Review my NAS configuration (Ryzen, ECC)

  • Hello all,


    At this time I have an old mint based RAID 1 server(2 x 4 TB and for the raid one 2 TB non raid). The Hardware is old and it is showing signs it might break down any time now. Before it breaks down I would like to build a new system. For the old system I did configure all the software, did install samba, nfs, wake on LAN, SSH with a key and more. The point is this did take much too much time and effort. I did have a look at FreeNAS and it does look promising, but when reading more about free NAS solutions I read a remark that FreeNAS is open BSD based and OMV is based on Debian, so basically OMV looks more like Mint linux which I use now.


    Usercase

    This is a kind of chicken and egg situation as I did not use a Free NAS OS before, so maybe I want to do more with the system than described in this usercase.


    Sofware

    1. File share with SAMBA and or NFS
    2. Zone Minder (a surveillance software system)
    3. I want to run virtual machines like WIN10, Mint and more so I can log in to it with another machine on the network and use this OS
    4. SSH
    5. Wake on LAN
    6. It must be silent as possible so maybe it is possible to do Zone Minder can store data on a SSD and after a while turn on the RAID 1 HD's and copy the contect from the SSD to the RAID HDD's and turn off the HDD's again. I do not know if it is possible maybe someone can tell me.
    7. Backup data to the cloud
    8. Want to be able to log in to the OMV with a web browser or virtual desktop
    9. maybe more as it is a chicken and egg situation for me

    Hardware


    1. Motherboard: ASRock X470 Master SLI reasoning: M2 Pcie3.0x4, 6x SATA-600, network Intel I211AT, ECC support, no active fan (?). Price 150 Eu
    2. 256 gig Samsung EVO plus reasoning: already have got this one, it is fast etc.
    3. AMD Ryzen 3 3100 reasoning: 16MB level 3 cache, DDR4-3200, faster compared to the old i3 and the new i3's do not support ECC. Price: Eu 110
    4. 2 x Kingston KSM32ES8/8HD (= 2 x 60Eu) or 2 x Kingston KSM32RS8/8MEI (= 2 x 50 Eu) reasoning: it is 2 x 8 gig ECC do not know which option is the best choice.
    5. An old used pasive videocard EN9400GT to be honest I do not know if I can use it because it is a PCI-e 2.0 x16 reasoning: Old but I will only use it to install the OS then I hope I will never use a monitor again for this server. I even saw some low cost usb videocards but I do not want to spend too much time on this subject.
    6. A Big CPU cooler so it will not make too much noise, (I hate noise) Price: about 60 Eu
    7. A old Lian Li computer case,it has got 4 x 3.5 "bays and 4 big ones reasoning: enough room for the 3 HDD's, it is functional
    8. A old Be quit S8-400W PSU reasoning: I already have got it


    Remarks

    I also did take a look at some Motherboards with a CPU on it, but they did not support all the functions like ECC still I find them tempting because of the low price point.

    As I started with the FreeNAS idea I did read ECC is a better option compared to non ECC so I kind of is stuck in my head.


    Questions


    1. Does anyone has got some experience with a ASRock X470 Master SLI Motherboard?
    2. If I build it I would like to test the system without the HDD's in it to see if it is stable enough what is the best way to do this?
    3. What do you think of the above setup? For me this is a lot of cash so I think I better ask before buy.
    4. Are Ryzen CPU's stable? I did read some horror stories about unstable Ryzen systems but that was when the Ryzen was relative new to the marktet.


    I hope some of you can help me with the above

  • The_Others

    Changed the title of the thread from “Review my NAS configuration” to “Review my NAS configuration (Ryzen, ECC)”.
  • Regarding software...


    Nothing here really stands out as incredibly difficult, as long as you're willing to put the work in to learn it. Zoneminder has several popular docker containers. Cloud backup, not sure if you mean you would be hosting it on the server, or paying for hosting... either should be doable. I don't really use RAID, so can't answer your questions there.


    Speaking strictly about your hardware...


    1. Looking at the specs of the board, I don't see any glaring problem (although I only see one with a CPU socket, not an onboard CPU). It has an Intel NIC (which is unusual for AMD boards). To me, this is a requirement for any board I'm going to use, so that's good, even if it is strictly opinion. The old video card you have, shouldn't be necessary. It has an Onboard Radeon video chipset... just hook up the onboard HDMI to a display (I use my TV for OS install, assuming you have internet near the TV), set up an SSH client on a local machine, and unplug the HDMI when you shutdown to install your data drives



    2. Not sure what you mean here. You can install OMV with just one drive (the OS drive). While the OS is more or less useless w/o storage drives, it is recommended you install w/o them attached, run updates, etc. then install your data drives. I wouldn't start installing things until you have your storage drives installed and set up, but for an initial boot/test, there's no issue here.


    3. Again, nothing really stands out to me as something incredibly out of the ordinary.


    4. No experience with them.

    Air Conditioners are a lot like PC's... They work great until you open Windows.




  • 1)There are less expensive boards which do not have a Intel network Chip, but I did read a lot about troubles with other brands network chips. I do not want extra trouble so I am willing to pay some extra.

    About the video out. It will only work with some AMD CPU's with a GPU integrated, for example the 2400G where the letter G tells there is a GPU in this part. There is a downside however. CPU's from AMD with a integrated GPU do *not* support ECC (I think the PRO version does but I am not sure).


    2)Which test can I perform in OMV for example how do I test if ECC functions correctly? How can I test the stability?

  • I did have a look at FreeNAS and it does look promising, but when reading more about free NAS solutions I read a remark that FreeNAS is open BSD based and OMV is based on Debian

    This is not a big issue with FreeNAS, the issue is memory. Before deciding on OMV (+snapRaid) I installed FreeNAS. It looked nice :)) Then I checked memory usage. It was at 2.5GB and slowly creeping up. Without any data drives attached! Some python processes, lots of them. And in docs they say 1GB RAM per one data drive, so I uninstalled it. OMV does not use any RAM it looks like :))

    NASA : It is not as bad as it looks, it is much worse.

  • I've been using FreeNAS for a while. FreeNas community can be kind mean when it comes to your hardware. They expect people to spend some extra dollars to make something server class. Anyway I'm really new to Openmediavault. But switch over seams like the way to go. Somethings are not as easy to do as FreeNAS Jails. But there are somethings that are way better. After playing around with this for the past week. I have figured out that you don't need nearly as much memory as a FreeNas box to do all the same stuff. Also Im learning that dockers are much better than jails with the OS being on Debian. you have a a lot more options to install. I did learn a little bit though Cause I like using ZFS and Raid pools (that's just me not sure about others here) You should install the Proxmox Kernal before adding the ZFS plug in. I noticed I saw errors at the end of the script during my first few times loading and reloaded. But if I used the Proxmox Kernal before loading that plug in I didn't see those. But so far my hold hardware with a i5 and 16GB ram with 3 driver for ZFS is running good only took me 45 minutes to setup after redoing it several times learning stuff. I don't know what that snap raid is though I was not sure about that one. I was more interested in ZFS personally.

  • Yeah Cockpit to me looks more Like VM's which is great cause I hate FreeNAS's Beehive Hypervisor. It lacks a lot of support. KVM on linux distros like OpenMediaVault uses is much better.

  • Hello all,



    I can confirm the hardware works fine, at least as far I can judge with my knowledge. I did had to change some hardware options because the hardware store had some delivery problems.



    current hardware under test:


    • Motherboard: ASRock X470 Master SLI (uses Intel LAN chip )
    • SSD: 256 gig Samsung EVO plus (used for OS)
    • AMD Ryzen 5 2600
    • 2 x Micron MTA9ASF2G72AZ-3G2B1 (2 x 16 gig ECC DDR4 3200)
    • Old 240GT video card (CGNX-HG2424I)
    • Ninja 5 CPU cooler


    I hope this helps other people interested in a Ryzen build.

    I have installed OMV on the M2 ssd and did put a test sata ssd in and I can transfer files etc. Can some one tell me how to perform some other hardware tests before I do mount the HDD's in the case?

  • I've been using FreeNAS for a while. FreeNas community can be kind mean when it comes to your hardware. They expect people to spend some extra dollars to make something server class. Anyway I'm really new to Openmediavault. But switch over seams like the way to go. Somethings are not as easy to do as FreeNAS Jails. But there are somethings that are way better. After playing around with this for the past week. I have figured out that you don't need nearly as much memory as a FreeNas box to do all the same stuff. Also Im learning that dockers are much better than jails with the OS being on Debian. you have a a lot more options to install. I did learn a little bit though Cause I like using ZFS and Raid pools (that's just me not sure about others here) You should install the Proxmox Kernal before adding the ZFS plug in. I noticed I saw errors at the end of the script during my first few times loading and reloaded. But if I used the Proxmox Kernal before loading that plug in I didn't see those. But so far my hold hardware with a i5 and 16GB ram with 3 driver for ZFS is running good only took me 45 minutes to setup after redoing it several times learning stuff. I don't know what that snap raid is though I was not sure about that one. I was more interested in ZFS personally.

    Hey Bizquick,



    Why do you prefer ZFS? I have 2 hd's with the old server I did use RAID1. I wonder if it is wise to go to ZFS.

  • Storage is the most relevant aspect of a NAS but its not mentioned in your HW list at all

    Mobo is for gaming and has unnecessary gimmicks like SLI & 'built-in RGB illumination' => price for NAS use way too high

    omv 5.6.3-1 (usul) on RPi4/4GB with Kernel 5.10.x and WittyPi 3 V2 RTC HAT

    2x 6TB HDD formatted with ext4 in Icy Box IB-RD3662-C31 / hardware supported RAID1

    For Read/Write performance of SMB shares hosted on this hardware see forum here

    Edited once, last by mi-hol ().

  • Storage is the most relevant aspect of a NAS but its not mentioned in your HW list at all

    Mobo is for gaming and has unnecessary gimmicks like SLI & 'built-in RGB illumination' => price for NAS use way too high


    About the Motherboard

    It has got an Intel network chip

    it supports ECC

    Yes there are better ones but the costs are much higher Asrock sells a server board for Ryzen CPU's but it costs 100Eu more compared to this one.


    I use 2 x a 4 TB WD red drives I did mention this in the start of the thread. I did not mention it in the end because I had no doubt the HD's would not work with OMV but I did had some doubts though the mainboard would work with OMV.


    I also will not only use this machine as a NAS but also run VM's like WIN10 etc. And I want to try to run docker things.

  • don't understand the requirement ECC (which is the limiting factor) because you are building a single user machine with a small RAM size.

    ECC comes into play with terabytes of RAM

    omv 5.6.3-1 (usul) on RPi4/4GB with Kernel 5.10.x and WittyPi 3 V2 RTC HAT

    2x 6TB HDD formatted with ext4 in Icy Box IB-RD3662-C31 / hardware supported RAID1

    For Read/Write performance of SMB shares hosted on this hardware see forum here

  • don't understand the requirement ECC (which is the limiting factor) because you are building a single user machine with a small RAM size.

    ECC comes into play with terabytes of RAM

    ECC is not a cure all just like RAID isn't a backup but, ECC is a pinch of prevention just like RAID.


    If you're not storing irreplaceable files, ECC is near useless for home NAS users. I'm a active photographer so ECC is taken for granted and I use all the paranoid ECC options.


    NOTE: These Ryzen CPU's don't really _SUPPORT_ ECC, they tolerate ECC's single surface capability. So if you want mirroring, scrubbing, etc. they won't do. I really don't know the innards of Ryzen ECC functionality so I don't know if it is CPU or motherboard limitations, but of the 20 or so motherboards I looked at, none of them had configurable ECC options.

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