The Class E Network

    • New

      geaves wrote:

      Rockstor use BTRFS they used it from the get go, it's still alive but their latest blog posts are Nov 17
      And just like mdadm RAID, BTRFS may work well, as long as it's on an UPS (where it won't lose sync of it's transactions).

      Having to have transaction ID's clean as whistle, defeats the entire concept of "Copy on Write" where a file change is copied complete to the hard drive before the older version is deleted. Given this behavior, even is there's a power outage, either the changed file is fully committed to the disk, or the original is untouched, thereby guaranteeing at least one uncorrupted copy of the file in question.

      This was the behavior I was looking for, in adopting BTRFS. "CoW" should make the file system resistance to power outages but, as it seems, Windows/NTFS does better with sudden power outages. It's strange, even odd, that a file system maintenance process can result in the entire file system going off line in a way that can't be retrieved.

      This brings back memories of tech projects, back in the day, and "requirements creep". If a project manager is not on the ball, a project can "evolve" into something that doesn't even satisfy the original requirement.
      Good backup takes the "drama" out of computing
      ____________________________________
      Primary: OMV 3.0.99, ThinkServer TS140, 12GB ECC, 32GB USB boot, 4TB+4TB zmirror, 3TB client backup.
      Backup: OMV 4.1.9, Acer RC-111, 4GB, 32GB USB boot, 3TB+3TB zmirror, 4TB Rsync'ed disk
      2nd Data Backup: OMV 3.0.99, R-PI 2B, 16GB boot, 4TB WD USB MyPassport - direct connect (no hub)

      The post was edited 1 time, last by flmaxey: edit ().

    • New

      It's time for a little "off topic" show and tell. :)

      This is what I meant about trim carpentry:

      All windows are new, maintenance free vinyl, intended for new construction. Here's an unfinished window, sitting in a rough opening.



      This is a "finished" window. The arrow points to the top stop strip, that's store bought. The rest I cut from dimensional lumber that wasn't intended for trim use. While it's time intensive, it saved a lot of money when compared to buying clean finished trim lumber. It's nothing fancy but, when trim work is involved, cuts have to be clean and tight measurements are required.


      This picture is dark, but I wanted the cabin to show up in the background. This is where I'd put you up, during a visit. Have you seen this movie ? -> Cabin in the Woods. It's a bit smaller, but just like that! (Just kidding. :) )
      While you can't see it, just on the other side of the cabin is a gurgling stream. The cabin, and the areas surrounding, are shaded from the sun during the heat of the day. It's a really nice setting, peaceful and restful. I'm actually looking forward to renovating it.
      ___________________________________


      Here's the flooring I mentioned earlier, as it's going in. It's a decent looking fake that's fairly easy to install. For reasons that don't make sense to me, pro-installers complained (in reviews) about it being to hard to install. I don't understand that, or exactly what it is that they would want..?? Sure, minding the details is important, but install this is much easier than real hard wood and it's reasonably forgiving of minor sub-floor variations. These days, it seems that builders want to "blink" install things, while still handing a homeowner an outlandish bill for the job.





      And so it goes. While there's plenty still left to do, it's getting there. Setting the decks aside (that's next year) the bulk of the work should be done in the next few weeks.
      Good backup takes the "drama" out of computing
      ____________________________________
      Primary: OMV 3.0.99, ThinkServer TS140, 12GB ECC, 32GB USB boot, 4TB+4TB zmirror, 3TB client backup.
      Backup: OMV 4.1.9, Acer RC-111, 4GB, 32GB USB boot, 3TB+3TB zmirror, 4TB Rsync'ed disk
      2nd Data Backup: OMV 3.0.99, R-PI 2B, 16GB boot, 4TB WD USB MyPassport - direct connect (no hub)
    • New

      Looking good, you deserve the 3D printer for all your hard work :D

      See the finished window for you is capable of having moulding because most US homes use SIP construction, that is obvious from your first picture without the moulding. In the UK homes are constructed using cavity wall, this is the standard method of house construction, they can use SIP's but in the UK they'll call this 'modular'.


      So the cavity wall is much wider, in fact our house from the external to the internal window opening is approx. 13" (you noticed I slipped in inches and not mm :) ) so internal moulding is not really possible as per the picture of my office window.


      That's why I like US home's, or at least the construction, the windows 'sit' inside the SIP allowing a moulding to be added, the external then has a vapour barrier added before the final finish, be it cladding, brick etc.

      The UK has always used cavity wall construction since the 1920 house boom it was introduced initially as damp prevention. A skilled bricklayer can lay up to 500-1000 bricks a day but that depends on the type of construction.

      Your flooring's looking good :thumbup: is the boss pleased :)
      _______________________________________________________________________

      I took a delivery for the couple over the road yesterday, came on a pallet so had to put it in the garage. Anyway wondered why he hadn't come over so I went to him, talking on the doorstep (as you do) he's taking next week off work to re do their en-suite, at which point the conversation went to 'we' as his wife appeared (in the UK we means the Royal we i.e. together). Well the look on Jo's face was a classic....she then chipped in with "Team ******" (****** that's their surname) will be busy next week re decorating the en-suite. By which time I'm cracked up...they have 4 children and next week is school half term so the kids will be at home :D :D
      Raid is not a backup! Would you go skydiving without a parachute?
    • New

      I seem to be getting my fair share of W10 machines to sort out recently, usually because of cumulative updates not installing correctly. I have a USB 2.0 to SATA bridge thingy, got it's own power supply and appropriate SATA cables, but I was wondering about getting one of those USB 3.0 to SATA connectors something like this one have you ever used anything like that?

      I know from here on the forum there are certain ones to stay clear of because of the chipset.
      Raid is not a backup! Would you go skydiving without a parachute?
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