File Structure Hierarchy

    • OMV 4.x

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    • File Structure Hierarchy

      New

      How do I create a file folder hierarchy structure in OMV? I usually get pretty detailed in my Windows 10 Pro file structure. As I created my first virtual machine SMB/CIF network shared file folder I did not really see a way for defining hierarchy. Is there a supported/suggested method? I am using the Sept. 10, 2018 - Rev 1.1 Getting Started with OMV as my beginning teacher.
      Thanks, Kai :thumbup:

      MY OMV OPERATING ENVIRONMENT: Windows 10 Pro 64bit (always latest build) Intel Core 2 Quad Q9550 2.83GHz 8GB ram; OMV 4.1.13-amd64 was installed onto an extra retired machine via VirtualBox v5.2.22 Linux Debian. The Techno Dad Life OMV virtual installation video served as my installation guide. OMV was installed onto a 8GB virtual drive with 3 each 16GB data drives per the video instructions (actually the video shows 3 - 8GB drives, I decided to go with 16GB, don't ask me why).

      My offering to the technical world: The great thing about being a NOOB is - I'll always be a NOOB - because every day I'll learn something that I didn't know an hour earlier, and sometimes - many times over all in the same day. That said, I'll never grow old with OMV.
    • New

      You typically have one or more shared folder, possibly with different types of access. Then you just create subfolders as you see fit. You can base your structure on type of media, name, author creation date, publisher or whatever you want to use to find the files.

      Many use media scrapers to automatically identify, rename and reorganize media. I use Tiny Media Manager, MusicBrainz Picard and calibre e-book manager.

      I use four subfolders trees, based on how I back them up.

      Shared important media. Daily backups using multiple methods and remote destinations.
      Shared media. Daily rsync snapshots to one other NAS.
      Local media. No backups. Mostly junk. May be deleted.
      Backups and snapshots. From other NAS. Already backups.

      You can also link to folders.

      That way you can create a folder BackupDaily that contains all the folders that you want to backup daily. But they also are elsewhere, based on type of media instead of the backup frequency.
      OMV 4, 5 x ODROID HC2, 2 x 12TB, 2 x 8 TB, 1 x 500 GB SSD, GbE, WiFi mesh
    • New

      Thanks for the reply Adoby.

      Thanks for your file tree design instructions/advice. I seem to have no problem in designing a file tree structure. I have had that practice well in place for 15 years. I just have missed something in doing a file tree in OMV. I was mainly having trouble determining how in OMV to create subfolders. It didn't really hit me in the face as I was learning to create a network share. Would you mind pointing out what step of 'creating a network shared folder/subfolder' I should be paying closer attention to?
      Thanks, Kai :thumbup:

      MY OMV OPERATING ENVIRONMENT: Windows 10 Pro 64bit (always latest build) Intel Core 2 Quad Q9550 2.83GHz 8GB ram; OMV 4.1.13-amd64 was installed onto an extra retired machine via VirtualBox v5.2.22 Linux Debian. The Techno Dad Life OMV virtual installation video served as my installation guide. OMV was installed onto a 8GB virtual drive with 3 each 16GB data drives per the video instructions (actually the video shows 3 - 8GB drives, I decided to go with 16GB, don't ask me why).

      My offering to the technical world: The great thing about being a NOOB is - I'll always be a NOOB - because every day I'll learn something that I didn't know an hour earlier, and sometimes - many times over all in the same day. That said, I'll never grow old with OMV.
    • New

      I understand your reply. I accept your direction. I have been using the manual but I evidently have overlooked something in the manual that getsd closer to the topic of hierarchy. That is what I was trying to gain assistance with. I will study the manual once again to see if 'hierarchy' is brought more to my attention.
      Thanks, Kai :thumbup:

      MY OMV OPERATING ENVIRONMENT: Windows 10 Pro 64bit (always latest build) Intel Core 2 Quad Q9550 2.83GHz 8GB ram; OMV 4.1.13-amd64 was installed onto an extra retired machine via VirtualBox v5.2.22 Linux Debian. The Techno Dad Life OMV virtual installation video served as my installation guide. OMV was installed onto a 8GB virtual drive with 3 each 16GB data drives per the video instructions (actually the video shows 3 - 8GB drives, I decided to go with 16GB, don't ask me why).

      My offering to the technical world: The great thing about being a NOOB is - I'll always be a NOOB - because every day I'll learn something that I didn't know an hour earlier, and sometimes - many times over all in the same day. That said, I'll never grow old with OMV.
    • New

      As you are using SMB/CIFS you might have one shared folder which is added to that service.
      Then within the shared folder you have the same folder structure as on your Windows. You can create it for example by using Windows File Explorer from your Windows computer.
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    • New

      One hierarchy is

      Disk
      Filesystem
      Shared folder
      Service

      You maybe wipe a disk. You format and/or mount one or more filesystems on that disk. You create one or more shared folders in the filesystem. Then you add/configure one or more services that use that shared folder to provide a network share. Several services can use the same shared folder. For instance a shared folder may be shared using SMB/CIFS, NFS and ftp, all at the same time. Then you can access the shared folder from a client.

      This hierarchy is partly based on how computers/Linux works and partly how things are organized/split up in the OMV GUI.


      OMV 4, 5 x ODROID HC2, 2 x 12TB, 2 x 8 TB, 1 x 500 GB SSD, GbE, WiFi mesh

      The post was edited 1 time, last by Adoby ().

    • New

      macom wrote:

      As you are using SMB/CIFS you might have one shared folder which is added to that service.
      Then within the shared folder you have the same folder structure as on your Windows. You can create it for example by using Windows File Explorer from your Windows computer.
      BINGO!!!! :thumbsup: Now that's what I'm talking about!

      As a beginner to OMV I was merely under the impression that all structure was achieved within the OMV platform/procedures. I never thought to use the standard Windows procedures for the hierarchy. I was always tunnel visioned into assuming everything needing to be done inside OMV. The manual never provided reference to my confusion. (At least I never saw any reference).

      macom, THANK YOU VERY MUCH.
      Thanks, Kai :thumbup:

      MY OMV OPERATING ENVIRONMENT: Windows 10 Pro 64bit (always latest build) Intel Core 2 Quad Q9550 2.83GHz 8GB ram; OMV 4.1.13-amd64 was installed onto an extra retired machine via VirtualBox v5.2.22 Linux Debian. The Techno Dad Life OMV virtual installation video served as my installation guide. OMV was installed onto a 8GB virtual drive with 3 each 16GB data drives per the video instructions (actually the video shows 3 - 8GB drives, I decided to go with 16GB, don't ask me why).

      My offering to the technical world: The great thing about being a NOOB is - I'll always be a NOOB - because every day I'll learn something that I didn't know an hour earlier, and sometimes - many times over all in the same day. That said, I'll never grow old with OMV.