help needed to install on raspberrypi 3b+

    • jhussain wrote:

      My question is still why my second sd card gave me a public ip address rather than the dhcp assigned ip from my router?
      The OMV image for Raspberries is configured for DHCP so you either get an address from within the 169.254.x.x range (a so called link-local address) or an address provided by an DHCP server. If your OMV server now has an 75.25.xxx.xxx address for your Windows box to be able to access it there must be a route to this address too (usually an 75.25.xxx.xxx address will be routed to the Internet).

      Wild guesses are useless so please provide full output from these two commands entered in cmd.exe on Windows:

      Source Code

      1. ipconfig /all
      2. ping raspberrypi

      Post by crashtest ().

      This post was deleted by the author themselves: dup ().
    • tkaiser wrote:

      The real problem is that certain guides and tutorials written for newbies miss the most important step when setting up OMV: that's defining at least one normal user account in the OMV UI and using this user then to access shares.
      This is much like the notions very experienced users may have, when their unconscious biases may make them think that their personal approaches are "very important steps" for beginners when, in fact, they're not.

      (Just a thought. :) )

      The post was edited 2 times, last by crashtest ().

    • crashtest wrote:

      tkaiser wrote:

      The real problem is that certain guides and tutorials written for newbies miss the most important step when setting up OMV: that's defining at least one normal user account in the OMV UI and using this user then to access shares.
      This is much like the notions some experienced users may have, when their unconscious biases that make them think that their personal approaches are "very important steps" for beginners when, in fact, they're not.
      (Just a thought. :) )
      I setup multiple user accounts, and assigned users per shares, so the kids could have their own personal folders on the nas. (Sisters cant see each others, but I see all, lol)
      Is it crazy how saying sentences backwards creates backwards sentences saying how crazy it is?
    • contr0l wrote:

      I setup multiple user accounts, and assigned users per shares, so the kids could have their own personal folders on the nas. (Sisters cant see each others, but I see all, lol)
      Very good. That's the ultimate goal and, as the admin, you should have access to all. :) (I'm going to assume you're a Dad or an older brother, so knowing what the youngsters are up to is a very good idea.)
      But many beginners have very little to no concept of users and permissions. I'm in the process of writing a permissions addendum to the Getting Started Guide but, as it is with most things, making the topic seem simple to the broadest possible audience, takes a bit of work.

      The post was edited 1 time, last by crashtest ().

      Post by contr0l ().

      This post was deleted by the author themselves ().
    • crashtest wrote:

      contr0l wrote:

      I setup multiple user accounts, and assigned users per shares, so the kids could have their own personal folders on the nas. (Sisters cant see each others, but I see all, lol)
      Very good. That's the ultimate goal and, as the admin, you should have access to all. :) (I'm going to assume you're a Dad or an older brother, so knowing what the youngsters are up to is a very good idea.) But many beginners have very little concept of users and permissions.I'm in the process of writing a permissions addendum to the Getting Started Guide but, as it is with most things, making the topic seem simple, to a broad audience, takes a bit of work.
      Please refer them to the Privileges before the ACLs, lol. (That was a lot easier to setup) I had so many problems until I found that out, lol. And you're assumption was correct; Father of 2 girls.
      Is it crazy how saying sentences backwards creates backwards sentences saying how crazy it is?

      Post by contr0l ().

      This post was deleted by the author themselves ().
    • crashtest wrote:

      This is much like the notions very experienced users may have, when their unconscious biases may make them think that their personal approaches are "very important steps" for beginners when, in fact, they're not.
      At least you realized yourself that your usual take on access problems (create same user as on Windows) doesn't work here (now if you would only understand that this is in general a bad idea):


      It's important to care about details and you really should start with this (and please take the many issues with your guide seriously. BTW: your childish try to hide the remarks doesn't work -- people with normal eyesight can differentiate between a white font and a light grey background). Also if you are now talking about 'writing a permissions addendum to the Getting Started Guide' I fear you still didn't get the basics.

      Since @votdev is not an idiot the OMV defaults are pretty fine for share access with several users. And OMV administrators do not need to fiddle around with permissions if they just want to access the same shares. The important details are:
      1. Users need to be created via the OMV UI since only this ensures that their primary group is users and that they got Samba password hashes.
      2. The other OMV defaults are already sufficient for a setup created by 1)
      3. In situations where Windows doesn't ask for Logon Credentials (Windows 10) there is the Credentials Manager solving this problem
      4. Windows implements fallback attempts to authenticate with guest logon when an authenticated logon fails (this is the root cause of so much confusion here in the forum)
      5. It's easy to diagnose access problems but this requires looking into the logs (which is easy with OMV since again... @votdev isn't an idiot)
      No need to touch permissions at all unless the user in question already fiddled around manually. As such no need to even mention permissions as long as users are aware that they always need to create one or several user accounts first. If this good practice could be established in general an awful lot of authentication and permissions problems would already be resolved or not existing.

      Before you are able to write a permissions guide you should be able to spot the difference between an authentication and a permissions problem. And @contr0l is right: if you ever touch permissions then mention ACLs only as last resort. Dealing with group memberships, POSIX permissions and the way Samba enforces permissions is sufficient for majority of use cases (but all of this is quite different to the way Windows deals with these things so it needs a true understanding of the differences first. POSIX/Samba != Windows).

      But the good news is: due to great OMV defaults dealing with sophisticated permissions situations is not necessary anyway as long as OMV users are taught to create users first in the UI.

      The post was edited 1 time, last by tkaiser ().

    • TL:DR

      Even if the user is "Administrator", "Peter", "Frank" or "Paul", with the exact same workstation logon username + password installed in OMV, the user will get transparent access to access to shared folders, where the users group has at least read, from the same workstation. Simple.

      The only time the Credential Manager makes sense is, when a user name (and password) are not recognized by the remote server or other network resource. The CM is for the "exceptions". It wasn't intended to a best practices "rule".

      *Edit: "Admin", "Backup", and other system users can't be used for Windows Logon's because they conflict with existing Linux system users.*

      Done here.

      The post was edited 3 times, last by crashtest: edit ().

    • Currently it seems you're the most ignorant person on this forum.

      crashtest wrote:

      Even if the user is "Administrator", "Admin", "Peter", "Frank" or "Paul", with the exact same workstation logon username + password installed in OMV, the user will get transparent access to access to shared folders, where the users group has at least read, from the same workstation. Simple
      OMV's 'admin' account is a special account, it's not meant to be used for share access. If anyone tries to add 'admin' to OMV's users and groups this happens:


      It's impossible. But adding an user via the OMV UI is important since otherwise authentication via Samba will not be possible anyway as I already tried to explain to you (last time in this thread). So no, what you suggested simply can not work. And with your arrogant 'TL:DR' attitude you prevent even other users helping you to learn OMV basics. How to deal with such a behavior?

      Instead of learning something new (how to setup users/groups accordingly) you insist being right promoting methods that definitely can not work and that are also 'bad practice' (doing day-to-day work as 'admin').

      Given how much time you spend here on the forum and writing tutorials it would be really great if you would be able to learn (healing your ignorance then of course as first step).
    • tkaiser wrote:

      Currently it seems you're the most ignorant person on this forum.
      Without ever being a windows user, and in try to prove something to the world, that honor is distinctly yours. As has been noted before, there are many levels of "ignorance", most of which have nothing to do with tech. (But, strangely, I believe you're aware of this, and of certain "challenges".)

      The rest? Again - TL:DR. Really, I don't have time for this tragedy. Last post - no longer watched - but feel free to babble on and on.
    • Thanks to everyone for helping me out on my issues.

      I was finally able to get the omv installed properly and get it going. It is working fine now.

      My other question is: If I have a HD with few folders. How can I mount the whole drive without going through setting up each folder as shared folder? This will take a long time if there are too many folders.
    • jhussain wrote:

      I was finally able to get the omv installed properly and get it going. It is working fine now.
      How?

      jhussain wrote:

      If I have a HD with few folders. How can I mount the whole drive without going through setting up each folder as shared folder?
      Are all these folders on the base of the drive? Then you would have to create a shared folder for each of the folders on the base of the drive.

      You could try to use just "/" as the path.
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    • Or create one single folder to share them all. And then move the other folders to inside that folder. Then you only need one share to share everything.

      A side benefit is that everything will be in the same filesystem. So you can move stuff around instantaneously within that filesystem.
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