Posts by mi-hol

    Did you do your homework related to '6. Low on power usage for 24*7 operational economics'?

    From my view ARM processors are the proper solution to 6. and Apple and AWS seem to see it the same way.

    I'd buy a RPi4 Compute Module (CM) with max RAM today, but availability seems currently bad.


    From my view there is a mismatch of "high performance CPU & RAM (ie in Spec 4) versus low performance HDDs".

    Did you check 'My NAS Build" section of forum?

    shadowlord searching a bit gives the answer on what to expect from this specific HDD

    https://www.cloudwards.net/western-digital-elements-review/

    "Our Western Digital Elements review ... our experience with the drive, we’ll give you our verdict, which will determine if the Elements drives can make it on our best external hard drives list or if they’re just another mediocre option.

    The answer is a bit of both. An Elements drive is a great way to get a lot of storage for cheap, but you’ll need to deal with the slow spinning disk, as well as a shroud that doesn’t inspire a lot of confidence. That’s true for most inexpensive external hard drives and, unfortunately, Western Digital doesn’t seem interested in going against the status quo."


    From my view the specific HDD you tried is not a good fit for a NAS (as you already experienced)

    To allow for a comparison of apples to apples

    Pi4 omv 5.5.19-1 (usul) on RPi4 with 4GB RAM and 2x 6TB Toshiba HDWT360 HDD in Icy Box IB-RD3662-C31 /RAID1

    Performance of OMV SMB share connected via wired 1Gb Ethernet versus 2 WLAN routers using (802.11n) & (802.11.ac = WiFi5) protocol

    measured with CrystalDiskMark 8


    1) Connected via 1Gbit switch & wired Ethernet performance

    [Read]

    SEQ 1MiB (Q= 8, T= 1): 93.033 MB/s [ 88.7 IOPS] < 88762.80 us>

    SEQ 1MiB (Q= 1, T= 1): 95.386 MB/s [ 91.0 IOPS] < 10926.24 us>

    RND 4KiB (Q= 32, T= 1): 43.243 MB/s [ 10557.4 IOPS] < 3026.89 us>

    RND 4KiB (Q= 1, T= 1): 8.415 MB/s [ 2054.4 IOPS] < 485.29 us>


    [Write]

    SEQ 1MiB (Q= 8, T= 1): 117.253 MB/s [ 111.8 IOPS] < 70680.67 us>

    SEQ 1MiB (Q= 1, T= 1): 111.385 MB/s [ 106.2 IOPS] < 9401.16 us>

    RND 4KiB (Q= 32, T= 1): 26.701 MB/s [ 6518.8 IOPS] < 4891.26 us>

    RND 4KiB (Q= 1, T= 1): 9.575 MB/s [ 2337.6 IOPS] < 426.58 us>


    2) Connected via WiFi/WLAN(802.11n) (WiFi router was old single core model)

    [Read]

    SEQ 1MiB (Q= 8, T= 1): 6.081 MB/s [ 5.8 IOPS] <1174090.67 us>

    SEQ 1MiB (Q= 1, T= 1): 5.868 MB/s [ 5.6 IOPS] <174304.11 us>

    RND 4KiB (Q= 32, T= 1): 5.715 MB/s [ 1395.3 IOPS] < 22828.59 us>

    RND 4KiB (Q= 1, T= 1): 1.284 MB/s [ 313.5 IOPS] < 3165.95 us>


    [Write]

    SEQ 1MiB (Q= 8, T= 1): 11.743 MB/s [ 11.2 IOPS] <655514.79 us>

    SEQ 1MiB (Q= 1, T= 1): 10.059 MB/s [ 9.6 IOPS] <102725.05 us>

    RND 4KiB (Q= 32, T= 1): 9.650 MB/s [ 2356.0 IOPS] < 13529.73 us>

    RND 4KiB (Q= 1, T= 1): 1.301 MB/s [ 317.6 IOPS] < 3122.85 us>


    3) Connected via WiFi/WLAN (802.11n) (WiFi router was new dual core model)

    [Read]

    SEQ 1MiB (Q= 8, T= 1): 14.224 MB/s [ 13.6 IOPS] <555902.87 us>

    SEQ 1MiB (Q= 1, T= 1): 13.617 MB/s [ 13.0 IOPS] < 76838.01 us>

    RND 4KiB (Q= 32, T= 1): 11.329 MB/s [ 2765.9 IOPS] < 11534.01 us>

    RND 4KiB (Q= 1, T= 1): 1.989 MB/s [ 485.6 IOPS] < 2052.90 us>


    [Write]

    SEQ 1MiB (Q= 8, T= 1): 12.163 MB/s [ 11.6 IOPS] <641750.03 us>

    SEQ 1MiB (Q= 1, T= 1): 11.296 MB/s [ 10.8 IOPS] < 92317.61 us>

    RND 4KiB (Q= 32, T= 1): 10.876 MB/s [ 2655.3 IOPS] < 12013.82 us>

    RND 4KiB (Q= 1, T= 1): 1.876 MB/s [ 458.0 IOPS] < 2174.58 us>


    3) Connected via WiFi/WLAN (802.11ac) (WiFi router was new dual core model)

    [Read]

    SEQ 1MiB (Q= 8, T= 1): 38.377 MB/s [ 36.6 IOPS] <213709.02 us>

    SEQ 1MiB (Q= 1, T= 1): 19.925 MB/s [ 19.0 IOPS] < 52194.71 us>

    RND 4KiB (Q= 32, T= 1): 21.056 MB/s [ 5140.6 IOPS] < 6176.01 us>

    RND 4KiB (Q= 1, T= 1): 1.745 MB/s [ 426.0 IOPS] < 2339.12 us>
    [Write]

    SEQ 1MiB (Q= 8, T= 1): 31.042 MB/s [ 29.6 IOPS] <261352.52 us>

    SEQ 1MiB (Q= 1, T= 1): 17.825 MB/s [ 17.0 IOPS] < 58443.87 us>

    RND 4KiB (Q= 32, T= 1): 15.042 MB/s [ 3672.4 IOPS] < 8691.43 us>

    RND 4KiB (Q= 1, T= 1): 1.734 MB/s [ 423.3 IOPS] < 2348.94 us>



    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------



    Profile: Default

    Test: 64 MiB (x5) [Z: 22% (1237/5544GiB)]

    Mode: [Admin]

    Time: Measure 5 sec / Interval 5 sec

    Date: 2020/12/20 15:53:48

    Client OS: Windows 10 Professional [10.0 Build 19042] (x64)

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    Server:

    root@nas:~# lsusb -t

    /: Bus 02.Port 1: Dev 1, Class=root_hub, Driver=xhci_hcd/4p, 5000M

    |__ Port 2: Dev 2, If 0, Class=Mass Storage, Driver=uas, 5000M

    /: Bus 01.Port 1: Dev 1, Class=root_hub, Driver=xhci_hcd/1p, 480M

    |__ Port 1: Dev 2, If 0, Class=Hub, Driver=hub/4p, 480M

    root@nas:~# uname -a

    Linux nas 5.4.79-v7l+ #1373 SMP Mon Nov 23 13:27:40 GMT 2020 armv7l GNU/Linux


    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    CrystalDiskMark 8.0.0 x64 (C) 2007-2020 hiyohiyo


    Crystal Dew World: https://crystalmark.info/

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    * MB/s = 1,000,000 bytes/s [SATA/600 = 600,000,000 bytes/s]

    * KB = 1000 bytes, KiB = 1024 bytes

    low quality USB cables or even a USB gender adapter reduce transfer speed significantly.

    1.) try original USB cable supplied by Western Digital (USB cables all look the same, hence the right one is hard to find)

    2) test with a HDD benchmark application ( I use CrystalDiskMark)

    3) repeat step 2 with other cable(s) until you find one giving acceptable performance, mark this cable with a tag

    Sorry no help for software RAID either, but for the final setup I'd recommend to use the existing '250GB operating system disk (less than 20% used)' instead of the SD card. This should give you a much higher reliability (except if this HDD is at end-of-life, so check the HDD's SMART parameters before switching over!) I use CrystalDiskInfo to check SMART parameters

    192.168.0.95 isn't used in my network yet.

    Would below command to create macvlan be correct?


    ip_subnet="192.168.0"

    host_if=eth0

    sudo docker network create -d macvlan -o parent=${host_if} \

    --subnet=${ip_subnet}.0/24 --gateway=${ip_subnet}.1 --ip-range=${ip_subnet}.95/32 \

     pihole_network

    1) Maybe you can ask specific questions and then we might be able to help.



    2) If I were you, I would tackle one issue after the other and open one thread for each.

    re 1) I found a tutorial that seems applicable for OMV5 at https://www.wundertech.net/how…i-hole-on-openmediavault/


    the point I struggle is at

    Code
    9. Next, you need to run the command below while substituting the correct subnet (most are 192.168.1.0/24 by default) and network interface ID (mine is enxb827eb03ae0e). You also need to pick an IP address that you’d like to use that’s not currently in use. I will be using 192.168.1.195.'

    what is meant by "correct subnet (most are 192.168.1.0/24 by default)".

    There is a hidden rule to be applied to input data so a judgement for "correct" (or incorrect) can be made.

    I need a written (simple) procedure or tool to come up with a correct result.

    In my mind something along the lines:

    1. get ip address of your router (shell command is unknown to me, but believe its 192.168.0.1 in my setup )
    2. get all network interface via ifconfig
    3. filter result of 2. for substring (start up to 3rd dot) of router ip (this is the part I'm not confident)

    Note: I'd hope a tools exists to overcome exactly this lack of knowledge, but I've not found it yet :(



    re 2) sure step-by-step is the best approach, but the end goal needs to be known at start of journey, because of the many "left or right" decision one has to take along the way. It's easy to get lost otherwise, this common wisdom is confirmed by the many failed projects I've seen in my career.