility of a db where I can download drivers during install.

      That is a Windows way of thinking. *Most* manufacturers put their drivers in the kernel. If not, they typically don't provide binary drivers either. I have yet to see a Linux distro that allows you compile and add a driver during the installation process. OMV 3 will allow the backports 4.3 kernel to be installed. If you are using something not supported by that kernel, it probably isn't supported well on Linux.
      omv 4.1.11 arrakis | 64 bit | 4.15 proxmox kernel | omvextrasorg 4.1.11
      omv-extras.org plugins source code and issue tracker - github

      Please read this before posting a question and this and this for docker questions.
      Please don't PM for support... Too many PMs!