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  • Newb questions re OMV and Raspberry Pi 4

    Adoby - - General

    Post

    Quote from Involute: “Quote from Adoby: “3.5" drives typically need 12 volts. A RPi can only supply 5 volts. I too use a 2.5 SSD (2 TB Crucial MX500) with a RPi 4. On OMV 4. Works fine. Spinning may take too much power. ” Thanks for the Crucial tip. I might be able to get by with that capacity. What case do you use it with? ” I use a StarTech.com 52510BPU337 with ASM1053 chipset. It is nothing special, and was pretty cheap, but it has UASP and is built for 7 mm drives, so it is thin and pocket f…

  • I think I saw /usr/bin in one of the snapraid scripts, not relevant. I do something very similar, for my backups, but directly in the OS, not in OMV. I have all my scripts on the OMV backup server, in the same folder as where I store the snapshots. And I don't run the scripts directly but instead run bash with the scripts as a parameter. And the scripts are run as a normal user, not root. nas0 is backed up on nas1. Here is my "master" script that runs all the backup scripts. Source Code (5 lines…

  • Newb questions re OMV and Raspberry Pi 4

    Adoby - - General

    Post

    3.5" drives typically need 12 volts. A RPi can only supply 5 volts. I too use a 2.5 SSD (2 TB Crucial MX500) with a RPi 4. On OMV 4. Works fine. Spinning may take too much power.

  • Problem installing on a AMD G-T56n machine

    Adoby - - General

    Post

    If the screen or display doesn't work, but the OMV web GUI is OK, then you don't need a display. In fact I have six OMV servers running and none of them even have anything to plug a display to. Instead I use the web GUI and ssh to login remotely. OMV is designed to allow that. I would even say that this is the normal way to run OMV. Headless. Most Linux servers are headless, I think. Why would you want a display on a server? When you can login from your PC or laptop? The only reasons I can think…

  • Permission denied

    Adoby - - General

    Post

    /etc/passwd is not a command. Perhaps you are doing something wrong if you are having problems upgrading or getting updates? That is my thought. Why are you messing about with putty and ssh? What is it that you can't do in the web GUI? Do just one wrong thing you can easily totally break OMV. Especially if you are logged in as root using putty and ssh and try to run files randomly. That is the nuclear option.

  • CPU Temps for PI 3

    Adoby - - Plugins

    Post

    github.com/XavierBerger/RPi-Monitor

  • CPU Temps for PI 3

    Adoby - - Plugins

    Post

    Check out RPi-Monitor. I use it for my Odroid HC2s. Nice web interface. github.com/XavierBerger/RPi-Monitor However it might be better to run a worst case test and make sure that is OK. Max load, max ambient temp and minimal ventilation. If that is OK without overheating then you don't need to monitor. Otherwise add something. A fan or cooler.

  • Where are the script when you try to have them execute automatically? In the scripts it is specified that they are in /usr/bin. And the error message seems to imply that some is in /usr/sbin. /usr/bin seem like an unlikely place for the scripts. As do /usr/sbin. Perhaps you have not specified any path at all and then /usr/sbin is used in the error message? I would assume that the scripts run as root and are located in /root? Or possibly somewhere like /usr/local/bin. Then that path should be use…

  • Not sure if it would work or be very fast. But it is worth a try. You could build a custom case in wood. Here is an example with a nice internal rack for drives (the first design was noisy): ibuildit.ca/projects/design-an…d-a-wooden-computer-case/ Just place the Banana Pi close using some screws. Possibly behind a door or with the buttons accessible through a hole? If you use long thin screws you can put a piece of then plastic tubing between the wood and the PCB and use that as a standoff.

  • No. OMV is greedy and wants all of the drive. But you can partition before you install and not wipe the disk. If you partition or resize after, some software may cause the uuid of the partitions/drive to change. And that is something of a PITA. I know from personal experience. Ouch!

  • Then you may have a failed install. But test it: Type in that IP in the web browser and press enter. If it doesn't work, try something else. Switch cables, go to a friends house or use another sd card and so on. And reinstall.

  • How to Run a Command in the background

    Adoby - - General

    Post

    It lasts until you close it. Or reboot. If you run a script in it then I think you can end the script with exit and close the screen. But I haven't tried it so I'm not sure. It may just end the script. Perhaps there is a command to exit a screen from a script? (Edit: It seems some versions of screen automatically close at the end of a script. unix.stackexchange.com/questio…-script-is-done-executing ) If you often need to run commands or scripts you might want to put them in scripts and have them…

  • How to Run a Command in the background

    Adoby - - General

    Post

    You can run screen in the console window first. Then you can run other commands and they will continue to run even if you close the console window. You can re-attach later using screen -r to see if the commands finished. You can type exit to remove the screen. I often use screen. Sometimes in combination with rsync or mc (Midnight Commander) to do big file copying between server. linuxize.com/post/how-to-use-linux-screen/

  • If you have a normal setup you should after a while typically be able to access the web interface on this adress in the web browser: raspberrypi.local This is assuming the install worked OK and you have a working LAN with internet access and DHCP with dnsmasq. If it doesn't work there are several possibilities: The SD card is bad. The install image is bad. The network cable is bad. You need to scan for the ip for the RPi or login to the router to find it. The RPi is not connected to the internet…

  • You don't need a screen to install or use OMV. OMV has a web interface where you can see if it works and configure it and so on. Disconnect everything except the network cable when you try to install. Don't have a screen, USB drive, keyboard or mouse connected. Nothing but the network cable. It is possible that other stuff cause to much power use and the installation fails because of that. Make sure that internet is working properly in your network, with DHCP, using the cable to the RPi, before …

  • Clone Micro SD card fails

    Adoby - - Updates/Upgrades

    Post

    The first dd is OK. But it only reads the very start of the SD card. The low level nitty-gritty binary stuff like MBR, partition table and so on. Then you ALSO need to read the /boot and the / partition as well, as I do in my script using partclone. Those lines are not optional. The second dd is just wrong. I assume that you meant it to be a write to the SD card? But it isn't. It is another read, only with bad parameters. You need to swap the input and the output and so on. And write /boot and /…

  • Clone Micro SD card fails

    Adoby - - Updates/Upgrades

    Post

    Could be a bad card?

  • Clone Micro SD card fails

    Adoby - - Updates/Upgrades

    Post

    Hi! This is how I clone and restore SD cards for my HC2s. Works fine. New to OMV and Linux

  • See: Error 28 - No space left on device See my answer there. Perhaps this is similar to that?

  • Error 28 - No space left on device

    Adoby - - General

    Post

    The root filesystem is the default size on SD cards. I assume that If it is a good SD card wear leveling will distribute wear so that also "unused" parts of the card will contribute to the longevity of the card. I use the same size 7GB rootfs partition on both my 32GB Sandisk Ultra A1 and my new 64 GB Sandisk Extreme A2 cards. So that is most likely fine. About the full rootfs. There has been a number of threads on this forum about rootfs filling up with seemingly invisible content. Typically th…