USB Sticks/CF Cards Should not be used as System Drive

  • Still not worth the risk in my eyes. A typical 2.5" laptop hard drive uses less than 1 watt at idle and less than 2.5 watts during a read operation.

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  • If you are concerned about power consumption the hard drive is the last thing to worry about. SSD's are very low in power usage as well. I'll just say it, usb/cf flash sucks. Caveat emptor! I use my OMV for transfers now or cloud drives. The only place I use flash is extra storage on my cell phone and in cameras.

  • Like Tekkbebe I've quit using flash memory except for my cameras, MP3 players, and USB sticks for music in the car. I don't store anything critical on them and as for pictures I want to keep I put them on OMV and another systems hard drive.


    Before and after I update the OMV system drive or change the config I create a copy of it with CloneZilla, and save two copies of it as well. Call it paranoid or whatever but it sure is easier to restore from CloneZilla than try to recreate the config and go through the updates.


    Remember BackUps are your friend!


    Take a look at Western Digital's site and notice they recommend platter drives for the demanding use of NAS and if it is business related they suggest their enterprise drives. Why is that? Think about it.


    Just do NOT use flash media (except SSD) for OMV and anything critical.

  • Quote from "c.monty"

    What would be the disadvantages of running the main system on flash drive, by means of tuning the system for flash drive as documented here http://bernaerts.dyndns.org/li…bian-server-compact-flash, and storing the data on HDD?


    I have yet to see someone completely eliminate the write problem. So, I still would not use a flash drive.

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  • Quote from "c.monty"

    My understanding of this installation approach is, that almost all write operations will go to ramdisk and flash memory won't be touched.


    That may be the case but moving all the writes to ramdisk hasn't worked out so well with OMV. An update/upgrade to OMV may overwrite your changes as well. A laptop hard drive (even with usb converter) is a much better idea.

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  • Having read the link and the process used did not address the use of collectd as discussed in http://forums.openmediavault.org/viewtopic.php?f=12&t=2391 this seems to where a lot of the read/writes originate.


    Stick with SSD/HDD for OMV system drive. And remember Clonezilla is your friend.

  • And this method of writing to a ram disk would be more reliable if there was a power loss or glitch? Setting up a ram disk would be ez for an average linux user and ez to troubleshoot if there were issues. NOT! NOT! NOT! NOT!. OMV is not a hypervisor. It is based on Debian, which is not an hypervisor.


    Nuff Said.

  • I'm still running OMV from a 4 GB USB stick. It's lasted 7 months so far, with pretty much daily use. I have triple backups of everything, so no data is in danger. But since a lot of people have bad experiences with it, I wouldn't recommend it.

  • It's a standard Verbatim micro stick: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Verba…Flash-Drive/dp/B001QFAR3S


    Before I tried OMV, I installed FreeNAS on a free USB stick I got from somewhere. Even though FreeNAS can run fine on a flash medium, I experienced lots of problems. Turns out the free USB stick was defect all along, I just didn't notice until I used it for more than simple file transfers. So even if running OMV from a flash medium has associated risks, I think the vast majority of problems are caused by cheap, old flash drives that are already faulty.


    Disclaimer: Still not encouraging the use of them though :)

  • Well, my raspberry pi already toasted one sd card and one usb stick that was used for the system install. I wouldn't recommend to use debian on a flash drive.


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  • To me it looks like it is a thumbstick made to fit an IDE slot. Looked at their FAQ's - Blank, Awards - Blank - not good.


    Looked at Amazon for IDE drives - and found several for less than $30 USD, might be refurbs. If you search a bit you should be able to find someone with new IDE drives at similar prices.


    A regular HDD would be better in my thinking.

  • Quote from "PhantomSens"

    To me it looks like it is a thumbstick made to fit an IDE slot. Looked at their FAQ's - Blank, Awards - Blank - not good.


    Looked at Amazon for IDE drives - and found several for less than $30 USD, might be refurbs. If you search a bit you should be able to find someone with new IDE drives at similar prices.


    A regular HDD would be better in my thinking.


    Agreed.. I wouldn't expect what you posted to last very long.

  • Hi,
    as the new HP MicroServer Gen8 has a MicroSD-Slot on board, I'm thinking about using a MicroSD as systemdrive After reading this post, I'm quite unsure, whether this is a good idea...
    Doing some research I found some companies, which produce/offer industrial grade flash media. The difference to ordinary consumer devices is described here:


    Quote

    Endurance
    Not commonly known is issue of program/erase cycle lifetimes on NAND flash technology. The storage can only be erased and programmed to a finite number of times. Current SLC (Single Level Cell) technology is rated for at least 20 times more program/erase cycles than current MLC (Multi Level Cell) technology. In heavy erase/program applications, SLC is highly recommended to avoid pre-mature storage failure. Due to the fact that MLC is consumer/volume driven, within the next couple years MLC technology will continue to erode in program/erase cycle ability in order to have a lower cost/density. The new MLC die being used, starting 2010, is downrated from 10,000 cycles to 5,000 cycles. The upcoming 3-Bit MLC technology (a.k.a. TLC) has an exponentially lower number of program/erase cycles. SLC technology, targeting embedded and mission critical applications, will continue to maintain an emphasis on endurance and reliability.


    Here in short:



    A huge drawback is the price (8gb MicroSD @ $120). But it's small and handy..


    What do you think?


    Greetings from germany.
    Helmut

    HW: HP ProLiant MicroServer Gen8 (Xeon E3-1220l v2, 8GB ECC, System: 40GB SSD, Data: 4x4TB WD Red)
    OS: OMV 2.1.18 (Stone burner on Debian Wheezy) with kernel 3.16 (still waiting for support of BTRFS)

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