Proxmox Kernel in OMV 5

  • Hello Guys,


    I have been playing around with the Docker and Portainer in OMV 5.6.xx. I also understand that the Docker and Portainer builds are the CE version. I actually have an 8 tb NAS built on a Raspberry Pi 4 with OMV 5.x.xx, However I am puzzled by this in the OMV Extras:


    What does the above actually do? My assumption is it installs Proxmox or just makes the Libraries available in the current kernel? Am I even close? This puzzles me because I have an OMV built on a Proxmox v7 VM and this would allow for nested virtualization would it not?


    Michael

    http://www.rpihobby.us

    Linux Certified

  • macom

    Approved the thread.
  • What does the above actually do?

    You shouldn't see the Kernel tab at all on an RPi.


    This puzzles me because I have an OMV built on a Proxmox v7 VM and this would allow for nested virtualization would it not?

    My server runs my omv 5.x dev VM which I do plenty of testing the KVM on. So, yes, nested virtualization works fine.


    My assumption is it installs Proxmox or just makes the Libraries available in the current kernel?

    The omv-extras feature only installs the proxmox kernel. You can't install proxmox and omv on the same system. That is why I wrote the kvm plugin. It is simpler than proxmox, but still uses kvm just like proxmox (although no lxc).

    omv 5.6.13 usul | 64 bit | 5.11 proxmox kernel | omvextrasorg 5.6.2 | kvm plugin 5.1.6
    omv-extras.org plugins source code and issue tracker - github


    Please read this before posting a question.
    Please don't PM for support... Too many PMs!

  • You shouldn't see the Kernel tab at all on an RPi.


    My server runs my omv 5.x dev VM which I do plenty of testing the KVM on. So, yes, nested virtualization works fine.


    The omv-extras feature only installs the proxmox kernel. You can't install proxmox and omv on the same system. That is why I wrote the kvm plugin. It is simpler than proxmox, but still uses kvm just like proxmox (although no lxc).


    So yes on the RPi no Kernel Tab that's a good thing because then I would be very confused. The proxmox kernel thing still has me puzzled but I will do some more research.


    Thanks for the response and your time,

    Michael

    Linux Certified

    http://www.rpihobby.us

  • The proxmox kernel thing still has me puzzled but I will do some more research.

    What questions do you have? I originally added it because it was a newer kernel than the Debian kernel. Since proxmox is basically the Ubuntu kernel with Debian userland, I knew adding it to OMV (which is Debian too) would be very good. I'm a big Ubuntu fan and the Ubuntu kernel gets you a newer, more stable kernel than the Debian backports kernel in my opinion.

    omv 5.6.13 usul | 64 bit | 5.11 proxmox kernel | omvextrasorg 5.6.2 | kvm plugin 5.1.6
    omv-extras.org plugins source code and issue tracker - github


    Please read this before posting a question.
    Please don't PM for support... Too many PMs!

  • What questions do you have? I originally added it because it was a newer kernel than the Debian kernel. Since proxmox is basically the Ubuntu kernel with Debian userland, I knew adding it to OMV (which is Debian too) would be very good. I'm a big Ubuntu fan and the Ubuntu kernel gets you a newer, more stable kernel than the Debian backports kernel in my opinion.

    That pretty much answers what I was thinking. Thank you for that.

  • Sorry for hijacking this thread but my question seems to line-up nicely here...


    I (Dell T110 with Xeon X3440 16GB, 6 TB ZFS Pool) immediately switched to Proxmox kernel after a bare-metal installation of OMV 5 on the server. Honestly, I just did that because I followed a tutorial that mentioned the Proxmox kernel would work better for the ZFS I wanted to set up. Indeed, the ZFS runs smoothly.


    I am wondering though if it is still necessary to opt for Proxmox kernel. If I had to choose between "latest and newest and highest performance" vs "stable and not bothering me and allowing me to easily follow tutorials the standard way", I would definitely opt for the second. I sometimes run into issues like, when trying to set up a VM with KVM or optimizing power consumption with cpupower and the error messages point into the direction of "you don't have the standard kernel". I really want to limit my time spent on such problems. Should I expect more trouble, like for my ZFS pools, when going back to the standard Debian kernel?

  • I am wondering though if it is still necessary to opt for Proxmox kernel. If I had to choose between "latest and newest and highest performance" vs "stable and not bothering me and allowing me to easily follow tutorials the standard way", I would definitely opt for the second. I sometimes run into issues like, when trying to set up a VM with KVM or optimizing power consumption with cpupower and the error messages point into the direction of "you don't have the standard kernel". I really want to limit my time spent on such problems. Should I expect more trouble, like for my ZFS pools, when going back to the standard Debian kernel?

    I consider the proxmox kernel to be more stable than the backports Debian kernel. Not sure what kvm issues you have but it is designed to run kvm machines on proxmox (which is debian userland). I run the proxmox kernel on all systems and have no issues with it. zfs is supported on proxmox as well. So, you shouldn't see any issues there either.

    omv 5.6.13 usul | 64 bit | 5.11 proxmox kernel | omvextrasorg 5.6.2 | kvm plugin 5.1.6
    omv-extras.org plugins source code and issue tracker - github


    Please read this before posting a question.
    Please don't PM for support... Too many PMs!

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