auto sleep and wake up

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    • auto sleep and wake up

      I would like to ask: is in OMV option that after some time of inactivity the system or hdd goes to sleep or hibernate? And it wakes up not only by WOL magic packet, but also by just accessing some shared folder in samba or by viewing some html page in browser via apache? I have just installed clean last debian and this it inot working for me, not able to find any apropriate tutorial how to do this. So looking for another solution in the way of full NAS solution like OMV. Thank you.
    • The auto shutdown plugin performs some activity checks and can bring the server down. The wake up stage is not possible as you describe it, at least not in lan, server doesn't respond to Web or samba requests. You can bring the server up using WOL, which works either locally or remotely (wan)
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    • There is the Auto Shut Down plug in in OMV that allows the system to shut down, hibernate or suspend based on time of inactivity, network traffic, hdd activity or CPU usage. It offers quite a bunch of options to configure it and will probably solve half of your problem. Search in the forum, there are several threads regarding that topic.

      Other option is to use cronjobs with the rtcwake command (which is what I use). With this method you don't shut down your system based on activity, but at a specific time. In my case, I know that I am for many hours in the office, and during that time I don't need the server running. So, I configured a couple of cronjobs that keep the system suspended during several hours a day, and put the system online shortly before I get home. If the system is on for more than 1 hour without activity, I put the HDDs to sleep.

      If you want to wake up the system when you access a Samba share or opening a web page, it is possible to make but not straightforward. You need another device that sends a magic packet to the server to wake it up. That device might be your router (you need something running Tomato or WRT which support this function), another computer, or something like a Raspberry Pi (some people in the forum use this approach to control when their servers go online). I tried that way, and in the end I found that the hassle didn't worth it.

      However, if you ask me, the idea of having a server at home is availability. And if you are using low power hardware, having it 24/7 won't cost you a lot of money. If having 24/7 access to your files is your goal, keep the server on and simply make the drives spin down (some people will, however, recommend against it).
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    • I had a similar system before I got my OMV. Actually, mine might well be a re-branded version of yours (the similarities are way too obvious). Those systems are ARM based and do not hibernate. What they do is simply spin down the HDD, but the NAS runs constantly. When you try to access any of the services (FTP, media server, etc) the NAS simply spins up the HDD. The consumption of the CPU is marginal, and therefore it is left to run 24/7.

      OMV can do exactly the same: leave your system run 24/7 and let the HDDs spin down after some inactivity time.

      I am not familiar with the Synology systems, but I would check if what they do is spin down the HDDs or trully putting the whole system into suspension. If you are referring to the Synologys with ARM processors, I am almost sure that the NAS never suspends. It simply spins down the HDDs but the systems is always on because the power consumption is really really low. AFAIK, in order to wake up any system via LAN, you need some sort of magic packet. Accessing a Samba share is not enough to wake up a system.

      Custom mini-ITX build
      Coolcube Mini, Intel Desktop Board DQ77KB, Intel Celeron G1610T, 4 GB DDR3 Ram, 30 GB Sandisk SSDnow 200 (OS), 1 TB Samsung M8 HN-M101MBB

      Dell Optiplex 960 sff (deprecated) - link


      Dell Optiplex FX160 (repurposed) - link

      "If you can't find it in Google, it simply doesn't exist!" - The Internetz

      The post was edited 1 time, last by Eryan ().

    • In OMV you can set the HDDs to spin down after certain time. But whatever process that needs to access them (samba, plex, etc) will spin up the drives. That happens automatically. You can find those options under the "Physical disks" menu
      Custom mini-ITX build
      Coolcube Mini, Intel Desktop Board DQ77KB, Intel Celeron G1610T, 4 GB DDR3 Ram, 30 GB Sandisk SSDnow 200 (OS), 1 TB Samsung M8 HN-M101MBB

      Dell Optiplex 960 sff (deprecated) - link


      Dell Optiplex FX160 (repurposed) - link

      "If you can't find it in Google, it simply doesn't exist!" - The Internetz

    • @Eryan

      I'd like to use cronjobs with rctwake the way you said. Could you post an example of the command you used?

      My goal is to have different sleep and wake up times depending of the day of the week.
      Right now I'm thinking of having one cronjob for every day of the week, which seems like a hassle to administrate.
      Might there be a better way to solve it?
    • auto sleep and wake up

      @_hatze

      That is exactly the way I do it. If you want to wake/suspend the server at different times every day you need to set a cronjob for each day (that is what I do). You can follow the next lubk, there is a good explanation on how to use the command:

      howtogeek.com/121241/how-to-ma…from-sleep-automatically/
      Custom mini-ITX build
      Coolcube Mini, Intel Desktop Board DQ77KB, Intel Celeron G1610T, 4 GB DDR3 Ram, 30 GB Sandisk SSDnow 200 (OS), 1 TB Samsung M8 HN-M101MBB

      Dell Optiplex 960 sff (deprecated) - link


      Dell Optiplex FX160 (repurposed) - link

      "If you can't find it in Google, it simply doesn't exist!" - The Internetz