Openmediavault 3.x - Important Information!

  • Sure i didnt see the notes "dont upgrade from 2.x to 3.x via omv-upgrade"
    So i went from 1.9 to latest 3.x via omv-upgrade.... bad things happen :/


    everything seems to work but the weblogin doesnt. i dont want to reinstall everything.. i spent very much time with the installation cause i am not so good at linux...

    First let me say that I'm hoping that someone in the forum knows an easy way to fix your problem.
    ______________________________________________________


    With that said; I'm not so good at Linux either, and yes, I spent a good bit of time setting up my system as well.


    Knowing that I'm not good at Linux and wanting to preserve my data forced me to think of ways where I could help myself to be more, shall we say, "independent". So here's the first truly relevant question in this circumstance. Do you have a backup of your boot drive? (About 16GB or less and easy to do.)


    If not, since your data and boot drives are separate, all is not lost. (I'm referring to the data in your shares. It's still there.) However, recovery is not as easy as it would have been, if you had backup. Without backup, unfortunately, a rebuild may be in your future.

  • PHP Fatal error: require_once(): Failed opening required 'openmediavault/config.inc' (include_path='.:/usr/share/php:/usr/share/pear') in /usr/share/openmediavault/engined/rpc/backup.inc on line 19


    backup.inc is your issue. remove it and run omv-engined -d -f again.


    (To remove use apt-get purge openmediavault-backup - this did it for me).

    HP N54L Microserver, 20Gb Intel SSD, 4Gb RAM runing OMV 4.X
    HP N54L Microserver 20Gb Intel SSD, 8Gb RAM running OMV 4.X
    and loads of other PC's and NAS... OMV by far the best....
    (P.S. I hate Windows 10, 8.1, 8, 7 Vista, XP, 2K, ME, 98se, 98 and 95 - I have lost hours of my life to this windows virus)

  • Hi guys


    Just a couple of questions,


    is v3 now stable ?


    I have some plugins installed will I need to uninstall any of them before I upgrade to v3


    Here's a list of my plugins


    root@Home-NAS:~# dpkg -l | grep openm
    ii openmediavault 2.2.14 all Open network attached storage solution
    ii openmediavault-keyring 0.4 all GnuPG archive keys of the OpenMediaVault archive
    ii openmediavault-minidlna 1.1 all OpenMediaVault miniDLNA (DLNA server) plugin
    ii openmediavault-omvextrasorg 2.13.9 all OMV-Extras.org Package Repositories for OpenMediaVault
    ii openmediavault-plexmediaserver 1.0.15 all OpenMediaVault Plex Media Server plugin
    ii openmediavault-syncthing 1.9.2 all Syncthing plugin for OpenMediaVault.
    ii openmediavault-transmissionbt 1.4 all OpenMediaVault Transmission (BitTorrent client) plugin.
    root@Home-NAS:~#




    Many thanks




    Graeme

  • it is stable. Unfortunately the upgrade process is not error free even if you run a server with no plugins. Clean install is the best option.

  • Probably would be good to post a bug @ http://bugtracker.openmediavault.org Give as many details as you can.

  • I just changed my Web UI for the same reason, just a few minutes ago. (I couldn't see the comments field.):


    ryecoaaron, one of the moderators, put me onto the info needed to change the Web UI to address the problem you demo'ed.


    The post is here -> Change Web UI


    (This will require that you SSH in and edit config files.)

  • Oh, I forgot to mention, use the "gray" theme.

  • As upgrade from 2.0 to 3.0 is not recommended:


    - when is end of life/ end of support for 2.0?
    - are there any downsides to still running 2.0?


    I have a good number of plugins and specific configuration. It would be painful to do a fresh install and reconfigure everything.

  • As upgrade from 2.0 to 3.0 is not recommended:


    - when is end of life/ end of support for 2.0?
    - are there any downsides to still running 2.0?


    I have a good number of plugins and specific configuration. It would be painful to do a fresh install and reconfigure everything.


    As far as OMV 2.0 is concerned:
    - The "End of Life" is as you see fit. M$ stopped supporting XP a long time ago but it's still in use. In fact, interestingly, XP has more client / market share than Mac OS10 which is still supported. Client OS use - 2017
    - "End of Support" is another matter altogether. On the OMV side of it, this forum will continue to answer tech questions regarding OMV 2.0 but many of those answers will be; "the problem is fixed - upgrade to 3.0".
    Also, I think I can say with a bit of confidence that OMV developers (Volker/OMV, ryecoarron/plugin's, and others) are, for the most part, finished with OMV 2.0. The plugin base is what it is, right now. Nothing new or improved will be developed for OMV 2.0 (In fact, it was a new plugin that made me adopt 3.0 while it was still in beta.)
    What I would be more concerned with, if I was you, would be the security support given the Debian, Wheezy. OMV 2.0 is based on Wheezy and support for Wheezy (LTS) ends on May 2018. After the first part of next year, the security holes and exploits found in Wheezy will only continue to grow.


    The down side of running 2.0? (Beyond what I mentioned above.)
    - While existing articles and [how to's] will remain, the forum will gravitate away from supporting 2.0. Human memory is what it is so support of any kind will begin to dry up. Also, over time, there will be inevitable failures with older hardware. So, from my point of view, it's better to adopt the newer platform where support is still available, BEFORE a disaster strikes.


    There is a small upside to keeping OMV 2.0.
    If you have older 32 bit hardware that you don't want to update and you're not willing to build Debian first and layer OMV on it (to retain 32 bit hardware), let your 2.0 rig run until it fails. If you go this route, I wouldn't change or reconfigure anything and, for the security reasons mentioned above, I'd be sure to wall off the NAS from the Internet.

  • I was mainly heading at the security of course.
    As support for Wheezy ends May 2018 I still have some time left hoping that an easier way of upgrading will surface.


    I am guessing the same issue will affect a lot of other users being in the same situation.
    For myself I will wait a few more months until i will start to think about setting up from scratch with 3.0.

  • Hi flmaxey and monsen,
    @ flmaxey: Thanks for the good explanations
    @ monsen: yes, you are not alone with your thoughts on an easy and reliable way to upgrade without installing it from scratch and do the reconfiguration of all the shares, plugins etc. see: General Advice or FAQ on Upgrade OMV 2.x (Stoneburner) -->3.x (Erasmus)

    OpenMediaVault 5.x (most recent stable version) -- 64 bit -- OMV-Extras 5.x (most recent stable version) -- Default Kernel

  • I still have some time left hoping that an easier way of upgrading will surface.
    I am guessing the same issue will affect a lot of other users being in the same situation.
    For myself I will wait a few more months until i will start to think about setting up from scratch with 3.0.

    I think I can say, with a fair amount of confidence, that the upgrade path won't change.


    While OMV is an awesome NAS product, it has a very small number of developers. Further, while most don't realize it, an "in place upgrade" can require a set of scripts so complicated that they rival the entire development effort required for the finished version upgrade. And the custom coded plugin's, each of which are individually configured for different tasks by different users, have similar considerations.


    You could remove all plugins and try the command line "in place" upgrade but that defeats your purpose. I wouldn't try that route without a tested clone of my boot drive. In fact, before upgrading to 3.0, I would leave my working ver 2.0 boot drive unaltered, and set it off to the side. If you have problems getting your data drive(s) to mount in 3.0, you could back out.

  • Thanks for your thoughts on that flmaxey.
    I don't know what your source for information regarding a not changing upgrade path is. But assuming I can rely on that it is valuable information.
    I absolutely understand that upgrade scripts might be difficult to handle for the developers in this case .
    Still i thought this might come. OMV seems to be used by quite a growing user base. Not having easy upgrade procedures is probably a killer argument for a good number of users. Not for me though (it is a pain in the ass but doable ;) )


    I agree with you that I should either do a ghost copy of the boot drive or even better place it in my locker and test everyhing concerning 3.0 on another drive.


    I will do this when i have some spare time (?? that although might not be in near future :) )

  • I don't know what your source for information regarding a not changing upgrade path is. But assuming I can rely on that it is valuable information.

    This comes from the developers. (Beyond installation scripts which is nothing to take lightly.) As I understand it, there are differences between OMV 2 and 3 that can't be patched / resolved in some upgrades with complete "reliability". I've tried the in-place command line upgrade, more than once, and never had a "clean" outcome.


    I've read where some have managed to do the upgrade by stripping out all plugins, deactivating / deconfiguring services, etc., but there's no way to know how far they stripped OMV down, what their hardware is, etc., etc. At some point upgrading in that way is self defeating. Time is not actually saved. It's much cleaner and, arguably faster, to do a fresh install.


    As an example, here's a user on the forum where the upgrade worked in one instance and failed in another. Presumably, he did the same thing, the same way, in both instances (potentially with the same hardware?), but with much different outcomes. Link


    OMV seems to be used by quite a growing user base. Not having easy upgrade procedures is probably a killer argument for a good number of users. Not for me though (it is a pain in the ass but doable ;) )

    Yes it is (getting popular). I've noticed that it's steadily climbing in the ratings on distrowatch.com


    Further, I'll confess that I'm not happy about the "rough" nature of upgrade path. But OMV does have very limited developer resources and, in addition to development, the dev's spend a great deal of time running this forum. That may mean, unfortunately, that OMV may not be right for absolute NOOB beginners because the support isn't there for the issues they'll have and the questions they'll ask. (It's my intent to write a "Getting Started" guide for NOOB's, to get some traffic off of the forum, but that's going to take some time.)


    On the other hand, OMV is not a desktop client so it stands to reason that support would not be the same. It's set up as all servers should be, with the OS on a dedicated drive and data segregated away on another physical drive. The valuable commodity in a NAS is the "data", not the version of OS.


    I agree with you that I should either do a ghost copy of the boot drive or even better place it in my locker and test everyhing concerning 3.0 on another drive.

    Then you're way ahead of the game. You can experiment to your hearts content, and without fear, if you're NOT tampering with your production setup. It's amazing to me how server redundancy, even data back backup, is completely ignored.


    As a suggestion, why don't you build OMV 3 on a USB thumb drive? They're cheap and if configured correctly, with the flash memory plugin, very reliable. It's just a matter of configuring BIOS (or UEFI) to boot USB first. Since most PC's have USP ports on the front, swapping USB boot drives for testing, or a quick recovery, is easy.


    Here's a recent post detailing the reasons of why I flash drives exclusively. USB Drives

  • Yeah using a USB stick is a good idea. Although I have the luxury of still having a new and empty SSD drive laying around. I will just use that :)

    Rich guys with SSD's laying around... :D


    That sounds good (an SSD) but what I would ask you is, do you have two? I use USB sticks because they're cheap and I can clone them easily. If there's ever a failure (eventually, for some reason, there will be), a clone puts me back in business, without the drama, in a matter of minutes. And yes, over the years, I've had more than one occasion to use one of my clones. A boot failure and an upgrade that went south comes to mind. Being able to simply plug in a tested backup had me up in minutes.

  • To be honest: yes i have 2 :)


    But here is how i prevent destaster: i frequently backup the OS drive to the data partition. If my OS drive breaks i will use my backup drive with the backup image or i just order a new drive. no drama :) and no different to using USB sticks (well just the price maybe).

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