New to OMV, please comment on ARM or x86

  • An ARM device will be meeting the requirements. See for benchmark results linked in my signature

    omv 5.6.21-1 (usul) on RPi4/4GB with Kernel 5.10.63 and WittyPi 3 V2 RTC HAT

    2x 6TB HDD formatted with ext4 in Icy Box IB-RD3662-C31 / hardware supported RAID1

    For Read/Write performance of SMB shares hosted on this hardware see forum here

  • If you want a 64 bit arm board with true sata, get the NanoPi M4 with a sata hat. I have a post somewhere on the forum of the setup I used for my main rig. It is now my #2 machine dedicated to backing up my x-86 server.


    EDIT: I found the post and linked it to my signature. If a case is not important I think you will really like it.

    Easy data backup: In a Scheduled Job: rsync -av --delete /srv/dev-disk-by-label-SOURCE/ /srv/dev-disk-by-label-DESTINATION/ (HT: Getting Started with OMV5)
    OMV 5 (current) - Thinkserver TS140, Nextcloud, Plex, Airsonic, Navidrome, Ubooquity, Digikam, Wetty, & Heimdall - NanoPi M4 (v.1): backups using Rsync and Rsnapshot - Odroid XU4 (Using DietPi): PiHole - hc2, xu4, Pi 3B+, Odroid H2, and VirtualBox: Testing and playing - Mac user converting to Linux, Debian 10 KDE.

    Edited once, last by Agricola ().

  • Naruto, there are several possibilities for getting SATA interfaces.

    My personal preference is a Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 with an expansion board that exposes SATA interface or for even more flexibility the PCIe bus via PCIe or M.2 connector, so adapter cards can be used to provide currently up to 5 SATA interfaces.

    A good list of such expansion boardscan be found on Jeff Geerling's Raspberry Pi PCI Express device compatibility database

    omv 5.6.21-1 (usul) on RPi4/4GB with Kernel 5.10.63 and WittyPi 3 V2 RTC HAT

    2x 6TB HDD formatted with ext4 in Icy Box IB-RD3662-C31 / hardware supported RAID1

    For Read/Write performance of SMB shares hosted on this hardware see forum here

    Edited 2 times, last by mi-hol ().

  • I forgot about this one. I have no experience with the Odroid HC4 but I have read a lot of good about it. Two SATA CONNECTIONS.

    Easy data backup: In a Scheduled Job: rsync -av --delete /srv/dev-disk-by-label-SOURCE/ /srv/dev-disk-by-label-DESTINATION/ (HT: Getting Started with OMV5)
    OMV 5 (current) - Thinkserver TS140, Nextcloud, Plex, Airsonic, Navidrome, Ubooquity, Digikam, Wetty, & Heimdall - NanoPi M4 (v.1): backups using Rsync and Rsnapshot - Odroid XU4 (Using DietPi): PiHole - hc2, xu4, Pi 3B+, Odroid H2, and VirtualBox: Testing and playing - Mac user converting to Linux, Debian 10 KDE.

  • I've seen many people complain about SMB performance with ARM boards.

    SMB is quite heavy and can stress some weak ARM CPUs.

    So if you're going to heavily use SMB, maybe you should consider a good CPU.

    OMV BUILD - MY NAS KILLER - OMV 5.x + omvextrasorg


    Core i3-8300 - ASRock H370M-ITX/ac - 8GB RAM - Sandisk Ultra Flair 32GB (OMV), 256GB NVME SSD (Docker), 3x4TB HDD (Data) - Fractal Design Node 304 - Be quiet! Pure Power 11 350W

  • There's, obviously, nothing wrong with X86. In fact, when all the items to put together a SBC setup are totaled up, an old PC (free) or something from the used market may cost less.
    Some primary features are:

    SBC:

    - Limited boot media options. Many boot exclusively from SD-cards. (SD-cards are not ideal for boot media, but issues can be negated with backup.)

    - Best used with one drive "IF" USB is on the only connection. More than one drive can be used with USB connections in non-RAID scenarios, where equal bandwidth is not required.
    - More limited selection of Dockers. (arm, armhl, arm64, etc.)
    - Fixed ram, no upgrades are possible.
    - No X86 virtualization.

    - (Typically) SBC's have low power consumption. Since power consumption is a reoccurring cost which adds up over time, this factor should be considered.


    AMD64 (X86):

    - Almost any X86 hardware made in the last 10 years can be repurposed to be an OMV server (to include laptops). Repurposing an old workstation is, potentially, a free possibility. - 2 to 4 (or more) SATA ports are typical on most motherboards. Additional drive ports are relatively easy to add with commonly available HBA's.

    - Drive bandwidth contention is not an issue so the various forms of RAID work well. (Laptops are another matter, with USB connections and 1 SATA port.)
    - Widest selection of Dockers.
    - Ram is expandable (if needed).
    - X86 virtualization is possible.
    - NIC's (10GB) and other expansion boards / options are available.

    - Cases are available that can accommodate several drives.
    - Higher power consumption; when the typical X86 system is compared to the typical SBC.

    In the bottom line, for most home users, a good performing SBC will do the job as a basic file server. If rapid expansion of storage or numerous server add-on's are anticipated, X86 might be a better fit.

    Here's a link to the New User guide. The beginning sections may help in the decision process.

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