access denied during visual basic debugging

    • OMV 4.x
    • Maybe because the filesystems that contain the shared folders are mounted noexec flag.
      Absolutely no support through PM!

      I must not fear.
      Fear is the mind-killer.
      Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration.
      I will face my fear.
      I will permit it to pass over me and through me.
      And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path.
      Where the fear has gone there will be nothing.
      Only I will remain.

      Litany against fear by Bene Gesserit
    • This is the default in OMV (because of security). You need to modify the /etc/openmediavault/config.xml datatabse. Search the forum how to do that and how to apply the changes.
      Absolutely no support through PM!

      I must not fear.
      Fear is the mind-killer.
      Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration.
      I will face my fear.
      I will permit it to pass over me and through me.
      And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path.
      Where the fear has gone there will be nothing.
      Only I will remain.

      Litany against fear by Bene Gesserit
    • You might want to consider teaching the pupils to use some form of version control?

      And then you can use the OMV server as the central code repository.

      When code is to be tested or debugged it first would have to be checked out, perhaps t
      to a local drive without noexec.
      OMV 4: 9 x Odroid HC2 + 1 x Odroid HC1 + 1 x Raspberry Pi 4
    • Adoby wrote:

      You might want to consider teaching the pupils to use some form of version control?

      And then you can use the OMV server as the central code repository.

      When code is to be tested or debugged it first would have to be checked out, perhaps t
      to a local drive without noexec.
      if I understand correctly, you are discouraging me from removing this default security setting. And I agree with you. So could you create a separate debug environment? how? Creating a new filesytem on omv?
    • The "correct" way to do this is to setup some version control server with a centralized repository.

      It can be on a OMV NAS. Or it can be on GitHub or GitLab or some other cloud version control server. There are plenty of free options. Not necessarily using Git. But Git is a very popular version control system currently. And it is free and it is available for Debian, so you can install it on a OMV NAS.

      And there are many, many tutorials and many free tools for using Git.

      Then, whenever a pupil want to do some coding/debugging they have to check out the code from the version control server repository to a local folder on their client computer.

      As the pupils add or fix stuff they check the code back in to the repository. And they can split or branch code.

      At any time the local working copy of the code can be deleted, all the code and other project files are safe on the version control server. Just check them out from the repo again, when needed.

      You can create assignments and the pupils can fork the assignments to create their own copy, in their own repos to work on. And they can give others access for collaboration. And you can file issues pointing out problems or passing assignments.

      Version control like this is not limited to coding. It could be used for many different types of projects. For instance collaborative writing assignments. Lection planning. Planning a big party. Building something. Research and reports. Art projects with photo/video documentation.
      OMV 4: 9 x Odroid HC2 + 1 x Odroid HC1 + 1 x Raspberry Pi 4
    • The "correct" way to do this is to setup some version control server with a centralized repository.

      It can be on a OMV NAS. Or it can be on GitHub or GitLab or some other cloud version control server. There are plenty of free options. Not necessarily using Git. But Git is a very popular version control system currently. And it is free and it is available for Debian, so you can install it on a OMV NAS.

      And there are many, many tutorials and many free tools for using Git.

      Then, whenever a pupil want to do some coding/debugging they have to check out the code from the version control server repository to a local folder on their client computer.

      As the pupils add or fix stuff they check the code back in to the repository. And they can split or branch code.

      At any time the local working copy of the code can be deleted, all the code and other project files are safe on the version control server. Just check them out from the repo again, when needed.

      This makes it easy to work with client computers that are reset and purged every time they are booted. Whenever a computer is restarted it is as if it was just installed fresh. Everything deleted, unless saved on the network or checked in to a version control repository.

      You can create assignments and the pupils can fork the assignments to create their own copy, in their own repos to work on. And they can give others access for collaboration. And you can file issues pointing out problems or passing assignments.

      Version control like this is not limited to coding. It could be used for many different types of projects. For instance collaborative writing assignments. Lection planning. Planning a big party. Building something. Research and reports. Home work assignments. Art projects with photo/video documentation.
      OMV 4: 9 x Odroid HC2 + 1 x Odroid HC1 + 1 x Raspberry Pi 4

      The post was edited 1 time, last by Adoby ().

    • Adoby wrote:

      The "correct" way to do this is to setup some version control server with a centralized repository.

      It can be on a OMV NAS. Or it can be on GitHub or GitLab or some other cloud version control server. There are plenty of free options. Not necessarily using Git. But Git is a very popular version control system currently. And it is free and it is available for Debian, so you can install it on a OMV NAS.

      And there are many, many tutorials and many free tools for using Git.

      Then, whenever a pupil want to do some coding/debugging they have to check out the code from the version control server repository to a local folder on their client computer.

      As the pupils add or fix stuff they check the code back in to the repository. And they can split or branch code.

      At any time the local working copy of the code can be deleted, all the code and other project files are safe on the version control server. Just check them out from the repo again, when needed.

      This makes it easy to work with client computers that are reset and purged every time they are booted. Whenever a computer is restarted it is as if it was just installed fresh. Everything deleted, unless saved on the network or checked in to a version control repository.

      You can create assignments and the pupils can fork the assignments to create their own copy, in their own repos to work on. And they can give others access for collaboration. And you can file issues pointing out problems or passing assignments.

      Version control like this is not limited to coding. It could be used for many different types of projects. For instance collaborative writing assignments. Lection planning. Planning a big party. Building something. Research and reports. Home work assignments. Art projects with photo/video documentation.
      What you wrote is very interesting. But please I would like to understand things practically. If I create this type of server in omv, how will pupils access their projects?
    • Adoby wrote:

      The "correct" way to do this is to setup some version control server with a centralized repository.

      It can be on a OMV NAS. Or it can be on GitHub or GitLab or some other cloud version control server. There are plenty of free options. Not necessarily using Git. But Git is a very popular version control system currently. And it is free and it is available for Debian, so you can install it on a OMV NAS.

      And there are many, many tutorials and many free tools for using Git.

      Then, whenever a pupil want to do some coding/debugging they have to check out the code from the version control server repository to a local folder on their client computer.

      As the pupils add or fix stuff they check the code back in to the repository. And they can split or branch code.

      At any time the local working copy of the code can be deleted, all the code and other project files are safe on the version control server. Just check them out from the repo again, when needed.

      You can create assignments and the pupils can fork the assignments to create their own copy, in their own repos to work on. And they can give others access for collaboration. And you can file issues pointing out problems or passing assignments.

      Version control like this is not limited to coding. It could be used for many different types of projects. For instance collaborative writing assignments. Lection planning. Planning a big party. Building something. Research and reports. Art projects with photo/video documentation.
      What you wrote is very interesting. But please I would like to understand things practically. If I create this type of server in omv, how will pupils access their projects?
    • Workflow for a pupil:

      Login on client.
      Start a version control server repository browser. Possibly web based.
      Possibly login to the repository server.
      Check out a personal repository to a local folder.
      Loop:
      Edit/compile/test. Check in changes.
      If time left goto Loop
      Make sure changes are checked in.
      Possibly delete local repository.
      Log out.

      With Git you need to run Git on the client and on the server. There is Git client software available for Windows, MacOS and Linux. And I suspect for all other OS you can think up.

      The simplest Git client software is to use the command line. But there are also graphical user interfaces for accessing and browsing and interacting with repositories. And for checking in and out projects. And there even are web based interfaces.

      If your internet access is good you don't even have to setup a version control server. Instead you can show your pupils how to use GitHub. Or GitLab. It is free. Then the pupils can create repositories in the cloud. Check in and out code when and where they want to. In the school or at home. Some editors and IDEs have built-in support for version control, including Git and GitHub. I use NetBeans for C++. And the web interface for everything else.

      I suggest that you try it out yourself. Do a search for "Git tutorial" or "GitHub tutorial" and test stuff.

      I use GitHub for some of my code. Mostly for testing, so far. I'm "WikiBox" on GitHub.

      github.com/WikiBox

      I used to work as a programmer. The company I worked for used SubVersion. Similar workflow.
      OMV 4: 9 x Odroid HC2 + 1 x Odroid HC1 + 1 x Raspberry Pi 4

      The post was edited 1 time, last by Adoby ().

    • Adoby wrote:

      Workflow for a pupil:

      Login on client.
      Start a version control server repository browser. Possibly web based.
      Possibly login to the repository server.
      Check out a personal repository to a local folder.
      Loop:
      Edit/compile/test. Check in changes.
      If time left goto Loop
      Make sure changes are checked in.
      Possibly delete local repository.
      Log out.

      With Git you need to run Git on the client and on the server. There is Git client software available for Windows, MacOS and Linux. And I suspect for all other OS you can think up.

      The simplest Git client software is to use the command line. But there are also graphical user interfaces for accessing and browsing and interacting with repositories. And for checking in and out projects. And there even are web based interfaces.

      If your internet access is good you don't even have to setup a version control server. Instead you can show your pupils how to use GitHub. Or GitLab. It is free. Then the pupils can create repositories in the cloud. Check in and out code when and where they want to. In the school or at home. Some editors and IDEs have built-in support for version control, including Git and GitHub. I use NetBeans for C++. And the web interface for everything else.

      I suggest that you try it out yourself. Do a search for "Git tutorial" or "GitHub tutorial" and test stuff.

      I use GitHub for some of my code. Mostly for testing, so far. I'm "WikiBox" on GitHub.

      github.com/WikiBox

      I used to work as a programmer. The company I worked for used SubVersion. Similar workflow.
      The pupils were taught to use the Microsoft Visual Basic development environment. this concept is already complicated enough for me to understand, let alone for them. what I would like to do is make it take advantage of omv to its full potential. Please explain to me step by step how I can integrate Microsoft's Visual Basic development environment with omv, so that their projects reside on omv.
    • I'll explain you better. Each student works on his own, but everyone must reach the same goal as the project. Each of them produces his own Microsoft Visual Basic project, and usually everyone saves it on their personal USB flash drive. But now I have installed omv and I wanted to make things easier. Instead, I think I have complicated everything. How would you structure the saving of their personal projects? taking into account that it is not possible to debug .. (I want to keep omv safe)
    • I have no idea what ages or levels you are teaching or how hard defined the goals and the curriculum is.

      But first of all I would use Linux, not Windows. Perhaps teaching python? And do it so stuff could run on Windows, Mac and Linux and perhaps even in a web-browser. Perhaps using PySimpleGUI? Or something else similar.

      And I would definitely have the pupils use some form of version control. At least for tasks that take more than one lesson to complete. Perhaps have a whole Linux development environment on personal USB thumb drives, not just the source code. And everything pre-configured to work smoothly against the version control system. And if a thumb drive ever is messed up, just reflash it. Or use SD cards? Or SSDs?

      I'd use the version control system to give out assignments, the pupils fork the assignment to a private repo and complete it there.

      It could be an advanced team project for a couple of weeks work to set everything up and write workflow documentation and so on. Perhaps using a wiki that is part of the setup as well.

      I haven't actually used PySimpleGUI, but it looks like it could be very nice for (learning or teaching?) Python GUI programming.

      pysimplegui.readthedocs.io/en/latest/

      This all has very little, if anything, to do with OMV...
      OMV 4: 9 x Odroid HC2 + 1 x Odroid HC1 + 1 x Raspberry Pi 4
    • The students practice programming only and exclusively through Visual studio, and create Visual Basic projects. Debugging is essential for them. I don't really know git, but I believe that since each of them develops the project on their own, maybe git is not so necessary. Returning to omv, is there a way to create an isolated (virtual?) Environment in omv from the rest of the system where applications can be run?