What should I use for a boot drives?

    • What should I use for a boot drives?

      I picked up an HP Proliant ML110 G7 - Xeon E3-1220@3.10GHz 16GB 2x 300GB SAS & x2 250GB SATA = 1.1TB. After everything is running smoothly, I will move 2-3 3TB DT01ACA300 from my main rig and ass an 8tb when I find a good deal on an external. My network is an 8-Port Gigabit Unmanaged Switch - Netgear ProSafe GS108 v3, connected to a TP-Link TL-WDR7300 AC2100 router to the ISP modem.

      I want to run a headless server design with GUI. I will be running server function, backup of my OS drives on Win10 desktop and Macbook Pro, transmission, Sonarr, Plex and Headphones. I’ve read through the getting started PDF and I understand that all of these options will need OMV-Extras and the flash memory plugin. I have a SanDisk Ultra Fit 32GB sitting on my shelf, and a Transcend Ultimate 32GB SD card that can plug into an internal header. I don’t know how the SC card port functions as I’ve never had on a mother board before. I can also pick up a used 64-128GB SSD for £10 from a local forum.

      Will all of these options function the same or is one better?
      Is 32GB enough for my needs?

      I'm not exactly sure what I have:
      From what I can tell it has an internal SD card and USB port.
      [Blocked Image: https://i.imgur.com/THHIoXW.jpg?1]
      [Blocked Image: https://i.imgur.com/PyM4QLD.jpg?1]

      The post was edited 2 times, last by silk186 ().

    • You can use either.

      But it might be best to use something that is easy to handle and easy to replace. And easy to have at least one spare for.

      In your place I'd go for USB thumbdrive. You can easily get another and clone them using any PC.

      But if you have a PC with a SD card reader, then that is true for SD card as well.

      I'd avoid using a used SSD. It is possible that would work best and for a long time, but it may also fail at any time and it is not as easy to have a backup SSD.
      OMV 4, 7 x ODROID HC2, 1 x ODROID HC1, 3 x 12TB, 2 x 8TB, 1 x 4TB, 1 x 2TB SSHD, 1 x 500GB SSD, GbE, WiFi mesh
    • That sounds good. I have two SanDisk Ultra Fit 32GB drives. I recently discovered the internal USB port so I can plug the thumb drive in and plug in the SD card to make a backup of the thumb drive I think?

      What is the best way to backup the OS drive?
      Can I automate it to make a back-up once a day?
    • silk186 wrote:

      What is the best way to backup the OS drive?
      Can I automate it to make a back-up once a day?
      There are several threads here regarding this topic. To use the forum search is always a good choice ;)
      See here: Simplifying The OMV Configuration Backup and Restore Process
      OMV 3.0.90 (Gray style)
      ASRock Rack C2550D4I - 16GB ECC - 6x WD RED 3TB (ZFS 2x3 Striped RaidZ1)- Fractal Design Node 304
    • If you really need to backup the OS drive every day you are doing something seriously wrong and your thoughts about using flash memory for the OS can be scrapped. Then you need a SSD.

      On the root filesystem I ONLY have apps and configuration. No, or at least very, very little, data that change often, This means that I only need to backup the root filesystem when I'm doing major upgrades that perhaps also involves configuration changes. Perhaps once a month or half year? Then it is easy to shut down, remove the USB drive and clone it. That is exactly what I do, but with SD cards.

      I have a current cloned copy of all cards, ready to plug in, as well as images of all the cards on my laptop, for making more clones. (And backups of the laptop on a NAS.)

      The data drive may need much more frequent backups. Even daily or more frequent.
      OMV 4, 7 x ODROID HC2, 1 x ODROID HC1, 3 x 12TB, 2 x 8TB, 1 x 4TB, 1 x 2TB SSHD, 1 x 500GB SSD, GbE, WiFi mesh
    • cabrio_leo wrote:

      silk186 wrote:

      What is the best way to backup the OS drive?
      Can I automate it to make a back-up once a day?
      There are several threads here regarding this topic. To use the forum search is always a good choice ;) See here: Simplifying The OMV Configuration Backup and Restore Process
      Thanks, the trouble of the search is knowing which terms to use.


      Adoby wrote:

      If you really need to backup the OS drive every day you are doing something seriously wrong and your thoughts about using flash memory for the OS can be scrapped. Then you need a SSD.

      On the root filesystem I ONLY have apps and configuration. No, or at least very, very little, data that change often, This means that I only need to backup the root filesystem when I'm doing major upgrades that perhaps also involves configuration changes. Perhaps once a month or half year? Then it is easy to shut down, remove the USB drive and clone it. That is exactly what I do, but with SD cards.

      I have a current cloned copy of all cards, ready to plug in, as well as images of all the cards on my laptop, for making more clones. (And backups of the laptop on a NAS.)

      The data drive may need much more frequent backups. Even daily or more frequent.
      This would be a back-up in the event that the OS storage device fails. It doesn't need to be anything fancy but I would like it to be automated so that I can easily recovery from a hardware failure. I don't have experience working with any type of RAID. I know if a hardware control dies, recovery of the array can be problematic. I assumed that if my thumb drive failed it could also be difficult to recover without a recent back-up.
    • Automatic backups are a nice recipe for catastrophic failure. I know first hand!

      Better might be quick and easy manual methods that automatically verify or even guarantee that the backup is good. For instance clone the USB drive after reconfiguring and/or major upgrades. And then switch the original and the cloned copy.

      This is only manageable if the need to clone is not too often. And that it can be accomplished quick and easy. This can be achieved by very strictly making sure that you don't have anything changing on the root filesystem. Which also is necessary if you use SD card or USB thumb drive.

      That said, even if you loose the root filesystem, it should be easy to reinstall and configure from scratch. Taking a few screen dumps may help.
      OMV 4, 7 x ODROID HC2, 1 x ODROID HC1, 3 x 12TB, 2 x 8TB, 1 x 4TB, 1 x 2TB SSHD, 1 x 500GB SSD, GbE, WiFi mesh
    • silk186 wrote:

      This would be a back-up in the event that the OS storage device fails. It doesn't need to be anything fancy but I would like it to be automated so that I can easily recovery from a hardware failure.
      If you discover an automated procedure for backing up the OS drive, test your recovery process in any case and verify carefully that the recovered OS drive will work actually. Many people have fully automated backup jobs (also for data drives), but are not familiar with the restore procedure and have never tested it if the backup medium is usable at all.

      If the OS is on an SD card it is enough to clone it after major changes as @Adoby has already noted.

      Please also have a look at this post from @flmaxey How to backup and restore OMV configuration ? BMR Plan - howto?
      OMV 3.0.90 (Gray style)
      ASRock Rack C2550D4I - 16GB ECC - 6x WD RED 3TB (ZFS 2x3 Striped RaidZ1)- Fractal Design Node 304
    • cabrio_leo wrote:

      silk186 wrote:

      I don't have experience working with any type of RAID.
      Another reason to create regular backups of your data :)
      ... and a very good reason not to use RAID.

      Besides, with RAID you may risk loosing all data on the whole array when only one drive in the array goes bad. So even if you use RAID, take backups!
      OMV 4, 7 x ODROID HC2, 1 x ODROID HC1, 3 x 12TB, 2 x 8TB, 1 x 4TB, 1 x 2TB SSHD, 1 x 500GB SSD, GbE, WiFi mesh
    • silk186 wrote:

      I don't have experience working with any type of RAID. I know if a hardware control dies, recovery of the array can be problematic.
      For these reasons, don't do RAID (of any kind) without full data backup. Instead, use the disks that would make up an array to create the 2nd copy (of your data). You'll be ahead of the curve and it's a bit more cost effective.

      silk186 wrote:

      I assumed that if my thumb drive failed it could also be difficult to recover without a recent back-up.
      If you think about it, basically, this is not true.
      The only time you need to update your OS (thumb-drive) backup is if you make changes to your configuration of the NAS. What does that mean? If you do generic security and other Linux updates to the NAS, (php, python, grub updates, etc.) there's no need to update your clone. But, if you add a new shared folder, setup a new service, add a new plugin, a new Docker, etc., these actions would fall into "your configuration". This is when you'd need to re-clone your spare and, after you settle on the configuration you want, this will be fairly rare.
      But, even if you didn't update when you should have, all that would be necessary would be to make the missed configuration changes to the older clone. (The data, in a new share for example, would still be there.) This would still be far easier than a full OS build and reconfiguring, from scratch.
      (BTW: When to update a clone is in the guide PDF.)

      Video Guides :!: New User Guide :!: Docker Guides :!: Pi-hole in Docker
      Good backup takes the "drama" out of computing.
      ____________________________________
      Primary: OMV 4.1.17, ThinkServer TS140, 12GB ECC, 16GB USB boot, 4TB+4TB zmirror, 3TB client backup.
      OMV 4.1.17, Intel Server SC5650HCBRP, 32GB ECC, 16GB USB boot, UnionFS+SNAPRAID
      Backup: OMV 4.1.9, Acer RC-111, 4GB, 32GB USB boot, 3TB+3TB zmirror, 4TB Rsync'ed disk
    • I suspect that it is VERY easy to implement. But I also suspect that if you need to ask you shouldn't do it.

      Note that if you have N drives, in a JBOD arrangement, you have N times higher risk of loosing ALL data in case of a random drive failure. So you then REALLY need to have good and recent backups.
      OMV 4, 7 x ODROID HC2, 1 x ODROID HC1, 3 x 12TB, 2 x 8TB, 1 x 4TB, 1 x 2TB SSHD, 1 x 500GB SSD, GbE, WiFi mesh
    • Adoby wrote:

      I suspect that it is VERY easy to implement. But I also suspect that if you need to ask you shouldn't do it.

      Note that if you have N drives, in a JBOD arrangement, you have N times higher risk of loosing ALL data in case of a random drive failure. So you then REALLY need to have good and recent backups.
      I thought that was the case with RAID 0, not JBOD. Can I not make a storage pool without stripping?
      I don't care if I lose some media. Everything important will be backed up to cloud and an external.

      "if you need to ask you shouldn't do it" is a pretty crap attitude. By that logic I shouldn't bother with OMV at all.
    • silk186 wrote:

      I'm thinking about JBOD, is this simple to implement?
      I hate to say this but, "it depends".
      In my opinion, JBOD at the physical level, is the way to go. These days, even if you go with RAID at some point, it's still best to let software assemble the array from JBOD disks. Otherwise, with hardware RAID, your disks are permanently married to the controller or a specific family of controller.) If it's a software array, you can move them (the disks) to a different hardware platform.

      On implementation, really, "it depends" on your controller. It appears that you bought a commercial server which, if you ignore the power they use :) , are a good deal - high quality, high end, server grade components throughout. (I have an Intel SC5650HCBRP that's similar.) The Intel came with an Adaptec controller (a PCI card) that, while it would do JBOD, it insisted on "initializing" every drive attached to it. Along with not passing SMART stat's transparently, this made using the stock controller a No-Go.
      That said, I suspect that your embedded RAID 0, 1, 10 controller may not have those issues. (I'm fairly sure it doesn't.) Set the controller to JBOD and see what happens. Thereafter, if you see the drive in OMV's GUI console, without having to do anything in the controllers BIOS to add a drive, you should be good to go.

      Beyond that, commercial servers are usually very well documented. See what you can find in the way of documents on HP's site. If you find your drive controller options are limited, take a read through of this -> thread. Flashing a RAID controller to IT mode is an intermediate level task, but the "bang for the buck" is excellent and you'd have a server grade controller with 8 ports at very low cost.


      silk186 wrote:

      It would be much easier to manage a single volume.

      If you want a single "mount point" that is similar to RAID, one of the safest routes to get it is with UnionFS (provides the common mount point) + SNAPRAID (just one disk provides for disk replacement, parity protection, file/folder restoration, and bitrot protection. There's no other way, that I'm aware of, to get all of those protections from a single additional disk. And nearly of the housekeeping functions, scrub's, etc., can be automated in Scheduled Tasks.

      BTW: If you're storing a lot of video files (very large) change the default storage policy in UnionFS from "Existing path, most free space" to "Most free space". You'll get even file distribution, among all drives, that is more suited to the purpose.

      Video Guides :!: New User Guide :!: Docker Guides :!: Pi-hole in Docker
      Good backup takes the "drama" out of computing.
      ____________________________________
      Primary: OMV 4.1.17, ThinkServer TS140, 12GB ECC, 16GB USB boot, 4TB+4TB zmirror, 3TB client backup.
      OMV 4.1.17, Intel Server SC5650HCBRP, 32GB ECC, 16GB USB boot, UnionFS+SNAPRAID
      Backup: OMV 4.1.9, Acer RC-111, 4GB, 32GB USB boot, 3TB+3TB zmirror, 4TB Rsync'ed disk