Pinned Which energy efficient ARM platform to choose?

    • question, is the rock64 1GB sufficient for home use photos, home videos, and documents backup?

      also, like mentioned by tkaiser above, micro usb power is prone to undervoltage, how can I prevent this with rock64? nvm, just rechecked and rock64 is using barrel type connector power supply so that's a plus already, isnt'?
    • indragm wrote:

      is the rock64 1GB sufficient for home use photos, home videos, and documents backup?
      yes

      indragm wrote:

      so that's a plus already, isnt'?
      Yes
      omv 4.1.17 arrakis | 64 bit | 4.15 proxmox kernel | omvextrasorg 4.1.13
      omv-extras.org plugins source code and issue tracker - github

      Please read this before posting a question and this and this for docker questions.
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    • Hi! My Rock64 just arrived and I'm waiting for this to arrive as well. I have a 3tb 3.5 WD external drive that I want to attach to one of the usb 2.0 on the rock64 and I'm planning on getting a 4tb wd red to use with the Hd622 usb 3.0 to sata adapter linked before. My 3tb drive is formatted in NTFS and I have read that is not advisible using windows files systems on a linux system so I need to format it. But the drive is almost full so I first need to transfer the data to the 4tb drive that I will be formatting in ext4.

      My question is: what is the best way to transfer the data from the NTFS drive to the EXT4 drive?
    • Hello.

      I'm new to OMV and have set my server on a Odroid XU4 with Pihole, NextCloud and Transmission plugins.
      Performance is great and way above what I was expecting.

      Nevertheless, I'm always keen on experimenting.
      So I own a Voyo Vmac mini with an Intel N4200 and I'm wondering if that one would perform any better than the Odroid?
    • There is no should. Whatever works is OK. Most likely the most efficient way to copy the files would be if both HDDs are connected to the same Linux computer over SATA. But if you are not in a hurry then you can most likely do the transfer over the network or with one or both HDDs connected using USB. Even over USB 2.

      Linux computers can read and write windows filesystems. But it is much more difficult for a windows computer to read a Linux file system. It is like the Americans or British speaking a second language or not...

      But using a Linux file system on a Linux computer is much faster than using a windows file system.
      OMV 4, 5 x ODROID HC2, 2 x 12TB, 2 x 8 TB, 1 x 500 GB SSD, GbE, WiFi mesh
    • Adoby wrote:

      There is no should. Whatever works is OK. Most likely the most efficient way to copy the files would be if both HDDs are connected to the same Linux computer over SATA. But if you are not in a hurry then you can most likely do the transfer over the network or with one or both HDDs connected using USB. Even over USB 2.

      Linux computers can read and write windows filesystems. But it is much more difficult for a windows computer to read a Linux file system. It is like the Americans or British speaking a second language or not...

      But using a Linux file system on a Linux computer is much faster than using a windows file system.
      If speed is the only issue that means I don't really need to change the file system because that drive is going to be attached to a USB 2.0 port so that is going to be the bottleneck anyway. At least with the NTFS I have the flexibility to unplug the drive and use it with a windows machine if I need to. I was worried that the files could get corrupted if used with linux.
    • FabrizioMaurizio wrote:

      If speed is the only issue
      Speed isn't the only issue. Permissions can be an issue as well especially if you are using the drive for a service.

      FabrizioMaurizio wrote:

      I have the flexibility to unplug the drive and use it with a windows machine if I need to.
      I've never understood this need. Having a NAS means you shouldn't have to plug it in a Windows machine. But if your OMV system did fail, you could always boot a Linux rescue disk on the Windows box to access the files.
      omv 4.1.17 arrakis | 64 bit | 4.15 proxmox kernel | omvextrasorg 4.1.13
      omv-extras.org plugins source code and issue tracker - github

      Please read this before posting a question and this and this for docker questions.
      Please don't PM for support... Too many PMs!
    • The plan was to use the wd red as the "main" drive that never gets unplugged and the wd elements as a "secondary" drive that I can carry around if I need to. But this is my first Nas so I don't really know what the best practices are. Anyway, if you say I can run into issues then I will use a linux file system and leave the drive in a fixed position.
    • Hi,

      I'm planning buying an Nanopi M4 4Gb for OMV. I plan using OMV for smb sharing (I have 2 usb3 hdd), download manager and backup (Urbackup or Duplicati). Additionally I also plan to use the SBC for hostapd, tvheadend and home assistant. Is Nanopi M4 ok for this? does anyone recommend another SBC over Nanopi in the same price/energy consumption range?

      Regards,
    • nfgb wrote:

      Is Nanopi M4 ok for this?
      Sure, there's just one problem (or two) with this board: Prone to undervoltage and users not able to understand the difference between voltage drop and 'not enough current'. NanoPi M4 does not support USB PD (power delivery specs) and powering with 'dumb' 5V PSUs and the 'usual' (AKA insufficient) cabling between PSU and board results in malfunction in a lot of installations.

      forum.armbian.com/topic/7511-n…findComment&comment=68007

      Disclaimer: While I have 2 M4 I never tested wireless and especially not AP mode so no idea whether this works out of the box or with more than 2-3 clients.

      JohnStiles wrote:

      ODROID-H2?

      The rather expensive Gemini Lake thingy from Hardkernel? Or HC2?
    • tkaiser wrote:

      nfgb wrote:

      Is Nanopi M4 ok for this?
      Sure, there's just one problem (or two) with this board: Prone to undervoltage and users not able to understand the difference between voltage drop and 'not enough current'. NanoPi M4 does not support USB PD (power delivery specs) and powering with 'dumb' 5V PSUs and the 'usual' (AKA insufficient) cabling between PSU and board results in malfunction in a lot of installations.

      forum.armbian.com/topic/7511-n…findComment&comment=68007

      Disclaimer: While I have 2 M4 I never tested wireless and especially not AP mode so no idea whether this works out of the box or with more than 2-3 clients.

      JohnStiles wrote:

      ODROID-H2?
      The rather expensive Gemini Lake thingy from Hardkernel? Or HC2?
      Thanks for your advices, I think I'm gonna give up on the M4, what about MiniPC T4, it has a different PSU, does it suffer from the same problems?
      Hardkernel products seem to have good feedback from users, however HC2 has only one sata port and one usb2 port. Even if i connect the first HDD directly to the SATA port I would have to connect the second (usb3) HDD to the usb2 right?
      Regarding the H2 it is much more expensive and more power consuming since is not an arm board. If I was to go for a x86 I think I would reuse an old AMD E-350 mini PC which I don't use anymore (but I want to reduce power consumption to a minimum since it would be on for 24/7).
    • nfgb wrote:

      I think I'm gonna give up on the M4, what about MiniPC T4, it has a different PSU, does it suffer from the same problems?
      There is no problem other than potential users confusing A (amperage) with V (voltage). Once you are aware of the problem and act on accordingly there is no problem any more. You just need a SHORT cable with thick power wires between PSU and board. But M4 users buy a thick PSU with insanely high amperage ratings and use long and rather thin cables. It's not 'not enough amperage' but almost always 'crappy power cables'. Once you understand this you're done.

      If you order this cable friendlyarm.com/index.php?rout…ct/product&product_id=231 and combine it with a 2A/5.1V PSU you're already done (I did all my M4 NAS testing with exactly this setup). But users choose an expensive PSU with high amperage ratings and combine it with a long and crappy cable and the problems start.

      The M4 in my opinion is still the best NAS SBC thingy if you've already 3 or 4 USB3 disks around. If it's just two a few other RK3399 boards become also attractive, especially RockPi 4 and RockPro64.

      Wrt ODROID-H2 IMO the only interesting thing with this 'board' is the low idle consumption. Unfortunately Hardkernel is not able to provide definitive idle numbers (the 4W they claim are worthless unless they comment on whether they had no, one or even two displays connected). But right now Hardkernel's x86 knowledge/support is still in it's infancy so I would better study some threads/problems in their forum first prior to any buying decision.
    • tkaiser wrote:


      The rather expensive Gemini Lake thingy from Hardkernel? Or HC2?
      I was thinking about this new x86 which tries to pretend to be a real x86 PC under the banner of sbc.
      But as you can see, neither H2 nor HC2 are ideal for OP.

      Perhaps one day a new player will appear on the cpu market and introduce something as far as an alternative price and power consumption to replace ARM in sbc for good. Inserting Intel or AMD into the sbc format is such a bit of reinventing the wheel. Well, unless the costs do not play a role ...
    • tkaiser wrote:

      nfgb wrote:

      I think I'm gonna give up on the M4, what about MiniPC T4, it has a different PSU, does it suffer from the same problems?
      There is no problem other than potential users confusing A (amperage) with V (voltage). Once you are aware of the problem and act on accordingly there is no problem any more. You just need a SHORT cable with thick power wires between PSU and board. But M4 users buy a thick PSU with insanely high amperage ratings and use long and rather thin cables. It's not 'not enough amperage' but almost always 'crappy power cables'. Once you understand this you're done.

      If you order this cable friendlyarm.com/index.php?rout…ct/product&product_id=231 and combine it with a 2A/5.1V PSU you're already done (I did all my M4 NAS testing with exactly this setup). But users choose an expensive PSU with high amperage ratings and combine it with a long and crappy cable and the problems start.

      The M4 in my opinion is still the best NAS SBC thingy if you've already 3 or 4 USB3 disks around. If it's just two a few other RK3399 boards become also attractive, especially RockPi 4 and RockPro64.

      Wrt ODROID-H2 IMO the only interesting thing with this 'board' is the low idle consumption. Unfortunately Hardkernel is not able to provide definitive idle numbers (the 4W they claim are worthless unless they comment on whether they had no, one or even two displays connected). But right now Hardkernel's x86 knowledge/support is still in it's infancy so I would better study some threads/problems in their forum first prior to any buying decision.
      Are you sure 2A/5.1V PSU is enough because friendlyarm on the wiki mentions "Power Input : 5V/3A" and sells a 5V/4A for the M4 on their website. And I'm planning using all four usb ports and hostapd ...

      The post was edited 1 time, last by nfgb ().

    • [NanoPi M4]

      nfgb wrote:

      Are you sure 2A/5.1V PSU is enough
      Yes, I really know what I've written. See also forum.armbian.com/topic/8097-n…e-and-consumption-review/

      The RK3399 is somewhat energy efficient and with usual NAS workloads the board's consumption will not exceed 10W anyway. By specs each USB3 port has to provide up to 900mA each to connected USB peripherals (that's a whopping 3.6A or 18W for USB peripherals alone on top of what the board needs) and so it's understandable that 'power requirements' of a board with 4 USB3 ports exceed the board's own consumption.

      Again: looking at amperage ratings and ignoring the real problem (voltage drop on connectors and cables) will lead only to frustration. These SBC under load can result in a serious voltage drop and then this and that starts to behave strangely (especially when USB disks or internal USB hubs are part of the setup). Simple solution: start to understand that the cable between PSU and board matters more than the PSU's amperage rating. Get a good PSU providing stable 5.x V connected with a short cable and you're done. And of course use a PSU with slightly more than 2A but keep Ohm's law always in mind. If you really need a 4A PSU then the voltage drop will be enormous.

      So do not rely on the board to power external disks. This will increase overall consumption and if there's already a voltage drop problem chances of the whole setup failing rise dramatically.

      No idea if it will ever be sold but this nice SATA HAT at the bottom of this post will definitely solve all underpowering issues: forum.armbian.com/topic/8097-n…findComment&comment=62449
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