Asking for a opinion

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    • Asking for a opinion

      Hello guys,

      Im newbie in the forum, i want to build a NAS for my home, the usual used that i will give it is streaming my collection is commonly 1080p and 720p movies, i was thinking in something like a mini pc example :Link i wanna know if this will be enough to stream that resolution movies,

      thank you in advance,
    • I agree with @bmxtricky on the CPU and the storage notes.

      OMV runs fine from SD-cards 8GB or larger and, while the extra speed wouldn't hurt anything, it doesn't have to be a class 10 card. (But it should be a name brand card, like PNY, Samsung, etc. Don't go with a cheap generic.) However, you will need to use the flashmemory plugin when booting from flash media.

      Since they're relatively inexpensive, get 2 SD-cards so you can clone the finished, fully configured, boot drive (SD-card). Cloning flash boot drives, installing the flashmedia plugin, and other related topics are covered in this guide.
      Good backup takes the "drama" out of computing
      ____________________________________
      Primary: OMV 3.0.99, ThinkServer TS140, 12GB ECC, 32GB USB boot, 4TB+4TB zmirror, 3TB client backup.
      Backup: OMV 4.1.9, Acer RC-111, 4GB, 32GB USB boot, 3TB+3TB zmirror, 4TB Rsync'ed disk
      2nd Data Backup: OMV 3.0.99, R-PI 2B, 16GB boot, 4TB WD USB MyPassport - direct connect (no hub)
    • flmaxey wrote:

      it doesn't have to be a class 10 card. (But it should be a name brand card, like PNY, Samsung, etc

      PNY is the same crap as Kingston (they do not do flash storage products, they let others assemble what's cheap on stock markets and then print their 'brand' on). And recommending those 'brands' is stupid. Fraudsters rely on clueless people buying 'brands'. Counterfeit flash products is still a huge problem.

      If you buy an SD card for anything today only buy A1 or A2 rated cards and check them immediately after purchase for faked capacity and performance.
    • tkaiser wrote:

      And recommending those 'brands' is stupid.
      We've had a conversation about your use of the word "stupid" on the forum. You've been proven wrong more than once so, if you don't mind, please,, spare everyone your comments with crass language like "stupid".
      Setting that aside, can we all assume that you're the all seeing, all knowing, Guru of PC electronics?

      tkaiser wrote:

      Fraudsters rely on clueless people buying 'brands'. Counterfeit flash products is still a huge problem.
      "Clueless People",,, - because, I suppose, you're "in the know". :) The amusement never ends...

      I've bought more than a few flash devices over the years, even a couple cheap generics out of a box without packaging, and not a single one has ever tested with an error or was smaller than advertised. (And I test everything.) While that's anecdotal experience, I've never seen a fake and I suspect 95% of flash users on this forum (or more) have never seen one either.

      On the other hand, I do know something about "Fraud"; enough to know that to make the maximum profit, most fraudsters would avoid blister wrapped packaging, with OEM logo's, because producing faked but convincing packaging is an unnecessary expense. (It cut's into profits.) Hence, products with sealed packaging are less likely to be fakes.

      tkaiser wrote:

      PNY is the same crap as Kingston (they do not do flash storage products, they let others assemble what's cheap on stock markets and then print their 'brand' on)
      LOTS of companies put their brands on products made by other companies and that's not limited to electronics. There are only a handful of OEM's for most consumer products, in the world, and that includes items like refrigerators and washing machines. Just because something has been rebranded, or made by another OEM on a contract, doesn't make it "crap" or defective.

      tkaiser wrote:

      If you buy an SD card for anything today only buy A1 or A2 rated cards and check them immediately after purchase for faked capacity and performance.
      This is the only truly useful piece of advice you've offer in your rant. However, testing flash media, how to do it, and the programs needed for testing media are in the guide, along with a recommendation for "A2" SD-cards.
      ________________________________________________________

      In any case, "Congratulations". You've initiated a brand new user to the forum with abrasive, over the top comments and commentary. (If you think that makes you look "real smart", it doesn't.)
      Good backup takes the "drama" out of computing
      ____________________________________
      Primary: OMV 3.0.99, ThinkServer TS140, 12GB ECC, 32GB USB boot, 4TB+4TB zmirror, 3TB client backup.
      Backup: OMV 4.1.9, Acer RC-111, 4GB, 32GB USB boot, 3TB+3TB zmirror, 4TB Rsync'ed disk
      2nd Data Backup: OMV 3.0.99, R-PI 2B, 16GB boot, 4TB WD USB MyPassport - direct connect (no hub)

      The post was edited 2 times, last by flmaxey: edit2 ().

    • flmaxey wrote:

      a recommendation for "A2" SD-cards

      Why? A2 rated cards are too expensive since only SanDisk produces them currently and capacities start at 64 GB. What is this recommendation for? Preventing users from following?

      Today only A1 rated cards should be bought and of course testing them is mandatory even if fake flash does not exist in your world (BTW: I'm talking only to you and not to 'brand new forum users'). Counterfeit flash memory is present everywhere: petapixel.com/2018/05/31/bewar…counterfeit-memory-cards/

      So only buy stuff from sellers with a 'no questions asked' return/refund policy and immediately test the cards after arrival. Looking at brands is stupid since fraudsters obviously use brand names for their fakes.

      BTW: I've been wrong above since Kingston in the meantime also has A1 rated cards called 'Kingston Canvas React'

      Link hopefully containing a dynamically updated list of A1 rated cards: translate.google.de/translate?…XC%257E5963_A1&edit-text= (original link in german: geizhals.de/?cat=sm_sdhc&xf=29…7E298_microSDXC%7E5963_A1)

      The post was edited 1 time, last by tkaiser: Wrong link to A1 rated cards ().

    • Mr.Grape wrote:

      Where people buy these things so that they end up with counterfeit products?

      For example on Amazon's 'marketplace', see the link above: petapixel.com/2018/05/31/bewar…counterfeit-memory-cards/ -- and if you're already there check the other links for example petapixel.com/2011/05/20/one-t…on-earth-are-counterfeit/

      If you order on eBay or Aliexpress such a 'recommended' Samsung card the chance you get a fake is way above 50% (of course not only SanDisk cards are faked but Samsung, Kingston or in general every 'good' BRAND). This refreshing report talks about 'I recently got about 20 64GB Micro SD cards for some project at various online sources (eBay, Ali, etc). 17 of those cards are fake'

      That's why it makes me really sad to repeatedly read the recommendation to buy 'brands' when all that's important is:

      • where you buy (a seller with 'no questions asked return/refund' policy so you can return cards you don't like)
      • test them immediately to spot fakes


      If someone recommends to a novice to 'buy PNY' but not tells also the truth about counterfeit flash memory products being the rule and not the exception with some sales channels, he does no good job to this novice.
    • tkaiser wrote:

      flmaxey wrote:

      a recommendation for "A2" SD-cards
      Why? A2 rated cards are too expensive since only SanDisk produces them currently and capacities start at 64 GB. What is this recommendation for?
      (There's that "fixation", quoting a single item, while ignoring overall content.)
      Believe it or not A2 (versus A1) was a typo. When writing a 70+ page document, it's guaranteed to contain a couple errors. If you don't believe that, try it some time.

      Personally, I didn't bother with class 10 SD-Cards, the A1 spec, or other high performance options because after the boot cycle is complete (once a month) their performance impact is minimal. They're not needed for my use case, and they'd have questionable utility for the average beginner.
      ___________________________________________________________

      As has been gone over in detail in the guide, fast media of any type is simply not needed to boot OMV. As it's stated (roughly speaking); after boot-up, most of the working components of the operating system needed for NAS Op's are running from RAM. Outside of the web GUI or running add-on servers, there's little benefit in using fast booting media.
      Any "clean" flash device of reasonable quality will do the job and, with the flash-memory plugin, they will have a reasonable life span. Of course, testing is needed, even for new items, but that has been made abundantly clear in the document, along with how to do it.


      (From this thread - I did make appropriate annotations in the guide about, "buying on-line" - "there's a substantial risk", and when it comes to "A-spec SD-cards", an appropriate "while not essential"... was added. Both statements are accurate and they'll be in the next guide version. Of course, as always, users will decide what they want to do.)

      What you're not taking into account is the advice in this thread and in the guide is for beginners. With that noted, there's only so much that can be said about flash media, before their eyes glaze over. (Or, would you tell me that you're a trained instructor and technical writer as well?)
      ____________________________________________________________

      On the fraud topic:
      Usually, it comes in two forms - prices on items that are "too good to be true" (Ebay and others) and the high end market.
      As it is with purses, handbags, watches, etc., "uber" high end items are primary targets for fraud because it's extremely profitable.

      Along those lines, remember we're talking home use and small businesses here (not data centers). Why should someone pay $40 for a single high end SD-Card or USB drive, when an item of decent quality will do the job, and can be had in a sealed blister pack at Wal-Mart, for $10? And better yet, get a 3 pack of 32gb drives at Costco (in the US) for around $29, for some OS backup. Both stores have generous return policies and the items they sell are in sealed packaging.

      If beginners go with "middle of the road" items, avoid buying on-line, avoid high end items, avoid cheap generics and test all items as is appropriately stressed, the vast majority of them are going to be fine.
      ____________________________________________________________

      Now, noting that cheap generic flash media can and does test error free, would you encourage their use? (Or) Would you rather have beginners use a name brand like San-Disk, Samsung or even something rebranded by PNY?

      Let's look at this constructively, rather than critically. What would you suggest they buy?
      ____________________________________________________________

      (And, really, unless you have something to add to it - there's no need to underscore testing anymore. Flash media testing processes were covered and stressed, in the User Guide, since the very first draft.)
      Good backup takes the "drama" out of computing
      ____________________________________
      Primary: OMV 3.0.99, ThinkServer TS140, 12GB ECC, 32GB USB boot, 4TB+4TB zmirror, 3TB client backup.
      Backup: OMV 4.1.9, Acer RC-111, 4GB, 32GB USB boot, 3TB+3TB zmirror, 4TB Rsync'ed disk
      2nd Data Backup: OMV 3.0.99, R-PI 2B, 16GB boot, 4TB WD USB MyPassport - direct connect (no hub)

      The post was edited 4 times, last by flmaxey: edit ().

    • flmaxey wrote:

      What would you suggest they buy?

      How many more times? A1 rated SD cards from sellers that provide a 'no questions asked' return/refund policy. The brand is irrelevant, it's the specs they meet.

      A1 rated means: These cards are developed today, they're not made from scraps as the average card out there maybe combining refurbished flash dies with ancient controllers. Getting USB3 gear instead of USB2 gear even if it's only to connect it to USB2 ports serves the same purpose: Avoid buying crap. Buy recent technology. Buy tech that's made for the use case and not for something entirely different (camcorder or digicam).

      Once you do an omv-release-upgrade you also realize the difference. On 'average cards' this takes hours while with a modern A1 rated card this is done in minutes. You don't want any server in a critial state for a longer time. That's why we care for example about RAID rebuild times and of course also the time it takes for a distro upgrade.

      The post was edited 1 time, last by tkaiser ().

    • tkaiser wrote:

      How many more times? A1 rated SD cards from sellers that provide a 'no questions asked' return/refund policy. The brand is irrelevant, it's the specs they meet.

      A1 rated means: These cards are developed today, they're not made from scraps as the average card out there maybe combining refurbished flash dies with ancient controllers. Getting USB3 gear instead of USB2 gear even if it's only to connect it to USB2 ports serves the same purpose: Avoid buying crap. Buy recent technology. Buy tech that's made for the use case and not for something entirely different (camcorder or digicam).

      Once you do an omv-release-upgrade you also realize the difference. On 'average cards' this takes hours while with a modern A1 rated card this is done in minutes. You don't want any server in a critial state for a longer time. That's why we care for example about RAID rebuild times and of course also the time it takes for a distro upgrade.
      And how many more times will it take for you to understand that Beginners are not PC hardware aficionado's? They're not going to research SD-cards to the lengths you'd prefer, any more than you'd bother researching Egomania or other personality disorders. High spec flash media is not on their radar, when re-purposing an old laptop or PC.
      Broadly speaking, they want usable, general advice and that should include "cost effective" approaches for those users in the third world, who are forced to use open source software because money is tight. (Yeah, I know you that wouldn't think of that...) General documentation, and advice in beginner threads, MUST take that into account.

      In the bottom line, A1 spec'd SD-cards are not required and USB2 drives would do the job. The build process is a one time thing - if it takes longer than you think it should, no one cares. That also applies to those who do an omv-release-upgrade, versus a rebuild. That particular scenario would only crop up once in a few years. And if a once a month boot up takes 3 minutes, versus 2 again, it's no big deal. IT-IS-THAT-SIMPLE.

      Try to realize this, and I know it may be difficult, others don't have same priorities you have. Frankly, that doesn't make them wrong and it certainly doesn't make you right. Lastly, if all you can come up with is crass language, for expressing your "opinion" in a Beginner's thread (who has posted 2 times), do everyone a favor and keep it to yourself.
      Good backup takes the "drama" out of computing
      ____________________________________
      Primary: OMV 3.0.99, ThinkServer TS140, 12GB ECC, 32GB USB boot, 4TB+4TB zmirror, 3TB client backup.
      Backup: OMV 4.1.9, Acer RC-111, 4GB, 32GB USB boot, 3TB+3TB zmirror, 4TB Rsync'ed disk
      2nd Data Backup: OMV 3.0.99, R-PI 2B, 16GB boot, 4TB WD USB MyPassport - direct connect (no hub)

      The post was edited 1 time, last by flmaxey: edit ().

    • flmaxey wrote:

      do everyone a favor and keep it to yourself
      Why should I stop commenting on bad recommendations? There exists no reason to recommend crappy flash products. Less than 'Class 10' is a joke since random IO performance is horribly low and these things might be made from scraps.

      The average user will never get that bad flash exists and then complains about the software failing he's running off the crappy flash product.

      If you can get an A1 rated card (those are not more expensive than the crappy and ultra slow cards) you always should get one. If not then you need to choose something else or a different approach (e.g. using no SD card at all and install the stuff on a partition).

      But hey, I've no idea what you're talking about anyway all the time:

      flmaxey wrote:

      those users in the third world

      flmaxey wrote:

      sealed blister pack at Wal-Mart, for $10? And better yet, get a 3 pack of 32gb drives at Costco (in the US) for around $29
    • flmaxey wrote:

      OMV runs fine from SD-cards 8GB
      No one should buy any 8 GB card in 2018 any more. Those cards are either way too expensive or too slow.

      The larger the card the later it wears out with same amount of data written to it. A good budget buy is SanDisk A1 Ultra and there especially the 32GB variant: amazon.com/Sandisk-Ultra-128GB-Micro-Adapter/dp/B073JWXGNT/ -- questionable seller but at least offering a 'no questions asked' return/refund policy so it's easy to return counterfeit cards if some slipped into Amazon's supply chain (fakes were also sold directly from Amazon, not just only from 'Amazon marketplace')
    • tkaiser wrote:

      But hey, I've no idea what you're talking about anyway all the time:
      How could you? - when your entire world is about, you. Have you ever thought about the reasons why you're banned from other forums? :) Maybe it has something to do with (OCD) and having to be "right" all the time.
      Good backup takes the "drama" out of computing
      ____________________________________
      Primary: OMV 3.0.99, ThinkServer TS140, 12GB ECC, 32GB USB boot, 4TB+4TB zmirror, 3TB client backup.
      Backup: OMV 4.1.9, Acer RC-111, 4GB, 32GB USB boot, 3TB+3TB zmirror, 4TB Rsync'ed disk
      2nd Data Backup: OMV 3.0.99, R-PI 2B, 16GB boot, 4TB WD USB MyPassport - direct connect (no hub)

      The post was edited 2 times, last by flmaxey ().