Suggestion for a new server\nas build

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    • Suggestion for a new server\nas build

      I would like to build a server\nas from scratch it doesn't need to be ultra powerful, actually I'm looking for the best bang for the buck, the server will be used mainly as backup server and nas to distribute files on a small office (5-6 employees)

      I was thinking about going the ryzen 3 way quad core, really cheap, I like the new amd line also I would like to support them, but I read that it's supported only from kernel 4.10 up is it right? so I guess it's not feasible because omv3 installs with 3.9.0 kernel and the backported one is 4.9.0, so do I need to assume a ryzen build with omv3\omv4 could go terribly wrong? does anyone have some ryzen config right now working fine?

      So with this out of the way, I assume, what would be a right choice for my needs to go with?

      Considering that going intel new gen is also out of the way...so I guess I have to go back in time, but I don't know what intel\amd model (and complimentary mobo to go with) could be a great config for my needs and my wallet right now.

      Any suggestion would be really helpful!!

      Other goals I would achive:

      • I would like to find a mobo that has more than 4 sata ports (or supports m2 ssd so I don't have to occupy a sata slot and leave them for all the data disks) I would like to have 4 or more sata ports for data disks
      • I would achieve the build with a small footprint so, anything on the range matx, even itx if it's possible (but I guess the second chance is a bit troublesome with my first point about sata numbers?!)
      • I would like a case with easy access to hard disks, without the need to disassemble the whole pc, just to change data hard disks, with hot swap could be awesome, I didn't find many of those to be honest, especially at a reasonable price

      The post was edited 2 times, last by Wek: added some more info ().

    • The two requirements that seem to be critical are "low cost" and "production environment". With those things noted, building a server yourself, on the cheap, may not be the best idea. When something is purpose built, server components are tested extensively "together". You get the benefit of someone else's work on the bench.
      ______________________________________

      I bought a Lenovo Think Server (TS 140) new from Amazon for about $250 delivered, an i3, with 8GB ECC, no OS and no hard drive. ((It was a special. They seem to have gone up a bit.)) I bought another 4GB stick of ECC on Ebay, for $20, for a total of 12GB. The TS 140 has easy physical accommodation for 3 drives, with a 4th drive possible, using a 2.5 or 3.5 to 5.25 adapter in an empty 5.25" bay. (No hot swap) It has 5 sata ports. On a side note for office use, this server is the quietest PC I've ever owned.

      Alternately, you can find deals for server refurb's, on Ebay, bargain basement. Here's an example -> Dell Server for under $170 delivered. 24GB ram, 2 each quad core Xeons (you can check here for the equivalent CPU speed CPU PassMark. It would have very good performance - far more than enough for OMV and 5 or 6 users.) Six sas/sata compatible 2.5" bays, that hot swap. 4 each GB Ethernet interfaces. There's nothing not to like.
      (My only reservation with the item in the link is, they don't supply drive trays. Since that's a brand specific item, that might be hard to find, I'd probably look for a like item that includes them.)


      Since you're looking for a server, for a business, I would go for a purpose built server versus building one.
      (That's just my opinion.)
      ________________________________________

      On your boot drive and using an M2 SSD.
      Realize that the only gain an SSD gives you, in a server environment, is the speed of boot up.
      With that said, OMV was built to be lean so boot times are fast using ANY media.
      (I'm booting from a USB 3.0 thumb drive and from power on to the availablity of the WEB GUI logon screen is about 45 seconds.) Second, how often does a server boot? Once a week, once a month?
      Third after OMV boots, with most of its processes loaded into and running from ram, the speed of the OS drive has nearly zero impact on server performance.
      Lastly, using a USB 3.0 port to boot saves a sata port for another data drive.

      In my case, I prefer USB drives because they're easy to clone and they're external to the box so, in the event of a failure (that has yet to happen), I can swap out the boot drive with a clone and be back up in, literally, a minute.
      (If you go this route, make sure you install the flash memory plugin.)

      Again these are just my thoughts.
      Good Luck.
      Good backup takes the "drama" out of computing
      ____________________________________
      OMV 3.0.88 Erasmus
      ThinkServer TS140, 12GB ECC / 32GB USB3.0
      4TB SG+4TB TS ZFS mirror/ 3TB TS

      OMV 3.0.81 Erasmus - Rsync'ed Backup Server
      R-PI 2 $29 / 16GB SD Card $8 / Real Time Clock $1.86
      4TB WD My Passport $119

      The post was edited 1 time, last by flmaxey: edit ().

    • flmaxey wrote:

      Alternately, you can find deals for server refurb's, on Ebay, bargain basement. Here's an example -> Dell Server for under $170 delivered. /--------------------/(My only reservation with the item in the link is, they don't supply drive trays. Since that's a brand specific item, that might be hard to find, I'd probably look for a like item that includes them.)
      I searched E-bay for "Dell PowerEdge 610 drive trays" and found plenty for $4 or $7 each. While it can add up, relatively speaking, that's nickles and dimes. The Dell R710 takes 3.5" drives, BTW. (Versus the R610 and 2.5" drives.) You'd also have to pop $11 or so for a DVD player, if you wanted one. You get the idea...
      Good backup takes the "drama" out of computing
      ____________________________________
      OMV 3.0.88 Erasmus
      ThinkServer TS140, 12GB ECC / 32GB USB3.0
      4TB SG+4TB TS ZFS mirror/ 3TB TS

      OMV 3.0.81 Erasmus - Rsync'ed Backup Server
      R-PI 2 $29 / 16GB SD Card $8 / Real Time Clock $1.86
      4TB WD My Passport $119
    • Really helpful @flmaxey one thing I understood...prices in the states are crazy cheap :°D, unfortunately I'm from europe and I cannot find any of that prices :°D, but I've got your suggestion I will look into it.

      The only reason I went for a m2 ssd, is because I don't want to occupy a sata port for the os, and I read lot of threads here that discourage to use usbs as system disk, I guess for reading\writing process wearing the usb fast as hell, moreover I have laying around some m2 ssd that I don't have use for, so that would be no problem.

      I dig alot that dell server you linked it's awesome I hope to find something similar here in my country
    • Wek wrote:

      The only reason I went for a m2 ssd, is because I don't want to occupy a sata port for the os, and I read lot of threads here that discourage to use usbs as system disk, I guess for reading\writing process wearing the usb fast as hell, moreover I have laying around some m2 ssd that I don't have use for, so that would be no problem.

      On booting from USB (or other flash devices) without the flashmemory plugin:

      Yep, you'd burn through the max number of a flash devices write cycles in a hurry. (Many of those threads you were reading from the time before the flashmemory plugin was available.)

      With the flashmemory plugin, where unnecessary writes to the boot drive are eliminated, USB drives last nicely. If they have wear leveling (the name brands do, San-Disk, PNY, etc.) and if they're somewhat large (16GB and up) they're going to do fine. On the other hand, any add-on server app that's installed on OMV should be forced to write to its' logs, metadata, etc., to a data disk, NOT the USB boot drive.

      In my ritual / routine:
      I configure OMV the way I want it, fully test it, etc. I clone the original USB drive (2x), where the original becomes the master. (It goes in a drawer and becomes a fall back if all else fails.) The two clones become the daily wear and tear drives. One may get package updates where I'll wait a few days, to be sure there are no ill effects, before updating the 2nd clone. That allows me to quickly and gracefully back out, if there's a problem.
      I've been doing this awhile now, without a failure. If there was a failure, I wouldn't be concerned because recovery takes, literally, a minute. Simply pull the failed drive and plug in a tested and working backup clone, which inserts into a port on the "outside" of the case. Easy.

      In any case, the Gen 10 you're looking at has 6 sata ports, 4 of which are usable for hard drives. I imagine you could find a way to plug your SSD as a boot drive, into one of the 2 unused ports, and tuck in there with a cable or something.
      Good backup takes the "drama" out of computing
      ____________________________________
      OMV 3.0.88 Erasmus
      ThinkServer TS140, 12GB ECC / 32GB USB3.0
      4TB SG+4TB TS ZFS mirror/ 3TB TS

      OMV 3.0.81 Erasmus - Rsync'ed Backup Server
      R-PI 2 $29 / 16GB SD Card $8 / Real Time Clock $1.86
      4TB WD My Passport $119

      The post was edited 1 time, last by flmaxey: edit ().

    • Actually is even better I found one so I went ahead and configured it, I'm testing it right now, it has an internal sata port as well so I connected the ssd on the internal one (the one that you should use for the dvd) so I have 4 bays to play with data nice!!
      more than enough for the SOHO.

      Your suggestion about usbs are good I will try to play them with my server at home, unfortunately I need to deploy this in a SOHO outside my town, so the manual switching thing is a no go, for this project.
      Indeed I will try on my play\test server :)
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