Is laptop a good option?

    • Is laptop a good option?

      I have a 5 year old laptop with i7-3537U CPU @ 2.00 GHz with 8 GB RAM. I plan to connect 2x 4TB externally powered HDD via USB 3.0. Do you think it's powerful enough to handle OMV? Also is there a way to test the stability of this setup once OMV is installed? I have spare HDD lying around to test without touching my 4TBs.
    • Dropkick Murphy wrote:

      OMV itself does not need any "power". Depends on what are your ideas in using it for...encoding needs more power than pure smb-sharing...and so on...
      Thanks. Right now the aim is to move my SMB server off a Asus RT-AC68U router to a separate NAS. I'll see if it can be used as a Plex server but it's not a major requirement.

      How about reliability? Is it okay to use external HDD?

      Sent from my Pixel using Tapatalk
    • OMV runs well on numerous ARM platforms, most of which are weak when compared to the Intel i series . If it's for home use, your laptop should be fine. For test purposes, try installing OMV to a USB drive. And it's not a bad idea to boot from a USB drive, if you add the flashmemory plugin when you're done configuring OMV. (You may have to enable USB booting in BIOS.)

      Stay away from RAID, however. RAID arrays on USB connected drives can do "odd" things. I'm not saying it won't work but it may not be "stone reliable". Do so at your own risk.

      Video Guides :!: New User Guide :!: Docker Guides :!: Pi-hole in Docker
      Good backup takes the "drama" out of computing.
      ____________________________________
      Primary: OMV 3.0.99, ThinkServer TS140, 12GB ECC, 32GB USB boot, 4TB+4TB zmirror, 3TB client backup.
      OMV 4.1.13, Intel Server SC5650HCBRP, 32GB ECC, 16GB USB boot, UnionFS+SNAPRAID
      Backup: OMV 4.1.9, Acer RC-111, 4GB, 32GB USB boot, 3TB+3TB zmirror, 4TB Rsync'ed disk
    • utamav wrote:

      Thanks all. I have been running it on my laptop for about a week without issues. I am just using SMB share and rsync. Though I would like to move to a better hardware soon, I'm keeping an eye on colleges replacing old PCs.
      Colleges are a great place to find hardware. I buy parts from a couple university property centers via their Ebay store fronts. If you are on a budget, consider some of the volume hardware liquidators, many of whom have Ebay store fronts as well. I buy/build machines for an educational non-profit, and obtain most of their equipment that way. I can often find new, but recently obsolete, systems/parts at heavily discounted prices. For OMV, and Linux/BSD in general, this has the advantages of still having its full lifespan while having been around long enough any OS issues are already fixed or well documented.
      Working with computers since the days when unboxing and set-up required 3 weeks with a soldering iron!
    • To get an idea of the performance to expect, look up CPU's here. Passmark.

      In servers with some age (not too old) sas ports will work with sata drives. Many of the "purpose built" servers are set up for 2.5" drives. It would be better to find one that takes 3.5" drives, as the larger drives tend to be lower in cost. When I was considering going this route, I looked for items that wouldn't require anything extra other than new data storage drives.

      What to comes down to is, what your budget is versus what you want.
      Commercial servers are wide and deep and tend to have noisy power supplies so, in the closet or basement they go.

      The following is offered not as a recommendation, just something to look at
      -> server. $160 with 24GB, free shipping.

      - 2.5" drives only (not good - higher cost)
      - No optical drive (no big deal - a USB DVD/CD drive would get the OS loading job done.)
      - I'd boot the OS with a USB drive in any case.
      - Would need drive caddies (extra cost - another Ebay item at just under $4.00 ea, free shipping)
      - No front bezel (There's no bezel to speak of on this model - would be hiding it anyway.)
      - Passmark on the 2ea Xeon's - roughly 8800
      - P410 drive controller speed is bit slower 6GB sas / 3gb sata, due to older tech. However, the sas controller should handle several drives better than modern sata - good bandwidth.

      Just thoughts on the way I looked at used servers. Good Luck.

      Video Guides :!: New User Guide :!: Docker Guides :!: Pi-hole in Docker
      Good backup takes the "drama" out of computing.
      ____________________________________
      Primary: OMV 3.0.99, ThinkServer TS140, 12GB ECC, 32GB USB boot, 4TB+4TB zmirror, 3TB client backup.
      OMV 4.1.13, Intel Server SC5650HCBRP, 32GB ECC, 16GB USB boot, UnionFS+SNAPRAID
      Backup: OMV 4.1.9, Acer RC-111, 4GB, 32GB USB boot, 3TB+3TB zmirror, 4TB Rsync'ed disk
    • utamav wrote:

      Markess wrote:

      I buy parts from a couple university property centers via their Ebay store fronts
      Care to share some links? I tried some local universities but none of them anything to offer at this time.
      Here are some vendors I've used. Since I'm in California, all are from the U.S. Ebay site. I'm not necessarily advocating them. These are just vendors I've bought from. Because I tend to assemble systems, there's more selection for components than systems for sale. Your mileage may vary.

      ebay.com/usr/usderc (University of San Diego Equipment Recovery. Mostly used items)

      ebay.com/usr/kalleyomalley (Also does business on the internet as OEMXS. New and used components & some systems, along with consumer items. They are a volume Intel liquidator, but are unaffiliated with Intel. They take "offers" on most Ebay listings)

      ebay.com/usr/svcstore (equipment reseller/liquidator, new and used)

      ebay.com/usr/digitalmind2000 (used and new, both components and off lease system resale)

      ebay.com/usr/greencitizen (mostly used, both components and off lease system resale)

      ebay.com/usr/ganserscientific (mostly used, both components and off lease system resale)

      With the increased awareness on data security lately, many vendors/institutions now pull hard drives from systems and destroy them prior to resale, rather than taking the time to wipe them. So, you will find a lot of listings for off lease, out of service systems with no hard disks. For OMV, this may not be as much an issue, since you don't need an OS "key" and you may want to supply your own disks. However, since these systems have no disks, they are often listed as "for parts" or "barebones" rather than "used" (or "new" if they are liquidation) on resale sites like EBay.

      If you plan to use Plex or other CPU intensive plugins, a used server, as outlined by @flmaxey above, is a cost effective choice. At the other end of the CPU power spectrum, there's users on the forum that have/still use repurposed Thin Clients for OMV (i used to myself). There's many that can be had new for under $50. But, they aren't a good choice if you need a lot of disks and/or room for expansion, or aren't willing to tinker a bit with the hardware to set it all up. Exmple Thin Client

      The good news about it is that OMV works with such a broad choice of hardware!
      Working with computers since the days when unboxing and set-up required 3 weeks with a soldering iron!

      The post was edited 1 time, last by Markess ().

    • On the performance end of it, transcoding always seems to come into the question. If you don't watch 1080p on a smart phone or tablet (at home, why not use a big screen?), the requirements for a server come way down. Even if transcoding is a requirement, it can be done with a utility like HandBrake, in advance of actually streaming to the device. In native format, streaming media doesn't require a hot CPU. That type of streaming (native format) is like a very slow network file copy. Slow hardware can do it.
      ______________________________

      If cost is the concern and you're looking at file server operations, and maybe one media server add-on, a Rock64 might work for you.

      Take a look at this comparison.
      For reference, an Udoo AP is actually a full out PC with an Intel Celeron, on a small board, and it's not what I would characterize as, "cost effective". In this file copy test, the Rock64 is running neck to neck with the Udoo and it can be had with 4GB RAM for under $50. I'm giving serious thought to dumping the R-PI I'm using as a Backup File Server and replacing it with the Rock64.

      Note that this is not an endorsement, just food for thought. It all boils down to your requirements.

      On the other hand, there's nothing wrong with using your laptop with a big external drive. (Or boot it with a USB thumb drive and upgrade the internal 2.5" drive.)

      Video Guides :!: New User Guide :!: Docker Guides :!: Pi-hole in Docker
      Good backup takes the "drama" out of computing.
      ____________________________________
      Primary: OMV 3.0.99, ThinkServer TS140, 12GB ECC, 32GB USB boot, 4TB+4TB zmirror, 3TB client backup.
      OMV 4.1.13, Intel Server SC5650HCBRP, 32GB ECC, 16GB USB boot, UnionFS+SNAPRAID
      Backup: OMV 4.1.9, Acer RC-111, 4GB, 32GB USB boot, 3TB+3TB zmirror, 4TB Rsync'ed disk
    • My main concern was that the laptop aren't not built for 24/7 operation. I've been pleasantly surprised with the stability of my 5 year laptop. It seems to be serving my purpose but I would eventually like to get/build a server meant to be run 24/7. Thanks to you all, I know of plenty of ways to make it happen with my budget.

      I also didn't know that transcoding is only needed for mobile devices. So that reduces another burden because I mainly use Plex on my TV.

      That being said, I am currently looking at a Dell T30. I have seen it drop down to ~$260 in the past. I've setup a notification for it when the price dips again. In the meanwhile if I get a better deal on a used server, I might snag it. I will grow my drives later on. Currently I am using 2x 4TB external drive.