Combinating RAID1 and normal storage possible?

    • OMV 3.x

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    • Combinating RAID1 and normal storage possible?

      Hi,

      I'd like to DIY build a 4 bay NAS running OMV to replace my readynas.

      Since I have a bunch of family photos that I don't want to lose, I would like to store them in a RAID1 with 2 disks.
      The less important things like movies and music, I'd like to store on a third disk with the possibility to add a second disk to increase storage.

      Is a combination possible and how can I set this up?

      I'm a newbie with limited linux experience, so don't get to technical on me.

      Thanks
    • RAID is not for backup. It only allows you to keep on working when a drive fails, which is not a priority for most home users.
      RAID is a real-time mirror, so if something happens to your files (accidental deletion, corruption, malware, etc...) then it is instantly replicated to both drives.

      What you want is backup. This can be achieved with two disks, by replicating the content on a regular basis.

      Anyway, you can set up your storage any way you like in OMV.
    • Nibb31 wrote:

      RAID is a real-time mirror, so if something happens to your files (accidental deletion, corruption, malware, etc...) then it is instantly replicated to both drives.
      Just to add some more confusion and not trying to address what @hrc450 really wants (backup instead of RAID)...

      With btrfs' own RAID-1 mode and by creating snapshots automatically and running scrubs automatically the above threats ('accidental deletion, corruption, malware') can be addressed somehow. The RAID-1 mode combined with checksumming allows for self-healing in case data got corrupted on disk, the snapshots protect for 'software and user originated failure' and what many people don't know: btrfs' own RAID-1 mode allows to add a bunch of disks even of different size still only wasting half of the capacity for redundancy.

      Btrfs does things differently with RAID-1 and more than two disks compared to most if not all other mirror solutions. With btrfs at least two redundant copies of data are stored on at least two different disks. Use three 1TB disks, put a btrfs RAID-1 on it and you end up with double redundancy and 1.5 TB usable. Do this with the other mirror approaches and you end up with triple redundancy but only 1 TB usable.

      But obviously all of the above doesn't provide real data protection or any sort of prevention wrt hardware related failure. Simply set your NAS on fire and you know why. Two or more disks in the same enclosure might generate some redundancy but not sufficient redundancy when looking at the whole picture and wanting data protection. An off-site copy is needed for important data (easily done with modern attempts like btrfs since snapshots can be transferred in the lightest way possible with 'btrfs send|receive').

      Of course all of the above applies to ZFS too except the way mirroring is working with more than 2 disk devices.
    • I would use the old NAS as backup in a remote location (garage).

      I guess the best way to get the feel of working with OMV is to set up an old PC and work with it a bit.
      I guess I'm just a bit scared to make the jump and steer away from a of the shelf system like Synology.

      thanks
    • hrc450 wrote:

      I would use the old NAS as backup in a remote location (garage)
      Very good idea but then you don't need to think about RAID-1 anyway? At least not when you wanted to use RAID to avoid data losses. :)

      I would walk my first steps not on really old hardware but better on a virtual machine these days (Virtualbox or the like) to get a feeling for OMV. It's not complicated anyway, just flash/install the image and then do everything via a browser.
    • hrc450 wrote:

      I guess the best way to get the feel of working with OMV is to set up an old PC and work with it a bit.


      I guess I'm just a bit scared to make the jump and steer away from a of the shelf system like Synology.
      A VM in Virtualbox (or something similar) as suggested by @tkaiser is the most flexible route. Build an OMV VM - clone it or snapshot it. Then configure it, try to break it, reconfigure it, etc. With a VM and using clones or reverting with snapshots, even the time necessary to rebuild is eliminated (about 15 minutes). VM's are great test platforms.

      On the other hand, there's nothing wrong with using a USB drive to boot OMV and an old PC with its' existing hard drive used as a data drive. Whatever you're comfortable with.

      As far as Synology goes, once you become familiar with OMV, I doubt you'd look back. (And depending on the Synology device you have, it might be reconfigurable for OMV once you're comfortable with it. Search the forum.)

      After testing OMV a bit, I walked away from Windows Server because, well, it's just too limited. Beyond basic file and print services, there are more value added plug-ins, add-on's, Dockers and advanced file systems available in OMV than Windows server (or a Synology NAS) will ever have.

      Further, support here is far more responsive to the end user than Microsoft or Synology could ever supply.
      Good backup takes the "drama" out of computing
      ____________________________________
      Primary: OMV 3.0.99, ThinkServer TS140, 12GB ECC, 32GB USB boot, 4TB+4TB zmirror, 3TB client backup.
      Backup: OMV 4.1.9, Acer RC-111, 4GB, 32GB USB boot, 3TB+3TB zmirror, 4TB Rsync'ed disk
      2nd Data Backup: OMV 3.0.99, R-PI 2B, 16GB boot, 4TB WD USB MyPassport - direct connect (no hub)