Moving files from Freenas to Openmediavault

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    • Moving files from Freenas to Openmediavault

      Hi

      I am very new to OMV, i have been using Freenas but have to decided to move to OMV.

      I am trying to find a way to move all my files from freenas to OMV.
      I cant use the same drives as my OMV server doesnt use 3.5inch drives.
      Freenas and OMV are both running on different servers.
      I tried moving them using my Laptop but its very slow as I believe its going through my laptop.
      I have been reading about rsync but im not very versed with that, I am willing to try if its the best option.
      Any ideas or suggestions?

      Thanks
    • rsync seems to be the best option, but you can also use SMB or FTP.
      Absolutely no support through PM!

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    • drwhowhogrub wrote:

      Can I mount SMB or FTP from FreeNas in OMV?
      With the remotemount plugin, you can. You just need to make sure you use a user with the proper permissions.
      omv 4.1.13 arrakis | 64 bit | 4.15 proxmox kernel | omvextrasorg 4.1.13
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    • Yes.

      You could mount a FreeNAS SMB share, in OMV, using the Remote Mount plugin. To connect to a FreeNAS SMB share with Remote Mount, you'd need the username and password of a user that has access to the SMB share.

      After that, you'd be able to set up a shared folder, in OMV, for the remote FreeNAS SMB share. From there, under Services, Rsync, you'd set up a local Rsync Job with the mounted FreeNAS SMB share as the source and an OMV shared folder as the destination.

      Regrettably, if you have more questions on how to set this up, I won't be able to answer until this coming weekend.)

      (Regrets @ryecoaaron for stepping in. I suppose I should have hit the submit button, on this post, a few hours ago.)

      Video Guides :!: New User Guide :!: Docker Guides :!: Pi-hole in Docker
      Good backup takes the "drama" out of computing.
      ____________________________________
      Primary: OMV 3.0.99, ThinkServer TS140, 12GB ECC, 32GB USB boot, 4TB+4TB zmirror, 3TB client backup.
      Backup: OMV 4.1.9, Acer RC-111, 4GB, 32GB USB boot, 3TB+3TB zmirror, 4TB Rsync'ed disk
    • You're welcome and it's good to have you coming on-board with OMV.
      It's the best NAS system around.

      Let us know how it goes.

      Video Guides :!: New User Guide :!: Docker Guides :!: Pi-hole in Docker
      Good backup takes the "drama" out of computing.
      ____________________________________
      Primary: OMV 3.0.99, ThinkServer TS140, 12GB ECC, 32GB USB boot, 4TB+4TB zmirror, 3TB client backup.
      Backup: OMV 4.1.9, Acer RC-111, 4GB, 32GB USB boot, 3TB+3TB zmirror, 4TB Rsync'ed disk
    • So I have managed to mount my local smb share on OVM, but I am having issues pulling the data.

      Im not sure how to set it up.

      I get error messages such as "Host key verification failed." or Im told to change the folder as is doesn't exists

      Am I connecting via ssh?
      Do I need a password? as the samba share is open to guests.
      I have tried my ssh account and password, do I need to use a public key?

      thanks

      -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      EDIT:

      I think I have sorted it, this is what I have done, let my know if there is another or better way.

      I had already created a shared folder in the Access Rights Management field with the local disks

      I then mounted the remote SMB share using the remote mount plugin
      Then I made that mounted SMB share a Shared Folder in OMV in the Access Rights Management field
      and then I ran a local rsync job between the two shared folders in the Access Rights Management field


      It worked but I'm not sure if all those steps were needed.

      The post was edited 1 time, last by drwhowhogrub ().

    • (Back in Town.)

      I'm impressed - it seems you got it right, out of the gate.
      (To explain it for others who may read this.)

      First, Remote Mount uses a user name and password that has access to the remote SMB network share. (This must be a user, recognized by the remote server, who has access to the SMB share.)

      In the Remote Mount plugin dialog box, the fields needed are;

      Mount type SMB/CIFS
      Server name
      (or IP)
      Share name
      username
      password


      If configured correctly, the root of the Remote Mounted share is treated as if it's a local drive. You'll see it in the GUI menu under Storage, File Systems.

      Then, set up the Remote Mounted share/File system as a local shared folder.
      To copy the contents of the Remote Mounted share (now treated as local shared folder) set up a Local Rsync Job, with the Remote SMB share as the source, paired with an actual local shared folder as the destination.
      ______________________________________________________________

      Beyond a one time data move - this setup can also be used to regularly replicate networks shares from your main server to a backup server.
      So we'll say, after you get your files over to an OMV server, that you want to use the old FreeNAS server productively.
      Load OMV on it :) , then look at the following.


      (I'm assumming you have remote mounts working properly.)
      Here's an example of what I have on one of my backup servers.

      Remote Mount:
      Note the names of each Mount. Name extensions where added to indicate remote (R) and server name. This reduces confusion later, when creating pairs of shared folders and Rsync pairs.


      The resultant Remote File Systems look like local drives:



      Shared Folder Pairs:
      Note that the relative path should be "/" to indicate the root of the remote share. (This may require backspacing the default entry out, when it's created.)


      Here are some of my Rsync Pairs. With the right switches, "extended attributes", "delete in destination - if not in the source" for mirroring, etc., etc, scheduled replication of a main servers shares, onto a backup server, is a breeze.



      **Despite the switch in the Rsync Job for "preserve permissions", note that permissions will not transfer from the foreign volume on a remote host. The default creation mask is used (root:root) but you can override that behavior with something like this in the Rsync Job's extra options:
      Extras Options: --chmod=0755 --chown=root:users

      (The permissions reset needed may vary, but the end result should match the permissions of the share on the main server.)
      ________________________________________________________

      The replicated shares, now on the backup server, can be made available on the local net with CIF/SMB shares.

      For this purpose I set up the backup server, identically to the main server - identical users and passwords, permissions, everything - with the exception of one parameter - the workgroup name. With a different workgroup name (STANDBY for example), my local clients don't see the backup server (which prevents them from writing to it).
      If my main server crashes and can't be resurrected quickly, I change the workgroup name on the backup server so clients can see it and use it. Everyone is on line again with data that is no more than 1 day old. (I Rsync shares once a day.)

      In OMV, there are many options for both Operating System and Data backup. After you've moved your data, give a good backup plan some thought.

      While I'm a bit biased, in your decision to jump from FreeNAS to OMV, you made the right choice. :thumbup:

      Video Guides :!: New User Guide :!: Docker Guides :!: Pi-hole in Docker
      Good backup takes the "drama" out of computing.
      ____________________________________
      Primary: OMV 3.0.99, ThinkServer TS140, 12GB ECC, 32GB USB boot, 4TB+4TB zmirror, 3TB client backup.
      Backup: OMV 4.1.9, Acer RC-111, 4GB, 32GB USB boot, 3TB+3TB zmirror, 4TB Rsync'ed disk
    • Thanks for that info, there is a lot there so i will need to refer to it several times before I fully understand it.

      I was wrapt once the files started transferring, it took a bit of playing around as I kept thinking the remote mount wasn't local, but once I realised
      that the mount was local it worked!

      So now I'm ready to do the big file shift as I was testing it first encase I messed it up.

      The more I'm using OMV I'm seeing how powerful it is. So I am getting rid of the FreeNas server as It seems to be a resource hog. I think that I will set up another OMV as a backup server and try those steps you have suggested

      Thanks for your input, your advise has been very beneficial.
    • drwhowhogrub wrote:

      1. it took a bit of playing around as I kept thinking the remote mount wasn't local, but once I realisedthat the mount was local it worked!

      2. So now I'm ready to do the big file shift as I was testing it first encase I messed it up.

      3. The more I'm using OMV I'm seeing how powerful it is. So I am getting rid of the FreeNas server as It seems to be a resource hog. I think that I will set up another OMV as a backup server and try those steps you have suggested
      Key'ed to the above:

      1. When I first set up host-to-host Rsync replication, I made the same mistake.

      2. If you test, you're way ahead of the game. You'll know what happens in any given scenario if you test it first.
      Note that OMV runs well in a VM. If you want to test something new, load it up in Virtual Box and give it a virtual try first.

      3. I came from Windows Server. OMV is far faster, on same hardware, the capabilities are superior and the plugin's are outstanding. While a bit more on the advanced side, Dockers allow for an extensive number of server add-ons (there are How-To's on the forum). Windows has nothing that could compare, when it comes to reliability and having a smorgasbord of efficient and lightening fast capabilities on the same box.

      While it's obvious that you're not a beginner, depending on your experience, there are a few utilities that you might find useful like WinSCP, and Midnight Commander. This guide will show you what they look like and, if you're interested, how to set them up. You may find a few useful items in there about backup as well.

      Video Guides :!: New User Guide :!: Docker Guides :!: Pi-hole in Docker
      Good backup takes the "drama" out of computing.
      ____________________________________
      Primary: OMV 3.0.99, ThinkServer TS140, 12GB ECC, 32GB USB boot, 4TB+4TB zmirror, 3TB client backup.
      Backup: OMV 4.1.9, Acer RC-111, 4GB, 32GB USB boot, 3TB+3TB zmirror, 4TB Rsync'ed disk
    • I have been looking at the plugins and they seem really awesome, I have already installed the Plex plugin. I was hoping I could install a Nextcloud instance and I'm guessing I can do that with Docker but have never used Docker before so will have to look into that.
      I will try the VM for tests that's a great idea and still consider myself a beginner as I have no training whatsoever but forums are a big help and also just trying, but I could be moving onto the next step.