rsync failure

  • Hello

    I'm a complete OMV novice with zero experience of Unix type command structures, despite spending the last 20 years of my working life on ICL mainframes. I've set up an OMV server on a Raspberry Pi 4 with two USB3 connected 2TB disks, one with my data, the other intended for a backup. The server's working fine as a shared resource, but the backup isn't. I've been trying to follow the excellent guidance in the OMV New User Guide, and have tried to manually run the scheduled job that I thought I'd created by following the guide.

    The command I've created is

    rsync -av /srv/dev-disk-by-uuid-495b7512-8ca1 -41 d7-aSdd-f77¢584393d1/ /srv/dev-disk-by-uuid-f5a 1a043-ade9-4ad0-b552-1a03e1153a03/

    but it fails with the following message

    Failed to execute command 'export PATH=/bin:/sbin:/usr/bin:/usr/sbin:/usr/local/bin:/usr/local/sbin; export LANG=C.UTF-8; export SHELL=/bin/sh; sudo --shell --non-interactive --user='root' -- /var/lib/openmediavault/cron.d/userdefined-9f6a6e69-975c-4c3d-bead-93c31e4cdd39 2>&1' with exit code '1': rsync: -41: unknown option rsync error: syntax or usage error (code 1) at main.c(1596) [client=3.1.3]

    Could someone please explain what's wrong and how to correct it?

  • Thanks. Having carefully checked my command line I found instances of added spaces, an ‘S’ instead of a ‘5’ and a ‘ç’ in place of a ‘c’. Once corrected the job commenced to run as expected.


    But your advice illustrates the problem those totally unfamiliar with Linux are faced with in following an instruction and reminds me of trying to assist complete computing novices (e.g. “then hit return” – but there isn’t a key marked ‘return’ on most keyboards – the symbol is a hangover from a manual typewriter’s ‘carriage return’ lever.) I’m trying to follow the ‘new-user-guide’ section ‘backing up data’ which explains how to get the uuid for each disk from its mount point. The next bit explains how to set up a scheduled job – but doesn’t advise how to get the uuid into the command – and you can’t copy the content of the mount point field as far as I can see. You say “it is easier if you use auto completion, that means, type the first letters or numbers and the press the TAB key”. I tried that as an edit to the command I’d previously constructed – I deleted everything to leave just “rsync -av /srv/dev-disk-by-uuid-495b7512” and pressed TAB. Nothing happened. So could you explain in more detail please? And if there’s an easy way to construct the command and insert it into the relevant parameter in the ‘Add / Edit scheduled job’ window should that be incorporated into the new-user-guide?


    But thanks again – you put me on the right path.

  • The next bit explains how to set up a scheduled job – but doesn’t advise how to get the uuid into the command – and you can’t copy the content of the mount point field as far as I can see. You say “it is easier if you use auto completion, that means, type the first letters or numbers and the press the TAB key”.

    If you navigate to the drive, using -> WinSCP (also in the guide), you can copy and paste the drive location into your command line (complete with UUID).

    (The following is not a UUID example, but the same concept applies.) Highlight the Address line, Ctrl+c (copy) and Ctrl+v (paste) and paste it into the command line. Add an additional / at the end of the drive location and you're good to go for the drive entry.



    _________________________________________

    The "Drive by UUID" was a midstream change in OMV5 and there didn't seem to be an "elegant" way to patch the existing guide.

    Sorry the guide doesn't quite go into enough detail for you but some conventions (like Enter / Return being the same thing) have to be assumed. The guide is close to 90 standard pages already.

    BTW: The guide is intended to be an "OMV New User Guide". Guides and books for new Linux users, general computing conventions and accuracy in typing ;) are another type of reference altogether.

  • Thanks to both macom and Crashtest.

    (My enter / return comment was only intended to demonstrate how hard it is to know what level of knowledge the reader has - I wasn't trying to suggest the OMV guide should be pitched at the level of those totally alien to computer terminology!)


    Thanks for the WinSCP tip - I'd best carefully reread the whole guide to see what else I've missed - OMV really impresses.


    Coming from a mainframe world of 20 years ago and with a reasonable level of experience supporting PC hardware and using Microsoft software products back to MS-Dos would either of you care to recommend a good Linux primer and a distro to experiment with?

  • I'd best carefully reread the whole guide to see what else I've missed

    If you plan to stick with OMV, it's worth a full read through. The idea is to get started. Later on, this -> web site has a few additional doc's that might be of interest to you.

    OMV really impresses.

    I agree. OMV is very good and it appeals to a wide variety of skill levels, from PC hobbyists up to and including business admin's. I was using Windows Home Server which MS abandoned. Looking for something with the same functionality brought me here where I found a world of server add-ons and actual (real) data protection. The bonus is, OMV is so light on resources it will run from a Raspberry Pi 4 nicely (a low cost single board computer). That makes for cheap backup.

    Frankly, I wouldn't have paid the price for WHS upgrades even if they'd have continued to support it. It's far easier to throw $10 USD at OMV, to help keep it going, where I can have my cake and eat it too. With Dockers and other server add-on's, advanced tech is in the hands of PC enthusiasts at no cost (except for a modest donation here and there).


    Coming from a mainframe world of 20 years ago and with a reasonable level of experience supporting PC hardware and using Microsoft software products back to MS-Dos would either of you care to recommend a good Linux primer and a distro to experiment with?

    I'm in roughly the same age group you are. Realize the following are my personal preferences but, when I started to look, I was looking from something that was roughly similar to a Windows Desktop.

    In general, I'd go with a desktop distro based on Debian or Ubuntu (Ubuntu is, ultimately, based on Debian). My preference for a Desktop was KDE because I liked the native applications. KDE app's are nicely polished. However, there's nothing wrong with XFCE for hardware that's older and a bit under powered. XFCE is similar to Windows 7.

    You can get a sense of distro popularity here -> Distrowatch.com (Look at the lower right, "Page Hits", column.)
    For distro's that approximate Windows, this is worth a look. -> Linux for Windows Users

    I think the best Linux primer is just "do it". Spin up a Linux desktop and, when you run into issues, search the net for answers. There's a lot of free references and tutorials on-line.

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