The Class E Network

    • davidh2k wrote:

      There are also Mesh enabled Versions of APs from them, but they also have something like BT offers:
      It's mesh I'm interested in, the BT option you plug the AP into your router then set up and configure via an app on your phone, unplug the AP from the router and plug into mains in your home then add another. This creates a mesh wireless with it's own SSiD (you can set your passkey), to me this is simple and straight forward. The amplifi is straightforward, plug the base into your router (which I assume you would disable the wifi) then plugin the 2 mesh ap's great piece of kit, but for £320 + to me it's not justifiable.

      At school we use Ruckus which I have been trying to get the school to upgrade, it's getting old and it can struggle with connectivity when everything is in use, but it's still working, so until it dies then it will be changed.
      Raid is not a backup! Would you go skydiving without a parachute?
    • For Mesh its probably the best setup and forget you can get. As a prosumer I personaly would always try to have a wired uplink as this drastically increases the overall throughput on the wifi. But even replacing your routers wifi with an AC AP Pro boosts your wifi drastically and depending on the home, even one could suffice.

      I'd say even the amplifi is well worth the 320 bucks, especially if having two wired APs (if those are even a neccessity) are not an option.

      Greetings
      David
      "Well... lately this forum has become support for everything except omv" [...] "And is like someone is banning Google from their browsers"

      Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former.


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    • I finally got the temporary "rig" to work:
      The path now consists of a Belkin G-54 router (flashed with DD-WRT) <-> an Amped Wireless repeater N-300 (600mw) <-> to a TPLink (flashed with DD-WRT) configured as a wireless client bridge.

      I was surprised to find that the sister-in-law had power in a shed, which also had a slightly better mid-point line-of-site. So I moved the repeater from an insulated window in her house, to the shed. The difference was profound - the link is solid. I can't help but be amazed at the attenuating effect of insulated glass on 2.4Ghz . Putting a wireless Ethernet device on the other side of insulated glass is like putting it behind sheet metal.

      Still, while the local link is sound, the internet connection is terrible. She has satellite internet with a huge amount of latency. It appears to be a double sat-com hop (+600ms) and, if throughput is any indicator, the sub-net she's in is massively oversubscribed.
      _______________________________________________

      davidh2k wrote:

      I'd say even the amplifi is well worth the 320 bucks,
      With the issues in running consumer grade networking equipment, with marginal "just enough" performance, I think it's time to spend a few dollars for Ubiquity wifi at the new house. With @hoppel118 's endorsement, your mention of it, and a bit of research along the way, I haven't found anyone that's unhappy with it. As it seems to me, the GUI console alone is worth a good part of the purchase price.

      The new house is already hardwired but I'm looking at wifi for a barn, a shed and a cabin with distances from the house ranging between 100 to 400'. Ubiquity's long range offerings seem to be a good choice.

      The post was edited 1 time, last by crashtest ().

    • crashtest wrote:

      I can't help but be amazed at the attenuating effect of insulated glass on 2.4Ghz . Putting a wireless Ethernet device on the other side of insulated glass is like putting it behind sheet metal.
      That is interesting, TBH I have not tested wifi outside at our current house since we had replacement windows would be worth a test.

      I still haven't decided about a mesh option, basically I don't need it, but it would extend the 5Ghz network downstairs, as most wireless kit we use is dual band this would be a bonus, it would also allow me to remove the powerplugs. Whilst these are Ok, they have an intermittent habit of disconnecting as one is upstairs and the other downstairs so they are on different circuits and therefore use the distribution board, not ideal but it works.
      Raid is not a backup! Would you go skydiving without a parachute?
    • The Class E Network

      crashtest wrote:

      With the issues in running consumer grade networking equipment, with marginal "just enough" performance, I think it's time to spend a few dollars for Ubiquity wifi at the new house. With @hoppel118 's endorsement, your mention of it, and a bit of research along the way, I haven't found anyone that's unhappy with it. As it seems to me, the GUI console alone is worth a good part of the purchase price.

      The new house is already hardwired but I'm looking at wifi for a barn, a shed and a cabin with distances from the house ranging between 100 to 400'. Ubiquity's long range offerings seem to be a good choice.


      I am still happy with my ubiquti unifi equipment. Didn’t have any wifi problems since the upgrade to unifi. It simply works. :)

      I don’t use mesh or long distance connections. Every ap is hardwired ang is powered over ethernet.

      My equipment:

      1x Unifi Security Gateway
      2x Unifi Switch 8-150W
      3x Unifi AP AC Pro
      1x Unifi Controller LTS in a docker container running on my OMV4 server

      Regards Hoppel
      ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      frontend software - tvos | android tv | libreelec | win10 | kodi krypton
      frontend hardware - appletv 4k | nvidia shield tv | odroid c2 | yamaha rx-a1020 | quadral chromium style 5.1 | samsung le40-a789r2
      -------------------------------------------
      backend software - debian | openmediavault | latest backport kernel | zfs raid-z2 | docker | emby | unifi | vdr | tvheadend | fhem
      backend hardware - supermicro x11ssh-ctf | xeon E3-1240L-v5 | 64gb ecc | 8x10tb wd red | digital devices max s8
      ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    • geaves wrote:

      it would also allow me to remove the powerplugs
      You have power line Ethernet adaptors? I've noticed that surge suppression outlet strips and power panel mounted suppressors, can reduce their performance. The closer the suppressors are to the adapters, the greater the effect seems to be.

      Along similar lines, at the new house, I got an interesting letter from my power company regarding internet access. They asked for the advertised speed from my provider and provided a link to a speed test server to measure actual throughput. With the only options being 15MBS DSL, with the phone company, or ridiculously expensive sat-com, I'd love to see more competition. The cool thing about power line broadband is that the infrastructure is already installed. It's just a matter of adding repeaters.
    • crashtest wrote:

      You have power line Ethernet adaptors
      Just 2, connects upstairs to downstairs, according to the software it's connecting around 200Mbps not great but it's enough to run Kodi downstairs and connect to OMV upstairs.

      I have thought about running ethernet up to loft then down a boxed soil stack into the lounge, or upgrading the powerline adaptors, but I'm still getting drawn to the Mesh wifi option.

      At school we're not using the mesh option on the Rukus as the system uses a zone director in the switch cabinet, each AP can off load to another. That is just too OTT for home use, whereas something like the BT option or the Amplifi would be more suitable.
      Raid is not a backup! Would you go skydiving without a parachute?
    • I threw another wifi router into the mix, on this side of the wireless bridge, so the wife can connect with her laptop. That's 4 devices. It works but it's a ridiculous rig of consumer junk. :rolleyes: It's temporary...

      geaves wrote:

      it's connecting around 200Mbps not great but it's enough to run Kodi downstairs and connect to OMV upstairs.
      Unless one is trying to replicate a server or a share with video files, as in heavy duty file transfers, 100mbs is enough. I like 1G and, eventually, I'll I'll upgrade to 10G, but for the majority of common tasks 100mbs will do it.

      hoppel118 wrote:

      Didn’t have any wifi problems since the upgrade to unifi. It simply works.
      Back in the day, when a project "simply worked" (without the technical drama, fist wringing, emergency meetings, etc.) no one realized how hard it was to make it happen. A lot of attention to detail, read "difficult development work", goes into creating some that simply works. It's worth the extra premium.

      The post was edited 1 time, last by crashtest ().

    • crashtest wrote:

      You have power line Ethernet adaptors?
      My unifi AC pros are connected to my PoE switch - Netgear GS724TP

      crashtest wrote:

      it's a ridiculous rig of consumer junk
      I used to do that as well. Having the unifis is so much easier :)
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    • crashtest wrote:

      With the issues in running consumer grade networking equipment, with marginal "just enough" performance, I think it's time to spend a few dollars for Ubiquity wifi at the new house. With @hoppel118 's endorsement, your mention of it, and a bit of research along the way, I haven't found anyone that's unhappy with it. As it seems to me, the GUI console alone is worth a good part of the purchase price.

      The new house is already hardwired but I'm looking at wifi for a barn, a shed and a cabin with distances from the house ranging between 100 to 400'. Ubiquity's long range offerings seem to be a good choice.
      Glad to hear back when you got your equipment. ;)

      Greetings
      David
      "Well... lately this forum has become support for everything except omv" [...] "And is like someone is banning Google from their browsers"

      Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former.


      Upload Logfile via WebGUI/CLI
      #openmediavault on freenode IRC | German & English | GMT+1
      Absolutely no Support via PM!

      I host parts of the omv-extras.org Repository, the OpenMediaVault Live Demo and the pre-built PXE Images. If you want you can take part and help covering the costs by having a look at my profile page.
    • The Class E Network

      davidh2k wrote:

      Glad to hear back when you got your equipment. ;)


      In the middle of 2017. Why is this interesting for you? :)

      Regards Hoppel
      ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      frontend software - tvos | android tv | libreelec | win10 | kodi krypton
      frontend hardware - appletv 4k | nvidia shield tv | odroid c2 | yamaha rx-a1020 | quadral chromium style 5.1 | samsung le40-a789r2
      -------------------------------------------
      backend software - debian | openmediavault | latest backport kernel | zfs raid-z2 | docker | emby | unifi | vdr | tvheadend | fhem
      backend hardware - supermicro x11ssh-ctf | xeon E3-1240L-v5 | 64gb ecc | 8x10tb wd red | digital devices max s8
      ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    • geaves wrote:

      TBH I have not tested wifi outside at our current house since we had replacement windows would be worth a test.
      It will probably be fine. Wifi is going through three walls on the way to the repeater, at the sister-in-laws. (One of them is an exterior wall with a single brick veneer.) It should work, if you don't set the device right up against the insulated glass and put the 2nd device on the other side. Essentially, that's what I was doing.

      On the other hand, English walls may consist of 6" of plaster and lath, 1 foot of stone and a 3 brick wall, with horse hair in-between for insulation,, so,, I don't know... :D
    • crashtest wrote:

      On the other hand, English walls may consist of 6" of plaster and lath, 1 foot of stone and a 3 brick wall, with horse hair in-between for insulation,, so,, I don't know...
      I think the horse hair is not such a popular choice due to supply and demand :D mind you I'm surprised you didn't throw in a cob wall or two :)
      Raid is not a backup! Would you go skydiving without a parachute?
    • About mesh units.

      I have 3 ASUS Lyra WiFi mesh units. Works fine. And every unit has a couple of ethernet ports. The mesh units can combine the bandwidth so the speed becomes close to twice that between two units. Under optimal conditions (free sight, short distance) I get up to 60MB/s from my OMV NAS:es to a PC with the NAS (via a switch) and the PC both connected to a mesh unit via ethernet. Otherwise, directly to a client over WiFi I can't seem to get more than 30MB/s under optimal circumstances.

      This is fast enough for me to skip cables all over the house.

      I have one mesh unit on top of the book case where my NAS are, the living room. One where my desktop PC is, a "home office". And one in my bedroom. All as close as possible to each other but so that they fully cover the room they are in without obstructions. and they also cover the second floor pretty fine. Wood house...

      Today I might have gone with the GL-iNet mesh units instead.

      I also have a couple of GL-iNet travel routers here and there as access points for IoT stuff. AR150 with only 2.4GHz. They provide much better cover, but also much lower bandwidth.
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