What is the difference between OMV shared folders and windows, synology shared folders?

    • OMV 4.x
    • What is the difference between OMV shared folders and windows, synology shared folders?

      What is the difference between OMV shared folders and windows, synology shared folders?

      My Android TV player can access the shared folder of Windows normally, and can also access the shared folder of Synology NAS normally, but can't access the shared folder of OMV.

      In addition, I also tried to use SAMBA to set up shared folders on raspberrypi. My windows can access shared folders on Pi, but my TV player can't access Pi's shared folders.I tried to find the error log on OMV, but I didn't find it.

      So I come here for help and find out why this is.

      My TV player version is Android 4.2.2
    • As I see it.

      A shared folder in OMV is a subfolder that can be referenced and "shared" between various services and functions in OMV. Some of these services are networking protocols that can actually share the folder on the network. Some are more internal functions.

      Shared folders can be seen as building blocks for telling OMV what to do and with what. They don't do much until they are combined with / referenced by a service. The services are the other building block. A service describes "what to do" and the shared folder describes "with what" it is done. Verb and subject.

      For instance a shared folder can be created to be used as the docker base path. This folder is only used by the docker GUI and the docker images. It is not shared on the network.

      Another shared folder might be used to create a network share by activating for instance SMB/CIFS and reference the shared folder from that service. The same shared folder might also be referenced by NFS and/or a backup plugin.

      This way of configuring a NAS is (I think) very specific for OMV. Just as how it similar things are done in windows is specific for windows and how it is done in Synology is specific for Synology.

      Sometimes OMV makes a lot of sense and is very helpful. I use OMV to configure users, access rights, shares and docker. But I don't use it to configure backups, remote mounts or scheduled events.

      Since OMV is built on top of Debian it is often (but not always) possible to use Debian, scripts and the command line to do stuff, instead of using OMV. This is something I really like about OMV.

      So I use autofs, cron, the command line and various scripts outside of the OMV GUI when I feel more comfortable with that.

      To use the OMV GUI you need to know about how for instance SMB shares need to be configured and how access can be restricted or allowed, depending on the user trying to connect. The GUI might help a little but you need to know what you want to do.

      Otherwise you are like a monkey hammering away randomly on a keyboard trying to write the collected works of Shakespeare.
      OMV 4: 9 x Odroid HC2 + 1 x Odroid HC1 + 1 x Raspberry Pi 4

      The post was edited 1 time, last by Adoby ().

    • cabrio_leo wrote:

      jason2019 wrote:

      What is the difference between OMV shared folders and windows, synology shared folders?
      I assume that you mean Samba (SMB/CIFS) shared folders primarily, isn´t it?
      Yes,

      I have been using OMV for some years, and I started with version 3. But it is only used to back up files, because the old computer with OMV installed consumes about 100W, so it only turns on when the file is backed up, so I didn't use TV player to access OMV before.
    • Adoby wrote:

      As I see it.

      A shared folder in OMV is a subfolder that can be referenced and "shared" between various services and functions in OMV. Some of these services are networking protocols that can actually share the folder on the network. Some are more internal functions.

      Shared folders can be seen as building blocks for telling OMV what to do and with what. They don't do much until they are combined with / referenced by a service. The services are the other building block. A service describes "what to do" and the shared folder describes "with what" it is done. Verb and subject.

      For instance a shared folder can be created to be used as the docker base path. This folder is only used by the docker GUI and the docker images. It is not shared on the network.

      Another shared folder might be used to create a network share by activating for instance SMB/CIFS and reference the shared folder from that service. The same shared folder might also be referenced by NFS and/or a backup plugin.

      This way of configuring a NAS is (I think) very specific for OMV. Just as how it similar things are done in windows is specific for windows and how it is done in Synology is specific for Synology.

      Sometimes OMV makes a lot of sense and is very helpful. I use OMV to configure users, access rights, shares and docker. But I don't use it to configure backups, remote mounts or scheduled events.

      Since OMV is built on top of Debian it is often (but not always) possible to use Debian, scripts and the command line to do stuff, instead of using OMV. This is something I really like about OMV.

      So I use autofs, cron, the command line and various scripts outside of the OMV GUI when I feel more comfortable with that.

      To use the OMV GUI you need to know about how for instance SMB shares need to be configured and how access can be restricted or allowed, depending on the user trying to connect. The GUI might help a little but you need to know what you want to do.

      Otherwise you are like a monkey hammering away randomly on a keyboard trying to write the collected works of Shakespeare.
      I have been using OMV for a long time, just using windows to access, no problems. I have two old computers with OMV installed. One has a 4TBx6 HDD and the other has a 2TBx6 HDD. It has been working very well. I also use a synology 8TBx4 HDD.
    • jason2019 wrote:

      GeekGrrl wrote:

      The android player might be seeing what's called DLNA... which is a plug in for OMV.
      I use this player to access windows shared folder and synology shared folder without any issue. I didn't install any DLNA service.
      DLNA is built into windows, no installation required. I'm not familiar with the Synology software but I wouldn't be surprised if it had DLNA built in as well. enabling that service allowed my dad's roku to see the shared media folders on the OMV box I set up for him.

      Windows doesn't call it DLNA, synology may not as well but here's a link on how it's set up on windows. howtogeek.com/215400/how-to-tu…into-a-dlna-media-server/
    • GeekGrrl wrote:

      jason2019 wrote:

      GeekGrrl wrote:

      The android player might be seeing what's called DLNA... which is a plug in for OMV.
      I use this player to access windows shared folder and synology shared folder without any issue. I didn't install any DLNA service.
      DLNA is built into windows, no installation required. I'm not familiar with the Synology software but I wouldn't be surprised if it had DLNA built in as well. enabling that service allowed my dad's roku to see the shared media folders on the OMV box I set up for him.
      Windows doesn't call it DLNA, synology may not as well but here's a link on how it's set up on windows. howtogeek.com/215400/how-to-tu…into-a-dlna-media-server/
      I did not turn on the media streaming in my Windows computer. I just make a shared folder
    • Adoby wrote:

      From your description the OMV share sounds fine. You can access it from windows.

      So it is the TV client that is the problem. How it access the OMV share. How does the TV access differ from the window access? User and password and guest and so on?
      The Android TV player have LAN setting. It need the ip address , share folder name, user name and password.


    • I think that you are using the wrong name for the directory. It should be the same as the name of the shared folder. Or did you call the OMV shared folder in MYNAS?

      If pi samba worked in windows it is fine. It is working. It is you that are messing up the name of the directory, ip, user and password and so on.
      OMV 4: 9 x Odroid HC2 + 1 x Odroid HC1 + 1 x Raspberry Pi 4
    • Adoby wrote:

      I think that you are using the wrong name for the directory. It should be the same as the name of the shared folder. Or did you call the OMV shared folder in MYNAS?

      If pi samba worked in windows it is fine. It is working. It is you that are messing up the name of the directory, ip, user and password and so on.

      I am very sure that the issue is not a wrong directory name. There is not OMV shared folder now. I deleted it. The OMV shared folder and RaspberryPi shared folder are all work fine in my windows computer.

    • Adoby wrote:

      Well, if the OMV share is OK in windows, then it is obviously OK. Working. Then it isn't OMV that is the problem but how you connect to the share from the TV.
      The correct path. The right user and password. The right direction of the slashes. The spelling.
      There is no spelling issue.

      IP, path, username, password are all no spelling issue.


      I have checked it very carefully and will not make such a simple mistake.
    • OMV, Raspberry Pi and Synology are all based on Linux. The shared folders set by these three devices can be accessed normally under Windows. From the TV player, the first two can't be accessed, and Synology can do it. I believe that all three devices use the samba service. Their difference must exist in the deeper samba settings or versions.
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