Nextcloud database on system SSD

  • My install suppose a use of SSD for Nextcloud web-server with apps, user's accounts, services and database. Users data is located on ZFS raid.

    SSD paths:

    /docker/nextcloud/db:/var/lib/mysql

    /docker/nextcloud/nc:/var/www/html

    HDD paths:

    /mnt/raid/nc:/var/www/html/data - this is user's default folder in Nextcloud.

    /mnt/pool/photo:/mnt/pool/photo:ro - this is folder for "external storage". I mounted it with the same folders paths to avoid mistakes.

    I have now enough fast reaction from Nextcloud in this configuration rather than in my previous setup with all Nextcloud & DB folders located on HDDs.

  • I'm right now deciding if keep the nextcloud data on SSD or move it to HDD since HDD is a 4TB while SDD is only 128GB. Do you notice any performance issue having the data on the HDD?

  • I'm right now deciding if keep the nextcloud data on SSD or move it to HDD since HDD is a 4TB while SDD is only 128GB. Do you notice any performance issue having the data on the HDD?

    To me, the size of the drive isn't the chief concern (at least as far as OMV is concerned)...


    IMO, part of the beauty of docker, is you can insulate your services from the OS. In the event your OS drive fails.. just reinstall, reinstall docker and point it at your "old" containers directory... and presuming nothing else has changed (data paths, etc.).. you'll be back up in 5min

    Air Conditioners are a lot like PC's... They work great until you open Windows.


  • To me, the size of the drive isn't the chief concern (at least as far as OMV is concerned)...


    IMO, part of the beauty of docker, is you can insulate your services from the OS. In the event your OS drive fails.. just reinstall, reinstall docker and point it at your "old" containers directory... and presuming nothing else has changed (data paths, etc.).. you'll be back up in 5min

    My doubt is about performance issues. Using a ssd vs hdd for Nextcloud data.

  • My doubt is about performance issues. Using a ssd vs hdd for Nextcloud data.

    Understandable... I can only speak from personal experience... I don't load huge files (tops 5-10mb.. pictures, documents, that sort of thing)... My Nextcloud database is stored on a 4tb WD Green.


    The initial setup and the first login was a bit slow (I think that was mostly due to Nextcloud's app store being extremely slow.. there's multiple complaints on this if you Google it) Once I created a few users, got my folders set up, etc.. It honestly it as fast as I could expect my 10yr old Celeron CPU to run a cloud server.


    I have zero complaints with it.

    Air Conditioners are a lot like PC's... They work great until you open Windows.


  • Understandable... I can only speak from personal experience... I don't load huge files (tops 5-10mb.. pictures, documents, that sort of thing)... My Nextcloud database is stored on a 4tb WD Green.


    The initial setup and the first login was a bit slow (I think that was mostly due to Nextcloud's app store being extremely slow.. there's multiple complaints on this if you Google it) Once I created a few users, got my folders set up, etc.. It honestly it as fast as I could expect my 10yr old Celeron CPU to run a cloud server.


    I have zero complaints with it.

    My nexcloud container, db and data are all on the SSD and I'm happy with the performance. I'm thinking on move only data to HDD but I'm afraid that after move it I'll notice any degradation on performance. Both SSD and HDD are connected to RPi4.

  • My nexcloud container, db and data are all on the SSD and I'm happy with the performance. I'm thinking on move only data to HDD but I'm afraid that after move it I'll notice any degradation on performance. Both SSD and HDD are connected to RPi4.

    Ah, I don't use toy computers for this.. so not sure.. :)


    Easy way to test... create a new data folder on your hard drive


    In your stack/docker-compose file, change your nextcloud data drive to the new location (don't touch the old folder).


    Redeploy the stack/docker-compose... and test it. If it is seriously slow or otherwise does not perform to your expectations.... then change the stack/docker-compose file back to the old location and redploy. Once it's done, delete the "test" directory.


    If it works... move your "old" Nextcloud data folder to the HDD from the SSD, adjust your stack/docker-compose file and redeploy. Once it's back up, delete the old "test" directory.


    Other than the actual testing, this shouldn't take more than a couple minutes.

    Air Conditioners are a lot like PC's... They work great until you open Windows.


    Edited once, last by KM0201 ().

  • Have you done this before?

    I would have concerns that the database will be messed.

    No.. but that is a legit concern.


    Well another way to test.. is just build build another nextcloud container entirely. Since he just wants to test drive speed .. just name the containers differently.. for this test it really only needs to be local only.

    Air Conditioners are a lot like PC's... They work great until you open Windows.


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