Is OMV 6 ready for partial prime time?

  • I believe that I am ready to re-install once again, now that I have a better understanding of things. I am running under Proxmox and OMV 5 has worked pretty well. I had initially upgraded to OMV 6 (and the performance was not bad at all), but degraded because I felt that I needed the proxmox kernel (because I wanted to make use of ZFS). After downgrading, I realized that I because of the drive enclosure that I was using (a USB3/eSATA enclosure), I found that I was not going to be able to use ZFS. Nevertheless, using snapraid I was able to make use of my enclosure and life was good with setting up docker.


    So I decided that I wanted to blow away my currently layout and start anew. Since there hasn't been any real issue with using OMV 6 (or so I have read), is there any pitfalls if I opt to upgrade to OMV 6? I know that I will not be able to Proxmox kernel, but considering that I am not making use of ZFS, am I losing any performance using the vanilla kernel? I figure I could start setting up OMV 6 so that when then time moves from Alpha/Beta version to mainstream I am ready for the roll out?


    Any thoughts about that or should I say with OMV 5 and wait?

  • kcallis

    Changed the title of the thread from “It OMV 6 ready for partial prime time?” to “Is OMV 6 ready for partial prime time?”.
  • kcallis

    Added the Label OMV 6.x (beta)
  • I just read over the omvplugin and more importantly thread one by mod. I have answered my own question, and I guess I will ride it out with OMV 5 once again.

  • kcallis

    Added the Label resolved
  • I've been running it for about 3 months, but my setup is pretty simple.

    • Plex installed on the hardware
    • Basic File server for local network use only (NFS / SMB shares)
    • Portainer running a couple of dockers
      • Tautulli (Plex Analytics tool)
      • Pi-hole

    I've had to work around a few bugs -- that have been fixed already and had a single glitch when updating to 6.0-26 but other than that no issues at all.

  • but degraded because I felt that I needed the proxmox kernel (because I wanted to make use of ZFS)

    Proxmox is not required to use ZFS. Debian supports ZFS.

    The best thanks to the help provided is to report what your solution was. The next one will thank you :thumbup:

  • Proxmox is not required to use ZFS. Debian supports ZFS.

    Yes, but not, you need a lot of manual work to use ZFS in a non Proxmox system, and definetly ZFS is not installed by default, you need to install packages to use ZFS on Debian.

  • In OMV 5 the ZFS plugin prepares the system for ZFS, no CLI is required. It is as easy as installing the plugin.

    Once installed you may need CLI if you need special ZFS options. The plug-in does not cover all the ZFS configuration options, but it does cover the "normal" ones. For a "standard" configuration the plugin would be sufficient.


    In OMV 6 the plugin is not ready yet, it would be necessary to install and configure ZFS manually, of course. And yes, it takes a bit of work and requires a medium CLI proficiency. But Proxmox is still not necessary. Proxmox makes it easier because the Ubuntu kernel already has support for ZFS. In Debian you have to implement it (it does not have it implemented by default due to licensing issues).

    The best thanks to the help provided is to report what your solution was. The next one will thank you :thumbup:

  • Normally ZFS is my go to, considering that I am just using OMV strictly for media purposes, it is not important to have ZFS in play. On the other hand, snapraid is another issue. I know that somewhere down the line, snapraid will be working in the future, right now it is on the pipeline. So that is a major reason to stay with OMV 5 for the time being.

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