Flash Memory Plugin

  • Thank you. I will test it, even if it means I need to reinstall OMV afterwards. I need the experience of setting it all up again. I am enjoying this OMV very much. It is indeed a most usefull piece of software, that is able to revive old hardware. I currently run 2 small NAS systems at home. Ons is NetGear ReadyNas, the other is Seagate BlackArmour NAS. They are both limited in that they only hafe 2 bays, and can only thake 4TB drives. I need bigger and more drives, and OMV has allowed me to do this securely.

  • They are both limited in that they only hafe 2 bays, and can only thake 4TB drives

    Hard to believe since there is no 4TB barrier. If 3 TB work, then 3072 TB should also work. But maybe an artificial restriction and not related to OMV anyway.


    Just for the record: testing for rootfs integrity with OMV is 'as easy' as:

    • Creating a normal user account in the OMV UI and adding the account to the groups ssh and sudo
    • Logging in as this user via SSH
    • sudo -s
    • [ -d $HOME ] || (mkdir -m 700 $HOME ; chown ${SUDO_USER}:users $HOME)
    • which f3write || apt install f3
    • exit
    • fallocate -l 32M $HOME/empty.32m
    • f3write $HOME ; rm $HOME/empty.32m
    • f3read $HOME ; rm $HOME/*.h2w

    Testing this way doesn't destroy anything and is also sufficient to spot cards with fake capacity.

  • Hard to believe since there is no 4TB barrier. If 3 TB work, then 3072 TB should also work. But maybe an artificial restriction and not related to OMV anyway.


    I am refering to my NetGear ReadyNAS and SeagateNas systems, both state they do not support drives larger than 4TB. Perhaps larger drives did not exist at the time, I don't know.

  • Most likely there are updated hardware compability lists for both NAS available somewhere online. Specifying models and sizes for HDDs that can be used. Might depend on the age and model of the NAS when/if updates to the hardware compatibility lists has stopped.

    Be smart - be lazy. Clone your rootfs.
    OMV 5: 9 x Odroid HC2 + 1 x Odroid HC1 + 1 x Raspberry Pi 4

  • I am refering to my NetGear ReadyNAS and SeagateNas systems, both state they do not support drives larger than 4TB

    Sure, I understood that they claim there would be a 4TB limit. But there exists no technical reason for this since if more than 2 TiB work, then the next real technical barrier (caused by LBA-48) is +100 petabytes. If a NAS or disk enclosure supports 3 TB then it supports +100 petabytes as well unless it's artificially crippled.

  • That sounds quite logical, I have to agree with you tkaiser. I just assumed that it would have to do with the power usage of larger disks, I thought they might use more. I might even try putting in larger disks to see if it works.

  • I just assumed that it would have to do with the power usage of larger disks

    Nah, see this HDD list filtered for 'up to 8W active consumption': https://geizhals.de/?cat=hde7s&xf=3264_8&sort=-p#productlist -- you find disks with low capacity as well as 12TB and 14TB models.


    If vendors write 'max x TB' somewhere then as @Adoby already explained it's usually the result of liability laws and internal testings at the time of writing. And if they tested with 4 TB max then most likely they'll write 'up to 4TB' in the specs. But there's really no reason to believe into this since the last real barrier we had was at 2TiB (32-bit overflow affecting especially USB/Firewire disk enclosures and older controllers).


    The SATA specs from the early beginnings specified LBA-48 and as such with 512 byte sectors we're talking about +100 petabytes as next technical barrier wrt disk sizes (with 4k sectors it's 8 times more).

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