Is it possible to install OMV to an M.2 PCIe SSD and run it from this SSD?

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    • Is it possible to install OMV to an M.2 PCIe SSD and run it from this SSD?

      Hello,

      I've been Googling for a while, but I can't seem to find a clear answer to the question: can OMV (3/4) be installed to an M.2 PCIe SSD and does it run properly?
      I prefer an SSD over USB flash drives (/paranoid/), but don't want to waste a SATA port if I have an unused M.2 slot.

      SSD = Intel 600p series (PCIe 3.0 x4 NVMe)
      Motherboard = Asrock B250M-HDV

      According to the specs of the motherboard, NVMe SSD boot disks are supported.

      Before I start buying hardware.... has anyone tried this? Is it supported by OMV?
      Suggestions and thoughts are very welcome.

      Thanks!
    • Gulliver wrote:

      I have an unused M.2 slot

      Which can hold both PCIe/NVMe SSDs but also provides SATA. In case it's not only about burning money for no reason and you really believe you need an SSD I would go with the smallest/slowest/cheapest M.2 SATA SSD from either Crucial, Intel, Samsung or Transcend (since those all have temperature and 'wear out indicator' availables via SMART) or if you are sure your board can boot a Debian 8 or 9 via NVMe then burn more money and go with a NVMe SSD (please be aware that you should monitor the temperature and prepare heatsinks or even a fan if you choose a really performant one).

      OMV's own requirements for a 'boot drive' are almost none so it's a waste of resources anyway :)

      The post was edited 1 time, last by tkaiser: Changed 'M.2 SSD' to 'M.2 SATA SSD' ().

    • Thanks for the feedback tkaiser, but I think you're missing the point here.
      All I would like to know is whether or not OMV can be installed to and ran from such an SSD.
      Costs (not extreme, $70) and heat development (negligible in a simple home server) are irrelevant at this point.

      FYI: using an M.2 SATA SSD automatically disables one of the regular SATA ports, so that's not an option either.

      tkaiser wrote:

      or if you are sure your board can boot a Debian 8 or 9 via NVMe
      ...if I would know this, I wouldn't have started this post, right? :whistling:
    • Gulliver wrote:

      ...if I would know this, I wouldn't have started this post, right?
      Well, you're maybe asking in the wrong place then. OMV doesn't boot (that's the underlying kernel/bootloader Debian relies on) and has only indirect hardware requirements. So the question is whether 'your board can boot a Debian 8 or 9 via NVMe'. Maybe someone knows here.

      Gulliver wrote:

      heat development (negligible in a simple home server)
      Hmm.... I found it a bit scary to install recently an M.2 SSD that started to cook itself at 80°C with light loads. Now it's serving somewhere else with huge heatsinks applies and some ventilation and remains below 50°C in idle (still waiting for a firmware update that corrects heat development)
    • Gulliver wrote:

      I take it you don't have the answers to my questions, right?

      Obviously. Though I had some hope that you start to understand that your question is not related to OMV at all but only deals with
      • your board's BIOS/UEFI implementation
      • bootloader stuff (GRUB, systemd-boot, whatever you want to use)
      • maybe even kernel stuff (NVMe support is there since quite a long time but you never know)
      And I only answered to get the OMV part right: No SSD needed, especially not a fast one. OMV's flashmemory plugin combined with an USB thumb drive of appropriate size (the larger the better to reduce wear out) flashed with Etcher and tested with either F3 or H2testw prior to usage is perfectly fine. I prefer USB3 products connected to USB2 ports for these use cases (same with ESXi). Usually those USB2 ports are on every mainboard on pin headers...

      The post was edited 1 time, last by tkaiser ().

    • @ness1602: thanks!
      Do you experience any overheating issues with your NVMe drive, like tkaiser mentioned?

      tkaiser wrote:

      Hmm.... I found it a bit scary to install recently an M.2 SSD that started to cook itself at 80°C with light loads. Now it's serving somewhere else with huge heatsinks applies and some ventilation and remains below 50°C in idle (still waiting for a firmware update that corrects heat development)
    • jollyrogr wrote:

      Smartctl is a Linux issue, not NVME
      Huh? 'Everything outdated like hell' is a Debian issue :)

      'Smartmontools supports NVMe starting from version 6.5' (and I found building smartmontools from source pretty straight-forward)

      Anyway, I'm always surprised that technology is chosen in an area where there's no advantages at all but only disadvantages. NVMe SSDs are great as ZFS/ZIL cache devices for example but as OMV system drive? There's no performance gain while using the flashmemory plugin (with an hourly cronjob syncing changes back to disk) is still a good idea. And when there's not even SMART available then there are really only disadvantages (more complex installation and maybe hassles in case the system has to be set up from scratch / desaster recovery).

      The post was edited 1 time, last by tkaiser ().

    • I'll have to check...but I don't think smartctl is working on my Arch box nvme either... Current version there is 6.6-1

      I do see your point, but if I'm already running the nvme, no reason to switch it up now, right? From my perspective, OMV is pretty simple to setup, so if I had to redo the box from scratch, that's not a scary proposition. I can see where using USB drives would make it super simple to create system drive backups and swap drives if there was a problem.