NAS Hardware refresh

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    • NAS Hardware refresh

      Hi guys,
      I need to refresh my OMV hardware. I´ve no complains about it doing the usual stuff, like using it as a server to store files, using it for streaming to a tv, until now it perform very well.

      The point is i would like to use it for another purpose, run virtual machines in it, like one or two at a most, and for that i think my hardware is not very suitable for that.

      My setup is:

      Intel Celeron G1820 @ 2.70
      8GB of RAM
      Motherboard H87I-PLUS

      What is your opinion? Should i refresh it entirely, change the cpu?

      Thanks!!!
    • It very much depends on the the types of VM's you plan to run. Will they be Windows desktop VM's or Linux - command line? Also, what would you be planning to do with them? (For example, I have one client with 12GB and a CPU with a passmark of 8021. That's way over spec'ed but I like the clients performance.)

      Your CPU's passmark is 2769. Check CPU's here -> Passmark. If you're planning to run anything with a desktop (Win7?), alongside of OMV in a VM, I'd be looking for a CPU in the 4000+ area. With two desktops running concurrently with OMV, tack on 2000 more for something in in the 6000+ range. What your performance expectations would be for the VM's, and what you're planning to do with them, would have a bearing on the CPU needed.

      For VM's, memory is a cumulative requirement. You'd need to figure how much each guest would need and add that to what you want to dedicate to OMV. If you need 8GB for OMV (as currently configured), + 4GB for HOST A, and 4GB for HOST B. You'd need to add 8GB more to your current rig, for 16GB total.
      ________________________________________

      Essentially, the performance picture would boil down to spec'ing out a CPU with enough power to run three machines simultaneously, if that's how you plan to run it (check cpu and ram requirements for each OS). Linux, even a desktop edition, would not be the resource hog that any version of Windows would be. Then, provision enough dedicated Ram for OMV and each VM separately.
      Good backup takes the "drama" out of computing
      ____________________________________
      Primary: OMV 3.0.99, ThinkServer TS140, 12GB ECC, 32GB USB boot, 4TB+4TB zmirror, 3TB client backup.
      Backup: OMV 4.1.9, Acer RC-111, 4GB, 32GB USB boot, 3TB+3TB zmirror, 4TB Rsync'ed disk
      2nd Data Backup: OMV 3.0.99, R-PI 2B, 16GB boot, 4TB WD USB MyPassport - direct connect (no hub)
    • Hi flmaxey

      Thank you for your answer. The purpose of the virtual machine is to have a machine always on, justo for me to connect to it from outside. Like establishing a vpn and then connect to it using RDP. This machine will be windows 10 and as i said is to have a available machine to do some browsing open some files, run some basic tools and nothing more, it will perform like a desktop. Another virtual machine is a linux to have the same purpose, this is just for lab testing and nothing more.

      So, this linux machine will not be always started, and can be shutdown.

      For what i have investigated, the 4000 series intel cpu was a great choice, it will speed up the TDP to a higher value. This will be a problem for me because i have a Fractal cube already with 6 Sata disks. The second problem is the higher value of the 4th generation cpu. This option is the best for me, but i dont know if its the best. Compare it to a I3 8th generation that have 4 cores. The used i5 price is higher. The problem with this option is that i will need to buy a new board, New CPU and new memory, the advantage is that i have a lower TDP for that.

      These were my choices, but dont know what is the best one.
    • Choices and trade offs - over and over. :) There's no one way to do it right, but cost is usually a driver.

      I'd say, you need something in the Passmark range of 5000 or better to run OMV and a Win10 VM, at the same time, without hiccups.

      If you look over the Passmark CPU page, you'll find huge cost differences between CPU's that perform near equally, so,, I tend to ignore the latest cutting edge tech go with what's on sale. (That's how I got into the client I mentioned with a +8000 CPU, at a bargain basement price.) Overall, I believe you could get away with 16GB RAM, if you'd be starting the Linux VM on demand.

      How are you booting your OMV NAS now? Is it a hard drive or USB?
      Good backup takes the "drama" out of computing
      ____________________________________
      Primary: OMV 3.0.99, ThinkServer TS140, 12GB ECC, 32GB USB boot, 4TB+4TB zmirror, 3TB client backup.
      Backup: OMV 4.1.9, Acer RC-111, 4GB, 32GB USB boot, 3TB+3TB zmirror, 4TB Rsync'ed disk
      2nd Data Backup: OMV 3.0.99, R-PI 2B, 16GB boot, 4TB WD USB MyPassport - direct connect (no hub)