Network Credentials

    • A lot of information is missing - like how your shares are set up, the OS used at the client you're connecting from (I'm going to assume it's Windows), etc. (In any case)

      Assuming you already have network shares set up, have you created a user in OMV?

      Go into Access Rights Management, User.
      Under User, create a username and password that exactly matches the username and password, cap's and all, that you use to logon to your Windows Client. Save the user and, from the same Windows Client, try connecting again,
    • In OMV you specify who and how you can connect to OMV. It may be as a certain user with a certain password. Or it may be open for guests.

      If you don't know exactly how to connect you have most likely skipped this step. Check the documentation.
      OMV 4, 7 x ODROID HC2, 1 x ODROID HC1, 5 x 12TB, 1 x 8TB, 1 x 2TB SSHD, 1 x 2TB SSD, GbE, WiFi mesh
    • A few pieces of information are missing from your side: which Windows version are you running and which OMV version?

      Then some information that might be important for what you're experiencing
      • If you have user accounts on your OMV box that were not created via the OMV UI then logging in from Windows with these logon credentials will always fail. The reason is that Samba (fileserver component for Windows) needs own password hashes and OMV is adjusting them using Samba's smbpasswd command. So if there are user accounts on the box for which passwords have not been assigned by OMV already (since OMV has been installed later for example) then you need to either call smbpasswd for them or better use the OMV UI to set the passwords again
      • Certain Windows versions do not allow to correctly specify logon credentials since they for whatever reasons try to authenticate with the local Windows user. Then you need to use 'Credential Manager' on the Windows box to provide correct logon credentials (details). But it seems you're not affected since Windows is asking you to provide logon credentials.
      • Logon attempts from Windows might implement fallback behavior which is a constant source of confusion. If an authenticated logon fails Windows tries to establish the connection again with a guest logon. Since guest logons are about to be banned by every operating system out there users who were formerly thinking they would use authenticated logon in reality just used guest logons which now fail with same symptoms as wrong logon credentials
      Therefore it's important to always start with setting up user accounts first. Unfortunately many guides/tutorials still miss this important step.

      Diagnosing such credential problems and getting a clue what's really going on is easy with OMV
      • Adjust 'Log level' from None to Normal in the SMB/CIFS settings tab and save
      • in OMV UI then go to Diagnostics --> System Logs --> Syslog (default log displayed)
      • Connect from a Windows box to OMV
      • Back in OMV UI klick the refresh button at the bottom
      You now can simply watch what really happened, whether Windows is trying with an unknown account, whether password was wrong and so on. It's really easy to diagnose problems on Linux and OMV once you know where to look.

      In the below screenshot you see the refresh button at the bottom and that authentication succeeded as user John (OMV user not the local Windows user account):



      If you're done troubleshooting you might want to adjust 'Log level' back to 'None'.