new debian10/omv5 server install

  • Hello All,


    Hope you are all keeping safe and healthy in these trying times.

    I work for a mid-size internet/cloud service provider, and am now working from home - aka lots of extra time on my hands for projects.

    I used to administer windows servers in the early 2000s, but have done zero system admin since then. I have very little linux xp, but have some xp with cmd line, mostly cisco IOS.


    My simple htpc/media/storage solution is full, and I have decided to build my own nas/web/backup/file server instead of buying a limited synology/qnap device.

    I've done quite a bit of reading, and have decided to use OMV5 on a deb10 server install w/ZFS media volumes.


    I've purchased the following hardware, and have it assembled and ready for OS/sw installs:

    Dell PE T430 8-bay (dual 12-core procs, 96gb ram)

    2 - 180gb intel SSDs for OS/apps - probably not raid-mirrored, most likely daily incremental mirror to limit writes

    4 - 3Tb SAS drives - which I will initially use for all media/web storage, but eventually only use for crucial family media/web (planned raidZ2)

    plan for additional 4 - 6Tb drives in raidZ1 for long-term media storage - will move non-family media from raidZ2 above


    So that's where i'm at. I started installing debian, and was immediately hit by ?s regarding partition sizes on the 180gb SSD. debain wanted to create a 26gb root, 30gb usr, and 103gb swap partition.

    That just doesn't strike me as an efficient use of space - but i am a noob...


    Just figured I'd throw these ?s up here while i continue to watch/read TechnoDad and some other great contributors and try and educate myself.

    If anyone has the time and wants to weigh-in on their experiences/recommendations - primarily from a storage/partition layout perspective.


    Best to all,


    John in Wyoming, MI

  • Personally... I have a swap partition, and a / partition on the OS drive, and that's it (not just on my server, but also on my laptops and desktops). I don't find separating /usr, and /boot, etc. useful, and just don't bother. If you intend to use your OS disk for services, you'll want to partition it so you can mount some of the free space for storage to use in the webUI (by default, the OS disk won't be available in the webUI)


    I don't use large OS disks like 180gig, so my OS disks are just that, for the OS.

  • For OMV a swap and / will suffice but on my desktop and notebook I useally set it up with /, /home and swap to make it easier to reinstall my Debian testing/bulleye if needed.


    Going to install OMV buster on my QNAP TS-459 Pro and will use just a 16GB USB drive. Import the RAID5 setup and update/upgrade the system to Debian bullseye as then I can install anacrolix-dms which is a excellent media server for me. No hassle with transcoding or whatever.

    TS-459 Pro with OMV5 and upgraded to Debian bullseye.

    Treading uncharted grounds.

    1995 Slackware, 1995-2002 OS/2, 1996-2000 SuSE, 1999-2013 AIX Solaris Tru64, 2007-2011 Ubuntu, 2011-? Debian testing.

    Edited once, last by DeeDee Ranged: Typo ().

  • update/upgrade the system to Debian bullseye as then I can install anacrolix-dms which is a excellent media server for me.

    If you are going to leave OMV installed, don't upgrade to bullseye.

    omv 5.5.1 usul | 64 bit | 5.4 proxmox kernel | omvextrasorg 5.3.3
    omv-extras.org plugins source code and issue tracker - github


    Please read this before posting a question.
    Please don't PM for support... Too many PMs!

  • So I struggled with my first Debian 10 install. I ended up doing a few practice installs. I went with a single partition and 8Gb swap. I had lots of failure messages first time around. Took me awhile to figure out how to edit source file to remove the CDROM entry - my first time using vi - not very user friendly. I had also installed Debian with the web/apache option - seems that may have been conflicting with OMV. I reinstalled without www and things went better. Used the install scripts to get OMV and extras installed.

    I changed web mgmt port to 8000 as I would like to run a very basic web server on port 80 - still researching. Ran into problems when I tried to run ALL the update pkgs at once. I needed to install one particular update first that was a pre-req for another update. Things went better after that. Installed proxmox and set it's kernel to be default. Installed ZFS, which I plan on using to setup raidZ1 and raidZ2 volumes for my data on the 8 hot-swap drives.

    I struggled to find info on how OMV uses disk space. So if OMV is installed on my primary SSD, on debian, will I not be able to install any other apps to that drive? KM0201 stated above that i won't be able to use any of the remaining space on this SSD for any OMV apps? that really stinks - seems there should be a workaround for that. I got a great price on the 180Gb intel SSDs - $45 ea - otherwise I would have just gotten 32 or 64Gb units.


    I tried finding opinions on system backup apps for OMV, at least more info for the ones listed in OMVExtras. I had planned on cloning the system drive daily/every-other-day to another SSD. I didn't find any real recommendations for one backup app over the others - but it appears they each have specific features. Guess I'll install each of them and see which works the best for my use-case.


    Thanks to all for the replies.


    JR

  • after re-reading comments above, I think I understand what's being said about the OMV storage issue. I should have created another partition on the primary drive, maybe labeled "apps" and made that 120Gb or so. Then that partition would be visible/available for any docker/container/apps I need to install in OMV - like Emby. Does anyone have an idea what else I would ever need space for in the primary partition? debian and OMV are there. Nothing else will ever be installed there? Is 30Gb as large as I'll ever need that partition?


    Damn, guess i'll go wipe it and try again...


    Thanks again for the input!

    JR

  • Does anyone have an idea what else I would ever need space for in the primary partition? debian and OMV are there. Nothing else will ever be installed there? Is 30Gb as large as I'll ever need that partition?

    I started with OMV 2.x five years ago on a 16GB SSD. That was upgraded to OMV 3.x, 4.x, and 5.x. Plenty of additional linux programs were installed along the way into the rootfs which is now at 7.4GB with 6.2GB free. There is no swap and no need for swap. I have 16GB of RAM. The machine has never crashed.


    From my experience 30GB is about twice as large as you would ever need, assuming you don't do silly things like have a Plex or Emby database, a bunch of dockers, a bunch of VMs, or have a large kernel collection stored on the rootfs.

    --
    Google is your friend and Bob's your uncle!


    OMV AMD64 5.x on ASRock Rack C2550D4I C0 Stepping - 16GB ECC - Silverstone DS380 + Silverstone DS380 DAS Box.

  • If you are going to leave OMV installed, don't upgrade to bullseye.

    Too late. :) Did full-upgrade to Debian bullseye and managed to get everything working for me including anacrolix-dms mediaserver, only available on bullseye/sid, which is a much faster mediaserver than minidlna or plex mediaserver. Even managed to do a global systemd service for it.

    Sofar it runs fine, now getting a dns/dhcp server up and running, any suggestions, and the display on the TS-459 Pro working and ledmon and I will be a happy camper. ^^

    Doing uncharted grounds with Debian bullseye and OMV5.

    TS-459 Pro with OMV5 and upgraded to Debian bullseye.

    Treading uncharted grounds.

    1995 Slackware, 1995-2002 OS/2, 1996-2000 SuSE, 1999-2013 AIX Solaris Tru64, 2007-2011 Ubuntu, 2011-? Debian testing.

  • Too late.

    Revert to backup.

    including anacrolix-dms mediaserver,

    I would run it in a docker. Then no need for bullseye/sid.

    ow getting a dns/dhcp server up and running, any suggestions,

    dnsmasq or pihole in a docker container.


    Doing uncharted grounds with Debian bullseye and OMV5.

    Uncharted but a bad idea. OMV does not work with php 7.4. So, you are still using your php 7.3 packages from buster BUT since you don't have the buster repos enabled anymore, you will not get updates. I really see no reason for this upgrade.

    omv 5.5.1 usul | 64 bit | 5.4 proxmox kernel | omvextrasorg 5.3.3
    omv-extras.org plugins source code and issue tracker - github


    Please read this before posting a question.
    Please don't PM for support... Too many PMs!

  • Revert to backup.

    I would run it in a docker. Then no need for bullseye/sid.

    dnsmasq or pihole in a docker container.


    Uncharted but a bad idea. OMV does not work with php 7.4. So, you are still using your php 7.3 packages from buster BUT since you don't have the buster repos enabled anymore, you will not get updates. I really see no reason for this upgrade.

    Actually Debian bullseye has php 7.3 and 7.4 in the repo, so anything that still needs php 7.3 will stay on that, I did check. I did leave anything related to the OMV5 pointing to buster. I know I will get some hiccups, but I have time on my hands to experiment. :D


    I suppose could make local OMV5 repo's to see what works with Debian bullseye and what not without docker or portainer.

    TS-459 Pro with OMV5 and upgraded to Debian bullseye.

    Treading uncharted grounds.

    1995 Slackware, 1995-2002 OS/2, 1996-2000 SuSE, 1999-2013 AIX Solaris Tru64, 2007-2011 Ubuntu, 2011-? Debian testing.

    Edited once, last by DeeDee Ranged ().

  • Actually Debian bullseye has php 7.3 and 7.4 in the repo, so anything that still needs php 7.3 will stay on that, I did check. I did leave anything related to the OMV5 pointing to buster. I know I will get some hiccups, but I have time on my hands to experiment.

    But 7.3 most likely won't stay in the repo. And as far as leaving things pointed to buster, you will fight with OMV changing your config back to the release the system actually is (the code doesn't have buster hard coded).

    I suppose could make local OMV5 repo's to see what works with Debian bullseye and what not without docker or portainer.

    I really don't understand this aversion to using buster (or docker). Things in buster are not old. A NAS does not need to be a bleeding edge dev machine (you should know that using slowaris and aix). You are just going fight things as bullseye/sid keep advancing.

    omv 5.5.1 usul | 64 bit | 5.4 proxmox kernel | omvextrasorg 5.3.3
    omv-extras.org plugins source code and issue tracker - github


    Please read this before posting a question.
    Please don't PM for support... Too many PMs!

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