Low Transfer Speeds

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    • Low Transfer Speeds

      Hi, I've been using OMV for around 2 months on a HP dv6 laptop. Although I am quite satisfied with the overall system, ever since i began using it i could only reach a max transfer speed of 5MB/ps over SMB and AFP. Now however, the max speed has dropped to 2MB/ps on both protocols.

      Configuration:
      • Intel Core i7 Processor (3rd Generation)
      • 8GB RAM
      • 750GB HDD (Vendor: ATA)
      • Linux 3.16 (x64) Kernel
      • OMV v1.4 Kralizec
      • Onboard Broadcom Gigabit Ethernet Adapter

      Physical Disk Properties:
      • Adv. Power Mgmt: 254 - Max Performance w/ Max Power Usage
      • Auto Acoustic Mgmt: Max Performance w/ Max Acoustic Output
      • Spindown Time: 5 mins
      • Write-cache: enabled
      • RAID: disabled
      • S.M.A.R.T: enabled
      Network Configuration
      • Router: TP-Link 150Mbps Wireless ADSL2+ Modem Router
      • Network Cable: CAT5
      • IP Address: DHCP (Static)

      It has come to my notice that the normal data transfer rates are well above 50MB/ps, hence I would much appreciate someone's help in increasing my transfer speeds.
      Version: OMV 1.6 (Kralizec) w/ Backports 3.16 amd64 Kernel & OMV-Extras.org 1.2
      Hardware: HP g6 w/ Intel Core i7 Processor, 8GB RAM, 750GB HDD
      Services: AFP, SMB/CIFS, SSH, FTP, Plex, AutoShutdown

      The post was edited 5 times, last by Damian ().

    • subzero79 wrote:

      Test the disk read-write speeds, if they don't surpass 50-60MB/s which can be normal in laptop spin disk, not too much too do there.

      Source Code

      1. root@NAS:~# hdparm -I /dev/sda | grep -i speed
      2. * Gen1 signaling speed (1.5Gb/s)
      3. * Gen2 signaling speed (3.0Gb/s)


      Source Code

      1. root@NAS:~# hdparm -t /dev/sda
      2. /dev/sda:
      3. Timing buffered disk reads: 260 MB in 3.01 seconds = 86.42 MB/sec


      Display Spoiler

      Source Code

      1. root@NAS:~# hdparm -i /dev/sda
      2. /dev/sda:
      3. Model=ST750LM022 HN-M750MBB, FwRev=2AR10002, SerialNo=S2SUJ9AC500794
      4. Config={ Fixed }
      5. RawCHS=16383/16/63, TrkSize=0, SectSize=0, ECCbytes=4
      6. BuffType=unknown, BuffSize=8192kB, MaxMultSect=16, MultSect=off
      7. CurCHS=16383/16/63, CurSects=16514064, LBA=yes, LBAsects=1465149168
      8. IORDY=on/off, tPIO={min:120,w/IORDY:120}, tDMA={min:120,rec:120}
      9. PIO modes: pio0 pio1 pio2 pio3 pio4
      10. DMA modes: mdma0 mdma1 mdma2
      11. UDMA modes: udma0 udma1 udma2 udma3 udma4 udma5 *udma6
      12. AdvancedPM=yes: unknown setting WriteCache=enabled
      13. Drive conforms to: unknown: ATA/ATAPI-0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7
      Display All




      Version: OMV 1.6 (Kralizec) w/ Backports 3.16 amd64 Kernel & OMV-Extras.org 1.2
      Hardware: HP g6 w/ Intel Core i7 Processor, 8GB RAM, 750GB HDD
      Services: AFP, SMB/CIFS, SSH, FTP, Plex, AutoShutdown

      The post was edited 5 times, last by Damian ().

    • Damian,

      which TP-Link Model you are talking about? This one?
      tp-link.com.de/products/details/?model=TD-W8151N#down

      That has 10/100 MB on LAN...bad for your data rate :) Even so, if you are using wireless...

      Your Network-Setup is unclear to me. Can you precisise?

      You should put a good Gigabit-Switch behind your TP-Link and clamp all your stuff there.
      I would prefer a Netgear (cheap, but good) or a HP ProCurve (not so cheap...)

      HTH
      Murphy
      --
      Get a Rose Tattoo...

      HP t5740 with Expansion and USB3, Inateck Case w/ 3TB WD-Green
      OMV 2.2.14 Stone burner i386|3.2.0-4-686-pae
    • Dropkick Murphy wrote:

      Damian,

      which TP-Link Model you are talking about? This one?
      tp-link.com.de/products/details/?model=TD-W8151N#down

      That has 10/100 MB on LAN...bad for your data rate :) Even so, if you are using wireless...

      Your Network-Setup is unclear to me. Can you precisise?

      You should put a good Gigabit-Switch behind your TP-Link and clamp all your stuff there.
      I would prefer a Netgear (cheap, but good) or a HP ProCurve (not so cheap...)

      HTH
      Murphy

      Hi Murphy,
      I'm using the TP-Link TD-W8901N router. tp-link.com/en/products/detail…oryid=219&model=TD-W8901N
      Since the NAS is for home use, I see no point in using a switch. Isn't there another way to increase my transfer speeds?
      Version: OMV 1.6 (Kralizec) w/ Backports 3.16 amd64 Kernel & OMV-Extras.org 1.2
      Hardware: HP g6 w/ Intel Core i7 Processor, 8GB RAM, 750GB HDD
      Services: AFP, SMB/CIFS, SSH, FTP, Plex, AutoShutdown
    • That router is a 100 meg switch. You will never transfer faster than 12 MB/s. Murphy's suggestion to buy a gigabit switch is your least costly option to get faster transfers.
      omv 4.1.9 arrakis | 64 bit | 4.15 proxmox kernel | omvextrasorg 4.1.10
      omv-extras.org plugins source code and issue tracker - github

      Please read this before posting a question and this and this for docker questions.
      Please don't PM for support... Too many PMs!
    • The transfer speed Damian has mentioned (5mb/s down to 2mb/s) doesn't even fully utilize a 100mbit network. It would be interesting to know how the system is configured.
      Damian, you wrote that your system has only one harddisk. How did you configure the system, where are the data partitions stored?
      Homebox: Bitfenix Prodigy Case, ASUS E45M1-I DELUXE ITX, 8GB RAM, 5x 4TB HGST Raid-5 Data, 1x 320GB 2,5" WD Bootdrive via eSATA from the backside
      Companybox 1: Standard Midi-Tower, Intel S3420 MoBo, Xeon 3450 CPU, 16GB RAM, 5x 2TB Seagate Data, 1x 80GB Samsung Bootdrive - testing for iSCSI to ESXi-Hosts
      Companybox 2: 19" Rackservercase 4HE, Intel S975XBX2 MoBo, C2D@2200MHz, 8GB RAM, HP P212 Raidcontroller, 4x 1TB WD Raid-0 Data, 80GB Samsung Bootdrive, Intel 1000Pro DualPort (Bonded in a VLAN) - Temp-NFS-storage for ESXi-Hosts
    • Dropkick Murphy wrote:

      This one should do the job good enuff...
      amazon.de/NETGEAR-ProSafe-Plus…/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top

      Also available with 5 ports to safe some bucks...

      HTH

      Thanks for the suggestion Murphy, I will look into the NetGear, but like datadigger said, OMV doesnt fully utilize even the 100Mb network which gets me thinking whether it'll work any faster over a gigabit switch. I would be satisfied with even an increase to at least 12MB/ps over my current network.

      datadigger wrote:

      The transfer speed Damian has mentioned (5mb/s down to 2mb/s) doesn't even fully utilize a 100mbit network. It would be interesting to know how the system is configured.
      Damian, you wrote that your system has only one harddisk. How did you configure the system, where are the data partitions stored?

      Hi,
      OMV runs on an external Kingston DataTraveler 16GB flash-drive (/dev/sdb1). The primary file system (configured in ext4) is on the internal HDD (/dev/sda1). However to note, I have read posts of people running OMV on an external drive and having better transfer speeds than mine.
      Version: OMV 1.6 (Kralizec) w/ Backports 3.16 amd64 Kernel & OMV-Extras.org 1.2
      Hardware: HP g6 w/ Intel Core i7 Processor, 8GB RAM, 750GB HDD
      Services: AFP, SMB/CIFS, SSH, FTP, Plex, AutoShutdown

      The post was edited 1 time, last by Damian ().

    • Hm. With this setting there are IMHO not that much screws to turn and a notebook isn't the best choice as a base for a nas. And in addition and this has been mentioned countless times in this forum a flash drive is absolutely not recommended as a boot drive, the OS reads and writes a lot on it and they will wear out very fast. The decreasing transfer rate may be a first warning that it will die in near future. I have made this experience by myself with my first OMV installation some years ago, it took less than 4 weeks until the flash drive died.

      If your possibilites are limited I would try a single harddisk installation with Debian Wheezy as a base OS and then install OMV on top as described in this guide: Howto install OpenMediaVault on Debian 7.x (Wheezy)
      This kind of installation isn't possible with the standard OMV setup, it always uses the whole drive.

      Let Debian use only a small part of the drive and use the remaining space for OMV for the shares.
      Homebox: Bitfenix Prodigy Case, ASUS E45M1-I DELUXE ITX, 8GB RAM, 5x 4TB HGST Raid-5 Data, 1x 320GB 2,5" WD Bootdrive via eSATA from the backside
      Companybox 1: Standard Midi-Tower, Intel S3420 MoBo, Xeon 3450 CPU, 16GB RAM, 5x 2TB Seagate Data, 1x 80GB Samsung Bootdrive - testing for iSCSI to ESXi-Hosts
      Companybox 2: 19" Rackservercase 4HE, Intel S975XBX2 MoBo, C2D@2200MHz, 8GB RAM, HP P212 Raidcontroller, 4x 1TB WD Raid-0 Data, 80GB Samsung Bootdrive, Intel 1000Pro DualPort (Bonded in a VLAN) - Temp-NFS-storage for ESXi-Hosts
    • what is your client-system?
      What I noticed, that the transferspeeds with client-Win are faster than client-Linux (Ubuntu). But you should get IMO ~8-10MB in the middle with a 100MBitRouter
      "Glowing days. Don't cry because they are over. Smile because they happened." - Confucius

      Server: 1x 32GB SSD (system) - 5x 2TB Data - 1x 2TB Snapraid-Parity - latest OMV 1.x
      No Support through PM
      Tutorials --- Howto install OMV-Extras --- Upgrade/Update-Problems --- If autoshutdown doesn' -work
    • datadigger wrote:

      Hm. With this setting there are IMHO not that much screws to turn and a notebook isn't the best choice as a base for a nas. And in addition and this has been mentioned countless times in this forum a flash drive is absolutely not recommended as a boot drive, the OS reads and writes a lot on it and they will wear out very fast. The decreasing transfer rate may be a first warning that it will die in near future. I have made this experience by myself with my first OMV installation some years ago, it took less than 4 weeks until the flash drive died.

      If your possibilites are limited I would try a single harddisk installation with Debian Wheezy as a base OS and then install OMV on top as described in this guide: Howto install OpenMediaVault on Debian 7.x (Wheezy)
      This kind of installation isn't possible with the standard OMV setup, it always uses the whole drive.

      Let Debian use only a small part of the drive and use the remaining space for OMV for the shares.


      Datadigger,
      I guess there's nothing like the real thing then. The laptop was a spare with a broken screen, this seemed the only use I could get from it. Seeing as all HDD's now a days are 500GB and above, i didn't to waste that much space on just the base system, that's why I opted for the flash drive.

      Cheers mate!

      Solo0815 wrote:

      what is your client-system?
      What I noticed, that the transferspeeds with client-Win are faster than client-Linux (Ubuntu). But you should get IMO ~8-10MB in the middle with a 100MBitRouter


      Hi,
      I use a Mac (AFP), an HP running Win 8.1 (SMB) as well as a Raspberry Pi Model B+, all of which use the shares in OMV. I did notice something weird, although a single file transfers at 2.5MB/ps, when there are parallel transfers from the same Windows client the speeds remain at 2.5MB/ps for all.
      Version: OMV 1.6 (Kralizec) w/ Backports 3.16 amd64 Kernel & OMV-Extras.org 1.2
      Hardware: HP g6 w/ Intel Core i7 Processor, 8GB RAM, 750GB HDD
      Services: AFP, SMB/CIFS, SSH, FTP, Plex, AutoShutdown
    • Damian wrote:

      I guess there's nothing like the real thing then. The laptop was a spare with a broken screen, this seemed the only use I could get from it. Seeing as all HDD's now a days are 500GB and above, i didn't to waste that much space on just the base system, that's why I opted for the flash drive.


      You should have sliced the main drive using a wheezy install for system drive. The rest can be used by OMV as a volume.
      A usb stick is not ideal for OMV base install
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    • subzero79 wrote:

      You should have sliced the main drive using a wheezy install for system drive. The rest can be used by OMV as a volume.
      A usb stick is not ideal for OMV base install


      I didn't know about this earlier :( 70% of the HDD is already used up, there's no way I can do a fresh Wheezy install now. I'll keep it in mind till next time. :)
      Version: OMV 1.6 (Kralizec) w/ Backports 3.16 amd64 Kernel & OMV-Extras.org 1.2
      Hardware: HP g6 w/ Intel Core i7 Processor, 8GB RAM, 750GB HDD
      Services: AFP, SMB/CIFS, SSH, FTP, Plex, AutoShutdown
    • Damian wrote:

      subzero79 wrote:

      You should have sliced the main drive using a wheezy install for system drive. The rest can be used by OMV as a volume.
      A usb stick is not ideal for OMV base install


      I didn't know about this earlier :( 70% of the HDD is already used up, there's no way I can do a fresh Wheezy install now. I'll keep it in mind till next time. :)

      And that won't be very far in the future if you continue to use a flash drive as your boot device. It would be a good idea to have a working backup of your valuable data handy if that happens. And than install like subzero and I have suggested.
      Homebox: Bitfenix Prodigy Case, ASUS E45M1-I DELUXE ITX, 8GB RAM, 5x 4TB HGST Raid-5 Data, 1x 320GB 2,5" WD Bootdrive via eSATA from the backside
      Companybox 1: Standard Midi-Tower, Intel S3420 MoBo, Xeon 3450 CPU, 16GB RAM, 5x 2TB Seagate Data, 1x 80GB Samsung Bootdrive - testing for iSCSI to ESXi-Hosts
      Companybox 2: 19" Rackservercase 4HE, Intel S975XBX2 MoBo, C2D@2200MHz, 8GB RAM, HP P212 Raidcontroller, 4x 1TB WD Raid-0 Data, 80GB Samsung Bootdrive, Intel 1000Pro DualPort (Bonded in a VLAN) - Temp-NFS-storage for ESXi-Hosts
    • datadigger wrote:

      And that won't be very far in the future if you continue to use a flash drive as your boot device. It would be a good idea to have a working backup of your valuable data handy if that happens. And than install like subzero and I have suggested.


      Yea about that, what type of a backup should I keep, and how do I make it?

      Thanks in advance!
      Version: OMV 1.6 (Kralizec) w/ Backports 3.16 amd64 Kernel & OMV-Extras.org 1.2
      Hardware: HP g6 w/ Intel Core i7 Processor, 8GB RAM, 750GB HDD
      Services: AFP, SMB/CIFS, SSH, FTP, Plex, AutoShutdown
    • If you don't have a lot of plugins with special configurations running just leave the boot drive and save the data from the shares to i.e. an external USB drive.
      You can do that via the USB plugin from the plugin section inside the OMV web-gui, install and configure it and every time you plug that external drive in the backup will start.
      Homebox: Bitfenix Prodigy Case, ASUS E45M1-I DELUXE ITX, 8GB RAM, 5x 4TB HGST Raid-5 Data, 1x 320GB 2,5" WD Bootdrive via eSATA from the backside
      Companybox 1: Standard Midi-Tower, Intel S3420 MoBo, Xeon 3450 CPU, 16GB RAM, 5x 2TB Seagate Data, 1x 80GB Samsung Bootdrive - testing for iSCSI to ESXi-Hosts
      Companybox 2: 19" Rackservercase 4HE, Intel S975XBX2 MoBo, C2D@2200MHz, 8GB RAM, HP P212 Raidcontroller, 4x 1TB WD Raid-0 Data, 80GB Samsung Bootdrive, Intel 1000Pro DualPort (Bonded in a VLAN) - Temp-NFS-storage for ESXi-Hosts
    • Two other things to check would be that your network isnt being flooded by something and that your cabling is good. I have seen situations where the performance was poor due to bad cables. The port showed green but had 1 pair intermittent causing continuous retries. If you have a machine or device flooding then it would also be slow.

      Launch wireshark and watch the traffic to spot these types of problems.
    • datadigger wrote:

      If you don't have a lot of plugins with special configurations running just leave the boot drive and save the data from the shares to i.e. an external USB drive.
      You can do that via the USB plugin from the plugin section inside the OMV web-gui, install and configure it and every time you plug that external drive in the backup will start.


      What exactly is the USB backup plugin? Are you talking about openmediavault-backup 1.0.6? And can I backup the OMV system with this?

      earbiter wrote:

      Two other things to check would be that your network isnt being flooded by something and that your cabling is good. I have seen situations where the performance was poor due to bad cables. The port showed green but had 1 pair intermittent causing continuous retries. If you have a machine or device flooding then it would also be slow.

      Launch wireshark and watch the traffic to spot these types of problems.


      Hi, there doesn't seem to be any interference or network flooding at all, and since I have a CAT5 cable I'll be switching to a CAT6 cable to link the machine to the router. I'll keep you updated if that improves my transfer speed. :)
      Version: OMV 1.6 (Kralizec) w/ Backports 3.16 amd64 Kernel & OMV-Extras.org 1.2
      Hardware: HP g6 w/ Intel Core i7 Processor, 8GB RAM, 750GB HDD
      Services: AFP, SMB/CIFS, SSH, FTP, Plex, AutoShutdown
    • Damian wrote:


      What exactly is the USB backup plugin? Are you talking about openmediavault-backup 1.0.6? And can I backup the OMV system with this?


      No, I'm talking about openmediavault-usbbackup 1.1 from the OMV extras repo. Open
      omv-extras.org/simple/index.ph…install-omv-extras-plugin
      and download the file (Look for the correct version of OMV running on your box). Then goto the plugin section inside the web-gui, upload this deb-file and refresh the plugins. A lot of new plugins will be shown and the USB backup plugin is among them.
      This plugin can save your data to an external USB drive - but take care, the drive has to be wiped and formatted with ext4 before you can use it. This plugin uses rsync to copy the data do the drive.
      The plugin you have mentioned is for the system drive only, it saves the system drive and your configs. I doubt that this is of any use for you if you install the system using Debian and OMV on top as described in the tutorial I've mentioned above.
      Homebox: Bitfenix Prodigy Case, ASUS E45M1-I DELUXE ITX, 8GB RAM, 5x 4TB HGST Raid-5 Data, 1x 320GB 2,5" WD Bootdrive via eSATA from the backside
      Companybox 1: Standard Midi-Tower, Intel S3420 MoBo, Xeon 3450 CPU, 16GB RAM, 5x 2TB Seagate Data, 1x 80GB Samsung Bootdrive - testing for iSCSI to ESXi-Hosts
      Companybox 2: 19" Rackservercase 4HE, Intel S975XBX2 MoBo, C2D@2200MHz, 8GB RAM, HP P212 Raidcontroller, 4x 1TB WD Raid-0 Data, 80GB Samsung Bootdrive, Intel 1000Pro DualPort (Bonded in a VLAN) - Temp-NFS-storage for ESXi-Hosts