Transfering files caps out at 112 Mbps on a 1Gbps network.

  • So I seem to have an issue with speeds on file transfers. I'm guessing it a software issue as the hardware seems to be correct and working.


    My home network is setup using an ASUS RT-AC5300 and a Netgear 8-Port Gigabit Switch, all connected by Cat6 Cables. All Computers, including the NAS have Gigabit network cards.


    So my HP 420 Workstation reads that it's running at 1 Gbps, and when downloading or doing speed tests I get around them speeds from my ISP, I tested the NAS and checked it's settings for speed as well and it also gets around the 1 Gbps speeds from my ISP. But When I do file transfers internally I am cap out at 112 Mbps.


    So I know the network, and the NIC's can handle 1 Gbps, and they seem to do so when using them outside of the local network for downloading from the web. But when used to move files within the network, they can't get pass 112 Mbps.


    Any ideas as to how I can get them to be just as fast internally as they are when downloading from the world wide web ?

  • I once had a machine that wouldn't hit full rate as the cable had some internal damage and the system slowed down because of it - only found that out by changing the cable.


    "bps" seems to be very commonly used in networking. Network cards will often be quoted in Gbps/Mbps. In reality all it has done is change the '/' to 'p'.

  • in the past I think people were more attached to clearly describing the speed units

    I don't think so since https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gibibyte (people talk about Gigabyte when they mean Gibibyte and so on).


    Anyway: IMO it's clear what the problem is: GbE maxing out at ~110 MB/s transfer speeds which is quite normal.

  • Mpbs? You're now talking about MB/s, right?

    Ah your right I didn't take notice to the Capital "B" when doing file transfers which means I am getting the correct speeds for a Gigabit NIC.


    and Mr. Grape you would be correct in the terms of for capital and lower case "B" having two meanings. That's how I learned it in college when I did networking. But this is just a case of me not paying attention when doing the file transfer. I figured it was reading the same as task manger using the Mbps (Mb/s) and not the MBps (MB/s).


    So I am indeed getting about 1000 Mbps.


    filetransfer.pngtaskmanager.png

  • No I agree. I was thinking it was reading 112 Mb/s not MB/s lol. I’m use to task manger, my router, and other network apps I use. They all measure in bits when doing speed test and monitoring speeds on the home network to ensure I’m getting close to 1 Gbps inside and out.

  • Mr. Grape you would be correct in the terms of for capital and lower case "B" having two meanings. That's how I learned it in college when I did networking. But this is just a case of me not paying attention when doing the file transfer. I figured it was reading the same as task manger using the Mbps (Mb/s) and not the MBps (MB/s).


    So I am indeed getting about 1000 Mbps.


    filetransfer.png do my homework

    Jeez, I've got confused about Mb/s not MB/s at first too. Days this difference was essential to my networking projects at college are far behind...

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