ASRock J4105 [Macbook Wifi Slow]

    • OMV 4.x
    • Resolved
    • ASRock J4105 Ethernet Slow

      Hi all,

      I have the ASRock J4105 motherboard and running OMV (Version 4.1.22-1(Arrakis)) and it's great so far! Kernel: Linux 4.9.0-9-amd64

      I just have an issue with my Realtek Ethernet driver on the J4105. The ethernet speeds are pretty slow. I have blacklisted the r8169 driver as per instructions on various sites and I have installed latest R8168 driver version “8.047.01-NAPI” that is the latest version from Realtek's website but still getting really slow speeds. Please note I also tried a few earlier versions of the driver and also had slow speeds.


      EDIT: SOLVED! (the issue was not Realtek driver on J4105, but my Macbook Pro's Wi-Fi)


      I tested with iperf3 between my Macbook Pro connected on 802.11ac 5Ghz (via Netgear R7000 router and the OMV server connected to that with a CAT6 ethernet cable) and the maximum bandwidth I’m getting is 15.8 Mbits/sec.

      Any thoughts/suggestions?



      root@mynas:~# sudo ethtool -i enp3s0
      driver: r8168
      version: 8.047.01-NAPI
      firmware-version:
      expansion-rom-version:
      bus-info: 0000:03:00.0
      supports-statistics: yes
      supports-test: no
      supports-eeprom-access: no
      supports-register-dump: yes
      supports-priv-flags: no



      Source Code

      1. root@mynas:~# dmesg | grep r8168
      2. [ 1.803756] r8168: loading out-of-tree module taints kernel.
      3. [ 1.804716] r8168 Gigabit Ethernet driver 8.043.02-NAPI loaded
      4. [ 1.821677] r8168: This product is covered by one or more of the following patents: US6,570,884, US6,115,776, and US6,327,625.
      5. [ 1.821685] r8168 Copyright (C) 2016 Realtek NIC software team <nicfae@realtek.com>
      6. [ 1.875706] r8168 0000:03:00.0 enp3s0: renamed from eth0
      7. [ 7.876413] r8168: enp3s0: link up
      8. [ 145.004238] r8168 Gigabit Ethernet driver 8.043.02-NAPI loaded
      9. [ 145.019578] r8168: This product is covered by one or more of the following patents: US6,570,884, US6,115,776, and US6,327,625.
      10. [ 145.019585] r8168 Copyright (C) 2016 Realtek NIC software team <nicfae@realtek.com>
      11. [ 145.021816] r8168 0000:03:00.0 enp3s0: renamed from eth0
      12. [ 148.229961] r8168: enp3s0: link up
      13. [ 759.819772] r8168 Gigabit Ethernet driver 8.047.01-NAPI loaded
      14. [ 759.834962] r8168: This product is covered by one or more of the following patents: US6,570,884, US6,115,776, and US6,327,625.
      15. [ 759.835038] r8168 Copyright (C) 2019 Realtek NIC software team <nicfae@realtek.com>
      16. [ 759.836940] r8168 0000:03:00.0 enp3s0: renamed from eth0
      17. [ 763.242319] r8168: enp3s0: link up
      Display All





      Thanks,
      Conor

      The post was edited 1 time, last by conorlap ().

    • conorlap wrote:

      I tested with iperf3 between my Macbook Pro connected on 802.11ac 5Ghz (via Netgear R7000 router and the OMV server connected to that with a CAT6 ethernet cable) and the maximum bandwidth I’m getting is 15.8 Mbits/sec
      In other words: you're not complaining about 'Ethernet Slow' but 'wireless slow', right?

      Is your Ethernet throughput slow? If you've only a recent MacBook Pro I would suggest buying an USB-C Ethernet dongle with RTL8153 chipset (the major brands selling adapters at a premium price all rely on this chip since it's the best available for USB3 GbE).
      No more contributions to this project until 'alternative facts' (AKA ignorance/stupidity) are gone
    • Hi tkaiser,

      Thanks for your reply. It's a Late 2013 15" Retina Macbook Pro, it's connected to 801.11ac Wi-Fi on 5Ghz and is right beside the router with full signal so I would expect that bandwidth should definitely be greater than approx 15.8 Mbits/sec between the Mac and OMV server. The Wi-Fi menu on my Mac shows a TX rate of 1300Mbps on the Wi-Fi.

      All this leads me to suspect it's something about the driver on my OMV server - is there any other ways I can test bandwidth? / other checks I can do? I don't currently have a USB to Ethernet adapter for my Mac but could look into purchasing one as a last resort, however I want to try all other options first.

      Thanks,
      Conor
    • conorlap wrote:

      All this leads me to suspect it's something about the driver on my OMV server
      Why? Currently you have no idea about Ethernet speeds at all and most probably just stumbled across some distracting RealTek bashing on the net. J4105 with 8111G or 8111H and a stock Debian is known to saturate Gigabit Ethernet and these Wi-Fi signal rates are mostly marketing BS (wi-fi signal rate vs real world througput).

      With an older MacBook Pro like yours most probably Apple's Thunderbolt to Ethernet adapter is a better idea (lower latencies) and to diagnose wireless problems I always found NetSpot to be a great tool.
      No more contributions to this project until 'alternative facts' (AKA ignorance/stupidity) are gone
    • Hi tkaiser,

      I just would imagine that the Wi-Fi (even if nowhere near Gigabit speeds) on my Macbook would still allow transfer speeds much greater than approx 15.8 Mbits/sec. Nonetheless, I have sourced a USB 3 to Ethernet adapter on Amazon and will test that out in the coming days and see how that goes.

      Thanks!
      Conor
    • conorlap wrote:

      It's a Late 2013 15" Retina Macbook Pro, it's connected to 801.11ac Wi-Fi on 5Ghz
      The Macbook from late 2013 has 801.11ac? I thought the standard was only released end of 2013.
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    • conorlap wrote:

      I just would imagine that the Wi-Fi (even if nowhere near Gigabit speeds) on my Macbook would still allow transfer speeds much greater than approx 15.8 Mbits/sec
      Yes, should happen. But Wi-Fi means shared medium so if you're not living alone in the wilderness wireless performance is up to your neighbors and not you. With my setup (2017 MBP against a 802.11ac router capable of 3x3 MIMO) I get this:

      Source Code

      1. mac-tk-2018:~ tk$ iperf3 -c rockpro64
      2. Connecting to host rockpro64, port 5201
      3. [ 7] local 192.168.83.43 port 50987 connected to 192.168.83.135 port 5201
      4. [ ID] Interval Transfer Bitrate
      5. [ 7] 0.00-1.00 sec 12.2 MBytes 102 Mbits/sec
      6. [ 7] 1.00-2.00 sec 14.1 MBytes 118 Mbits/sec
      7. [ 7] 2.00-3.00 sec 17.5 MBytes 147 Mbits/sec
      8. [ 7] 3.00-4.00 sec 16.7 MBytes 140 Mbits/sec
      9. [ 7] 4.00-5.00 sec 17.5 MBytes 147 Mbits/sec
      10. [ 7] 5.00-6.00 sec 16.0 MBytes 134 Mbits/sec
      11. [ 7] 6.00-7.00 sec 17.8 MBytes 149 Mbits/sec
      12. [ 7] 7.00-8.00 sec 16.5 MBytes 139 Mbits/sec
      13. [ 7] 8.00-9.00 sec 17.9 MBytes 150 Mbits/sec
      14. [ 7] 9.00-10.00 sec 16.2 MBytes 136 Mbits/sec
      15. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
      16. [ ID] Interval Transfer Bitrate
      17. [ 7] 0.00-10.00 sec 162 MBytes 136 Mbits/sec sender
      18. [ 7] 0.00-10.00 sec 162 MBytes 136 Mbits/sec receiver
      19. iperf Done.
      20. mac-tk-2018:~ tk$ iperf3 -R -c rockpro64
      21. Connecting to host rockpro64, port 5201
      22. Reverse mode, remote host rockpro64 is sending
      23. [ 7] local 192.168.83.43 port 50989 connected to 192.168.83.135 port 5201
      24. [ ID] Interval Transfer Bitrate
      25. [ 7] 0.00-1.00 sec 43.3 MBytes 363 Mbits/sec
      26. [ 7] 1.00-2.00 sec 38.9 MBytes 326 Mbits/sec
      27. [ 7] 2.00-3.00 sec 39.4 MBytes 330 Mbits/sec
      28. [ 7] 3.00-4.00 sec 38.2 MBytes 321 Mbits/sec
      29. [ 7] 4.00-5.00 sec 36.6 MBytes 307 Mbits/sec
      30. [ 7] 5.00-6.00 sec 36.5 MBytes 306 Mbits/sec
      31. [ 7] 6.00-7.00 sec 35.8 MBytes 300 Mbits/sec
      32. [ 7] 7.00-8.00 sec 41.2 MBytes 346 Mbits/sec
      33. [ 7] 8.00-9.00 sec 39.3 MBytes 330 Mbits/sec
      34. [ 7] 9.00-10.00 sec 40.7 MBytes 341 Mbits/sec
      35. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
      36. [ ID] Interval Transfer Bitrate Retr
      37. [ 7] 0.00-10.00 sec 392 MBytes 329 Mbits/sec 0 sender
      38. [ 7] 0.00-10.00 sec 390 MBytes 327 Mbits/sec receiver
      39. iperf Done.
      Display All
      But here in my area only 2.4 GHz is totally overcrowded but 5 GHz still ok (only little interference) and my MBP is capable of 3x3 MIMO too:




      conorlap wrote:

      I have sourced a USB 3 to Ethernet adapter on Amazon
      I hope you followed the RTL8153 chipset recommendation. Best performance and no driver hassles (driver being part of every major OS, in OS X it appeared in 10.8). Since you're in DE I would recommend CSL for such stuff, e.g. amazon.de/dp/B07FK1NLCX/

      macom wrote:

      The Macbook from late 2013 has 801.11ac? I thought the standard was only released end of 2013
      Apple also started to ship with 802.11n when the standard wasn't final. In fact there were over 2.5 years in between first Apple product with 802.11n and final specs. That's what firmware updates are for.
      No more contributions to this project until 'alternative facts' (AKA ignorance/stupidity) are gone
    • Yeah I made sure to get one with RTL8153 LAN Chipset, thanks for the recommendation! :)


      As you can see from attached screenshot, there's good signal and nothing else in the vicinity on the 5Ghz 108 channel (My Wi-Fi is "YesTwo-5G")
      Images
      • Screenshot 2019-05-31 at 11.55.45.png

        107.85 kB, 738×346, viewed 25 times
    • Hi all,

      Just an update to let you know I got the Gigabit ethernet problem sorted, I am able to get Gigabit speeds now with a USB 3.0 to Ethernet adapter on my Macbook Pro! Now the only bottleneck in my setup are Netgear PL1200 Powerline adapters that I use! They only let me get about 300mb/s speed but this will do me fine for now!

      Thanks for your help, I'm loving OpenMediaVault and this entire experience of learning and building my home media server!
      Conor
    • It would be great if you could adjust the thread title and update your first post with a link to a final conclusion below. The reason is to save further victims of RealTek bashing some time since your whole issue wasn't related to Ethernet or 'the low quality' of RealTek drivers but simply Wi-Fi being the sh*t show it is today in crowded areas.
      No more contributions to this project until 'alternative facts' (AKA ignorance/stupidity) are gone