Externe Festplatte NAS Raid1 possible?

    • OMV 2.x
    • 1nvader wrote:

      why not? ZFS requires deep understanding
      ntfs works well in windows
      How many people killed their data with zfs. Maybe many?
      You're the only one talking about ZFS. Nobody here is suggesting that you should use ZFS.

      NTFS is for Windows. Linux uses ext4. MacOS uses HFS, etc... It's pretty essential to use a filesystem that matches the OS permissions system. This has no impact on your files. A beer remains a beer regardless of the brand of the refrigerator.
    • I still think you don't get what a NAS is.

      Even a plain EXT4-Drive can be attached to a Windows 10 machine and data can be copied from that drive to your data-drive in the Windows 10 machine. Simply boot a Live-Linux from an USB-thumbdrive.

      Is that your worst case scenario rescue anchor?

      You don't need to take out your drive from NAS! If drive is corrupted, use your backup. If data-disk on your Windows 10 machine is corrupted, leech the data from your NAS. You want reliability of NAS? Use a raid. You want to take data with you? Use external or Cloud-Service on your own NAS.

      phew, you are quite resistant to all suggestions ....
      Chaos is found in greatest abundance wherever order is being sought.
      It always defeats order, because it is better organized.
      Terry Pratchett

      The post was edited 2 times, last by riff-raff ().

    • I'm not it's just a bit overwhelming at the beginning. Im programmer and designer no serveradmin ^^

      I don't even understand that sentence:

      "Even a plain EXT4-Drive can be attached to a Windows 10 machine and data can be copied from that drive to your data-drive in the Windows 10 machine. Simply boot a Live-Linux from an USB-thumbdrive." Im just worried that their are to many filesystems and protocols involved that my orginaldata gets merged to something else. I don't trust most off the linux stuff at the moment ^^

      The post was edited 1 time, last by 1nvader ().

    • Windows can read and write NTFS, FAT, exFAT but no EXT4 and so on. Linux can read and write a whole bunch of filesystems. Since you are here in the offical OpenMediaVault-NAS-Forum, which is based on Debian linux, I suggest you intend to use a linux NAS. Therefore you should stick to the linux native filesystem (or at least of of 'em). NTFS is NOT one of them!

      You access the NAS through network, I think that was clear before I wrote it? ;o)

      We told you, to have a backup of your data from your NAS. Therefore you don't need to attach the NAS drive to your Windows machine in case your NAS drive crashes. You can restore to a new NAS drive from your backup. Since backups are usually done on an external drive with EXT4 filesystem, your Windows machine can not read the backup directly in worst case scenario, but you could simply boot a live linux from an USB thumbdrive on your Windows machine to access the data and copy it back to your data drive within your Windows machine. If you use a Raid, in case of a faulty harddive, your raid degrades and sends you an email to please put a new drive in so that it can rebuild. In the meanwhile you can still use your data on the NAS (thats called redundancy and availability). There is no need to access the drive on another machine by removing it from the raid-array, NAS or what-so-ever.
      Chaos is found in greatest abundance wherever order is being sought.
      It always defeats order, because it is better organized.
      Terry Pratchett

      The post was edited 1 time, last by riff-raff ().

    • And where do you think is your Nextcloud running when it is not your NAS? Well you could register a paid account with one of the Nextcloud hosters, but you have monthly fees and you still need to do backup jobs of your data.

      Edit: You are aware that the NAS is a separate piece of hardware from your Windows machine?
      Chaos is found in greatest abundance wherever order is being sought.
      It always defeats order, because it is better organized.
      Terry Pratchett
    • Sorry, but english is not my main language.

      Also ich denke die Diskussion sollte man ein wenig einschränken, da es hier große Verständnisprobleme gibt.

      1nvader will halt irgendwie seine Daten an 2 verschiedene Standorte plus Sicherung haben. Da Windows nunmal nur mit NTFS oder Fat oder exfat klar kommt, ergaben für ihn ZFS & Co überhaupt keinen Sinn - zumindest wenn nicht klar ist, mit welchen Konzept er an besten verfahren kann. Statt auf die Definition eines NAS und das ganze drum herum zu reiten, sollte man die Sachen abkürzen und erstmal erläutern, wie 1nvader an besten arbeiten kann.

      Nextcloud ist zwar ne nette Idee, aber am Punkt Internet happert es doch schon. In Deutschland gibst nunmal keine 100mbit Upload Leitungen für Lau, daher dürfte späteten beim Hochladen eines 10GB Filmes sehr schnell viel Frust aufkommen.

      Seine bisherige Idee von einen Mirror Raid pro Standort plus manuelles updaten mit einen 5. Laufwerk sind ja ganz nett, aber da reicht auch nen Windows mit ein passenden Syncro Programm dafür. Windows kann das sogar selber, wenn man weiß wie (Robocopy)

      Nur da er hauptsächlich Programmierer ist und kein PC Spezi, sollte man nun einschränken inwiefern welche Möglichkeiten für ihn noch offen stehen. Ganz ehrlich: OMV halte ich derzeit für nicht geeignet, da man wirklich schon relativ viel mit Linux beschäftigen musst. Das ist nix für Anfänger. Zumindest bist OMV 3.0 mal "Stable" wird *hust*.

      Um welche Datenmengen sprechen wir hier? Und wieviel Daten würden pro "Standort Transfer" miteinander synchronisiert und gebackuped werden müssen?
    • You are definitely confused.

      A NAS is a separate box that runs on your network, like a server, with no screen or keyboard. It's like a separate mini-PC that you hide under your desk or in the garage. You access it over your network, not over USB. You are not supposed to routinely remove drives and swap them between your workstation PC. Your Windows PC accesses the NAS as a network drive.

      NAS boxes generally run a flavor of Linux. OMV is an open-source NAS operating system based on Linux. It's typically made for people to make their own NAS. You can also buy ready-made NAS like Synology or QNAP etc... These are generally more expensive and run proprietary software.

      Nextcloud is software that typically runs on a NAS or a server, and turns it into a self-hosted cloud service, similar to Dropbox or OneCloud, but running on your own hardware. Nextcloud is open source and there are companies that offer hosting services, but those are really no different from using Dropbox or OneCloud. The point of Nextcloud is that you are in control because it runs on your own server.

      As for syncing, there are many simpler ways to sync data between your workstation and the NAS. Nextcloud is one. There is also syncthing. It's also necessary to know if you want to sync or if you want backup. Also, as a developer, you must use some sort of CMS. The NAS can be used as a repository for that.
    • I just use my solution for backup my work not for uploadiung 10s of GBs of Movies in my Cloud.

      I consider as a NAS a network attached storage. Anyway my ubuntu server is attached to the network, but I don't use that feature because the cloud doesen't support it. So I didn't consider it as a NAS. Is it one?


      @nibb31: Syncing simpler then in nextcloud? please lets dont talk about cms.
    • A Ubuntu server used for storage could definitely be considered a NAS, only you wouldn't be using a web UI for easy configuration, which is the main advantage of a NAS. You would have to do everything from the command line.

      What do you mean by "the cloud doesn't support it"?

      Nextcloud sync is easy to use, but not necessarily easy to install on the server. Something like syncthing or urbackup can be installed as a plugin in OMV in a few clicks.