You've heard it before -- "...I'm building a NAS...I need..."

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    • You've heard it before -- "...I'm building a NAS...I need..."

      I came real close to buying a Synology 918+ this week but now I'm ALL IN for the OMV solution (and I might add - MORE EXCITED than with the 918+ purchase anticipation). I've searched the forums but can't really get zeroed in on answers for a direction to proceed. So here goes. Please offer some advice. I'd really appreciate it. I've built my last three computers but with this NAS situation it seems to be a slightly different mindset versus going for the gusto of a rockin' PC.

      My OMV needs per our home's current status:
      1. File / document sharing in a 2 person household
      2. 3 PC's, 1 laptop, 2 tablets, 2 cell phones, HDHomeRun tuner, OTA antenna, Samsung 46" HDTV (might get a 4K in a few years), large multi function printer, 16 port switch, ASUS RT-N66U running Shibby Tomato firmware
      3. Eventual Plex serving for photos and minimal videos / DVR / VERY minimal transcoding
      4. Minimal SOHO needs for storing data
      5. RAID for redundancy (of which I know nothing about how to do) (plan on deploying 3 each WD Red 3TB drives)
      6. Will be (and currently am) doing external hard drive backups and running GoodSync for synchronization
      7. Remote access to files and the NAS
      8. Maybe VPN or OpenVPN ( I don't know much about that either) (nothing to hide, just don't like the idea of ISP's butting in on my day)
      9. I think that's about all I might be requiring/utilizing regarding OMV; keeping in mind I'll more than likely learn more great features about OMV as time goes on
      My assumed Hardware needs:
      1. As far as I've gotten is possibly zeroing in on a Fractal Node 304 or 804; very open to other ideas
      2. Would definitely like to go Quad Core (just because I like power; I'm not a fan of Celeron) (uncertain on AMD vs Intel) (Probably can figure this one out once I'm advised on an AMD or Intel motherboard)
      3. Stumped on motherboard (ECC or Non ECC, multiple SATA connections for 6 to 8 drives max; probably a separate SATA card????, on board vs card graphics????, etc. etc)
      4. Quad Core / Motherboard / RAM / etc. would like to be as energy efficient as possible
      5. All connections are hardwired Ethernet in our house; don't like WiFi even though we have an ASUS RT-N66U running Shibby Tomato firmware
      6. Stumped on cooler requirements
      7. Stumped on ECC or non ECC (this subject I've heard talked about for years; I want stability and reliability doesn't matter if ECC or non ECC)
      8. I guess I need just a plain 'ol PSU, nothing fancy I guess
      So, anyway that's all I can think of for now. I am not trying to get the forum to build my NAS - I can do that just fine - I would just like to do this build correctly and not learn from mistakes. I'm a little more stressed in life than I was 5 years ago. Surfing the OMV forums gave me some information on hardware but yet I can see TONS of hours trying to determine good combinations. That's why I'm asking for some help. Thank you for your time. Hopefully in the future once I become more of a savvy OMV operator I'll be able to help out someone in my same situation. 8)
      Kai :thumbup:

      My offering to the tech world: The great thing about being a NOOB is - You'll always be a NOOB . . . Why? . . . Because, every day you may learn something NOO that you didn't know an hour earlier . . . and sometimes, many times over . . . all in the same day. Someday we'll all grow old, but, we'll never be too old or too smart to learn something NOO. That said . . . it's just another day.

      Current OMV4 OPERATING ENVIRONMENT: ASRock AB350Pro4 Mobo, AMD A8-9600 Bristol Ridge Quad-Core 3.1 GHz, 16GB Ram, Kingston A400 120GB SSD, WD Blue 4TB HDD

      Backup OMV4 OPERATING ENVIRONMENT: Windows 10 Pro 64bit (always latest build) Intel Core 2 Quad Q9550 2.83GHz 8GB ram; OMV 4.1.13-amd64 Linux Debian running virtual via VirtualBox v5.2.22
      DATA Backup - Two sets of identical backups using GoodSync 1-way backup onto 2 external drives (very nice EASY backup solution).
    • I guess I'm doing something wrong on this forum. This is my second thread and I'm getting nowhere fast. Either I'm posting in the wrong places or I'm too lengthy with my questions. Could someone help me with where I'm going wrong. I want this OMV thing to work really bad but I don't know, it might be a wrong choice over Synology. I hope not.
      Kai :thumbup:

      My offering to the tech world: The great thing about being a NOOB is - You'll always be a NOOB . . . Why? . . . Because, every day you may learn something NOO that you didn't know an hour earlier . . . and sometimes, many times over . . . all in the same day. Someday we'll all grow old, but, we'll never be too old or too smart to learn something NOO. That said . . . it's just another day.

      Current OMV4 OPERATING ENVIRONMENT: ASRock AB350Pro4 Mobo, AMD A8-9600 Bristol Ridge Quad-Core 3.1 GHz, 16GB Ram, Kingston A400 120GB SSD, WD Blue 4TB HDD

      Backup OMV4 OPERATING ENVIRONMENT: Windows 10 Pro 64bit (always latest build) Intel Core 2 Quad Q9550 2.83GHz 8GB ram; OMV 4.1.13-amd64 Linux Debian running virtual via VirtualBox v5.2.22
      DATA Backup - Two sets of identical backups using GoodSync 1-way backup onto 2 external drives (very nice EASY backup solution).
    • Kai wrote:

      I guess I'm doing something wrong on this forum. This is my second thread and I'm getting nowhere fast. Either I'm posting in the wrong places or I'm too lengthy with my questions. Could someone help me with where I'm going wrong. I want this OMV thing to work really bad but I don't know, it might be a wrong choice over Synology. I hope not.
      You just need to be patient. Your other thread probably didn't get any responses because it has been discussed many times. Lots of people run OMV as a virtual machine including myself.

      As for the hardware, there is no right answer for most of your questions. Here are my opinions:

      1 - good case. can't think of a better one right at the moment
      2 - sounds fine
      3 - I don't think you need ECC but it definitely doesn't hurt. No need for a separate sata card. graphics don't matter since OMV is supposed to be headless with no desktop environment. Find a motherboard on newegg that gets good ratings that is in the right price range and size. You seem to lean toward intel so go with it.
      4 - 4gb of ram would probably be fine for your needs
      5 - helps
      6 - OEM cooler is probably fine
      7 - see #3
      8 - If it is going to run 24/7, get a platinum 80+ PSU.
      omv 4.1.22 arrakis | 64 bit | 4.15 proxmox kernel | omvextrasorg 4.1.15
      omv-extras.org plugins source code and issue tracker - github

      Please read this before posting a question and this and this for docker questions.
      Please don't PM for support... Too many PMs!
    • Take a look at this guide for general build information and how to get started.
      _________________________________________________________________________

      Things that would help, in advance, is at least some idea of the size of your data store. This would help you to determine what size and/or how many disks. In the guide, general guidance along these lines is provision storage that will house your current data store with a 25 to 50% fill rate. So, 6TB of disk real-estate would be a good start for 1.5 to 3TB. (This is GENERAL guidance.) Depending on the size of disks used, you'd have an indicator of the case needed, sata ports, etc.)

      Traditional RAID,,, generally not a good idea. RAID is about availability, not redundancy and it's certainly not backup. (These are common misunderstandings.) If you fully backup your data store, to an internal or external disk, the risk of data loss is substantially reduced. Backup is far more important than RAID.

      I have a preference for ZFS, but couldn't recommend it. It has great features and can be used right out of the box, but understanding what it is, how to use it's features, etc., takes a bit of time. I'm not using it for availability either. It's a zmirror (the rough equivalent of RAID 1) used solely for bitrot protection and self healing files.

      The safe disk array alternative, if that's what you're looking for (combining disks into a pool), would be a combination of UnionFS and SNAPRAID. (They're simple and reliable but, again, if you haven't heard of them before there's a slight learning curve.)

      The easiest possible way to set up a data store, with full backup, is with two disks (6TB each). Disk 1 is the data store, and Disk 2 is a full 100% backup, using Rsync. This can be automated and how to do it is in the guide.

      If you want to expand later, UnionFS can be used to expand the data store and, with an extra disk added for SNAPRAID you'd have the functional equivalent of a RAID array. (But with better features when compared to traditional RAID.)

      Transcoding requirements are in the guide but it should be noted that, if using a utility like handbrake, media files can be recoded to a native format for phones and tablets. (There's a video how-to for doing this automatically.) Without transcoding, streaming in a native format is rough equivalent of a slow file copy. Accordingly, CPU requirements drop dramatically.
      ______________________________________________

      For Client backup, I'm using UrBackup with a separate 3TB drive that's not part of my data store. If you don't keep large data stores on clients drives (data really should be on a server) a 2 or 3TB drive will be sufficient for your client backup needs, as stated.
      ______________________________________________

      In any server platform ECC is recommend along with some form of bitrot protection for the data store.
      (Another excellent feature of SNAPRAID.)

      ______________________________________________

      Before diving in with a hardware purchase, without really understanding what you need, have you got an old PC? You could build OMV on it and see if it's what you're looking for. Build OMV on a USB drive and use the internal drive as a data disk. (Or maybe buy a 6TB drive, install it, and go from there?)

      I'll say this much from experience, OMV on x64 platforms is stable, easy to use, and highly extensible. If you go this way, I think you'll be surprised at the numerous server add-on's and Dockers available. From a simple (but technically sophfisticated) file server, to media servers, downloaders, a Virtual Box platform for virtualization, there's something in OMV for everyone.

      QNAP? If you don't want to invest a bit of time and effort, maybe a QNAP is for you. On the other hand, you'll be shelling out a premium for the hardware and, when they stop supporting it (as all commercial products do), you might end up right back here, installing OMV on it as a new operating system.
    • flmaxey, thank you so much for replying. Now I have something to start studying and absorbing.
      Kai :thumbup:

      My offering to the tech world: The great thing about being a NOOB is - You'll always be a NOOB . . . Why? . . . Because, every day you may learn something NOO that you didn't know an hour earlier . . . and sometimes, many times over . . . all in the same day. Someday we'll all grow old, but, we'll never be too old or too smart to learn something NOO. That said . . . it's just another day.

      Current OMV4 OPERATING ENVIRONMENT: ASRock AB350Pro4 Mobo, AMD A8-9600 Bristol Ridge Quad-Core 3.1 GHz, 16GB Ram, Kingston A400 120GB SSD, WD Blue 4TB HDD

      Backup OMV4 OPERATING ENVIRONMENT: Windows 10 Pro 64bit (always latest build) Intel Core 2 Quad Q9550 2.83GHz 8GB ram; OMV 4.1.13-amd64 Linux Debian running virtual via VirtualBox v5.2.22
      DATA Backup - Two sets of identical backups using GoodSync 1-way backup onto 2 external drives (very nice EASY backup solution).
    • Really an old PC is the way to go, to figure things out, and most old PC's have at least 2 sata ports, possibly 4. If booting from a USB drive, 2 spinning drives for data is enough and a USB dock or adapter could be used for a dedicated UrBackup drive. Work on it, tune it, backup data, clone the OS, etc. You'll get an idea of the performance you want / need, disk space requirements, etc.

      What's really nice about OMV is that you might be able to move a preconfigured USB boot drive to another hardware platform, plugin your data drives and be in business on better hardware.

      The post was edited 1 time, last by crashtest: edit ().

    • ryecoaaron wrote:

      Kai wrote:

      I guess I'm doing something wrong on this forum. This is my second thread and I'm getting nowhere fast. Either I'm posting in the wrong places or I'm too lengthy with my questions. Could someone help me with where I'm going wrong. I want this OMV thing to work really bad but I don't know, it might be a wrong choice over Synology. I hope not.
      You just need to be patient. Your other thread probably didn't get any responses because it has been discussed many times. Lots of people run OMV as a virtual machine including myself. . . .
      I understand the patience comment and appreciate you emphasizing it. I lack in that category and will tame it down.

      So that brings me to this . . . I was really originally thinking about running OMV virtually in a computer that I have with Windows 10 Pro 64 bit in the basement . . . Asus P5ND motherboard, Intel Q9550 Core 2 Quad 2.83 GHz, 2x2GB Mushkin PC26400 + 2 x 2GB GSkill PC2 6400 (8GB ram), Zalman CNPS9500A cooler, 3 each 3.5 bays (2 occupied), 2 empty floppy bays, 2 free PCI slots, 1 free PCIE slot, 4 SATA 3GB/s ports, 3 case fans, a 22" monitor, and a Logitech wireless mouse and keyboard. This PC runs ridiculously slow when booting up but it serves well as an occasional 1x per week work station for the basement for internet surfing and light office application work. It is also probably a significant electricity hog if it were to run 24/7.

      Like I said my original thought was to run OMV in a virtual mode on that PC so that I could still have Windows 10 Pro 64 bit available for occasional use. HOWEVER, I have never run anything virtual and I know nothing about how to do so.

      Right now I just need a file server, a remote file server, and something that will allow me to 'possibly' run Plex as a DVR and photos categorizer. RAID, I guess, is not a matter/concern with me right now. I then need to figure out the best way to backup data. My current backup environment is AOMEI system images and then using GoodSync to sync a few external and internal drives. I do not have any need whatsoever to stream movies on devices. We watch our 46" Samsung HDTV and Netfilx on a tablet occasionally. We are more or less a very light/minimal small office home office type scenario.

      My P5ND machine would most likely allow me to get started with OMV. I just don't know the HOW of setting it up in the virtual environment.

      Is this machine adequate? How do I go about setting up OMV in a virtual environment?

      The link from flmaxey for getting started with OMV is helping some but still doesn't seem to get me into fully understanding the HOW of setting up and running OMV in a virtual environment.

      OR - I can scrap the virtual idea and just build up an inexpensive NAS box; keeping the PC for a slow Windows 10 experience. One of the things that's slowing me down on the idea of an inexpensive NAS box is the ECC issue. I'm having difficulty in finding an inexpensive ECC motherboard.
      Kai :thumbup:

      My offering to the tech world: The great thing about being a NOOB is - You'll always be a NOOB . . . Why? . . . Because, every day you may learn something NOO that you didn't know an hour earlier . . . and sometimes, many times over . . . all in the same day. Someday we'll all grow old, but, we'll never be too old or too smart to learn something NOO. That said . . . it's just another day.

      Current OMV4 OPERATING ENVIRONMENT: ASRock AB350Pro4 Mobo, AMD A8-9600 Bristol Ridge Quad-Core 3.1 GHz, 16GB Ram, Kingston A400 120GB SSD, WD Blue 4TB HDD

      Backup OMV4 OPERATING ENVIRONMENT: Windows 10 Pro 64bit (always latest build) Intel Core 2 Quad Q9550 2.83GHz 8GB ram; OMV 4.1.13-amd64 Linux Debian running virtual via VirtualBox v5.2.22
      DATA Backup - Two sets of identical backups using GoodSync 1-way backup onto 2 external drives (very nice EASY backup solution).
    • I HAVE NO FREAKING IDEA WHY THE POST TRIPLED ON ME. I TRIED TO DELETE TWO BUT CAN"T. When I tried to post, the editor created an exception error but then went ahead and made the reply post anyway. Sorry.
      Kai :thumbup:

      My offering to the tech world: The great thing about being a NOOB is - You'll always be a NOOB . . . Why? . . . Because, every day you may learn something NOO that you didn't know an hour earlier . . . and sometimes, many times over . . . all in the same day. Someday we'll all grow old, but, we'll never be too old or too smart to learn something NOO. That said . . . it's just another day.

      Current OMV4 OPERATING ENVIRONMENT: ASRock AB350Pro4 Mobo, AMD A8-9600 Bristol Ridge Quad-Core 3.1 GHz, 16GB Ram, Kingston A400 120GB SSD, WD Blue 4TB HDD

      Backup OMV4 OPERATING ENVIRONMENT: Windows 10 Pro 64bit (always latest build) Intel Core 2 Quad Q9550 2.83GHz 8GB ram; OMV 4.1.13-amd64 Linux Debian running virtual via VirtualBox v5.2.22
      DATA Backup - Two sets of identical backups using GoodSync 1-way backup onto 2 external drives (very nice EASY backup solution).
    • Kai wrote:

      I HAVE NO FREAKING IDEA WHY THE POST TRIPLED ON ME. I TRIED TO DELETE TWO BUT CAN"T. When I tried to post, the editor created an exception error but then went ahead and made the reply post anyway. Sorry.
      Not sure why you can't delete (I did) but read #4 from Solutions to common problems


      Kai wrote:

      HOWEVER, I have never run anything virtual and I know nothing about how to do so.
      It really isn't any different. You can connect to a virtual console that is the same as using a physical system. Try it.

      Kai wrote:

      RAID, I guess, is not a matter/concern with me right now.I then need to figure out the best way to backup data.
      Raid is not backup. It is just redundancy.

      Kai wrote:

      Is this machine adequate?
      Yep.

      Kai wrote:

      How do I go about setting up OMV in a virtual environment?
      Install virtualbox.
      Create a new virtual machine
      Attach the OMV 4.x iso to the VM's cdrom drive
      boot and install
      Use just like physical machine. Try it, It really isn't difficult and there are lots of virtualbox tutorials on the web.

      Kai wrote:

      still doesn't seem to get me into fully understanding the HOW of setting up and running OMV in a virtual environment.
      Once OMV is running, nothing is really different in the virtual environment. Watch the videos about how to use OMV - Installation and Setup Videos - Beginning, Intermediate and Advanced


      Kai wrote:

      I'm having difficulty in finding an inexpensive ECC motherboard.
      Then don't get one. I run OMV on plenty of systems without ECC.
      omv 4.1.22 arrakis | 64 bit | 4.15 proxmox kernel | omvextrasorg 4.1.15
      omv-extras.org plugins source code and issue tracker - github

      Please read this before posting a question and this and this for docker questions.
      Please don't PM for support... Too many PMs!
    • TechnoDadLife wrote:

      I made a video about installing in virtual machines here.
      Thanks TechnoDadLife. I had just come across your video online before seeing your reply. I will watch and also check out your other videos. Thanks for helping.
      Kai :thumbup:

      My offering to the tech world: The great thing about being a NOOB is - You'll always be a NOOB . . . Why? . . . Because, every day you may learn something NOO that you didn't know an hour earlier . . . and sometimes, many times over . . . all in the same day. Someday we'll all grow old, but, we'll never be too old or too smart to learn something NOO. That said . . . it's just another day.

      Current OMV4 OPERATING ENVIRONMENT: ASRock AB350Pro4 Mobo, AMD A8-9600 Bristol Ridge Quad-Core 3.1 GHz, 16GB Ram, Kingston A400 120GB SSD, WD Blue 4TB HDD

      Backup OMV4 OPERATING ENVIRONMENT: Windows 10 Pro 64bit (always latest build) Intel Core 2 Quad Q9550 2.83GHz 8GB ram; OMV 4.1.13-amd64 Linux Debian running virtual via VirtualBox v5.2.22
      DATA Backup - Two sets of identical backups using GoodSync 1-way backup onto 2 external drives (very nice EASY backup solution).
    • rycoaaron - thanks for your help. The forum is definitely helping me get on track.

      Another clarification needed - Can Windows 10 be used while OMV is virtual in the background?
      Kai :thumbup:

      My offering to the tech world: The great thing about being a NOOB is - You'll always be a NOOB . . . Why? . . . Because, every day you may learn something NOO that you didn't know an hour earlier . . . and sometimes, many times over . . . all in the same day. Someday we'll all grow old, but, we'll never be too old or too smart to learn something NOO. That said . . . it's just another day.

      Current OMV4 OPERATING ENVIRONMENT: ASRock AB350Pro4 Mobo, AMD A8-9600 Bristol Ridge Quad-Core 3.1 GHz, 16GB Ram, Kingston A400 120GB SSD, WD Blue 4TB HDD

      Backup OMV4 OPERATING ENVIRONMENT: Windows 10 Pro 64bit (always latest build) Intel Core 2 Quad Q9550 2.83GHz 8GB ram; OMV 4.1.13-amd64 Linux Debian running virtual via VirtualBox v5.2.22
      DATA Backup - Two sets of identical backups using GoodSync 1-way backup onto 2 external drives (very nice EASY backup solution).
    • Kai wrote:

      Can Windows 10 be used while OMV is virtual in the background?
      Yes. You could run lots of virtual machines in background while using Windows 10. Depending on what those VMs are doing, it may slow down Windows 10 though.
      omv 4.1.22 arrakis | 64 bit | 4.15 proxmox kernel | omvextrasorg 4.1.15
      omv-extras.org plugins source code and issue tracker - github

      Please read this before posting a question and this and this for docker questions.
      Please don't PM for support... Too many PMs!
    • ryecoaaron wrote:

      Kai wrote:

      Can Windows 10 be used while OMV is virtual in the background?
      Yes. You could run lots of virtual machines in background while using Windows 10. Depending on what those VMs are doing, it may slow down Windows 10 though.
      Great!!!!!! Now I think I'm getting comfortable in a trial scenario. Now I'm gonna watch TechnoDadLife's videos.
      Kai :thumbup:

      My offering to the tech world: The great thing about being a NOOB is - You'll always be a NOOB . . . Why? . . . Because, every day you may learn something NOO that you didn't know an hour earlier . . . and sometimes, many times over . . . all in the same day. Someday we'll all grow old, but, we'll never be too old or too smart to learn something NOO. That said . . . it's just another day.

      Current OMV4 OPERATING ENVIRONMENT: ASRock AB350Pro4 Mobo, AMD A8-9600 Bristol Ridge Quad-Core 3.1 GHz, 16GB Ram, Kingston A400 120GB SSD, WD Blue 4TB HDD

      Backup OMV4 OPERATING ENVIRONMENT: Windows 10 Pro 64bit (always latest build) Intel Core 2 Quad Q9550 2.83GHz 8GB ram; OMV 4.1.13-amd64 Linux Debian running virtual via VirtualBox v5.2.22
      DATA Backup - Two sets of identical backups using GoodSync 1-way backup onto 2 external drives (very nice EASY backup solution).
    • OMV has been successfully loaded virtually. I really like what I see so far and I see no reason at this time to be considering a Synology or Qnap system. There is no sense in putting money into someone else's pocket to help their retailing markups when I can pick and choose the components that I wish.

      So, now my game plan is to get more familiar with OMV and which of its features I can use right off the bat. Simultaneously, I am starting to research components. I have decided that since the box will be in the basement along side the current OMV virtual machine there is no need for a fancy box. I will be looking for a nice well ventilated box with plenty of options for fans and drives.

      I got hung up for a bit while thinking about ECC vs nonECC. That subject has been talked to death on the internet. No sense going there any longer just for arguments sake. I came across an AMD motherboard and CPU that support both ECC and nonECC. I will put those components in front of the forum shortly for opinions.

      Then I started thinking about this ECC issue. I though about the last 15 years of my non ECC Ram deployment both in a small business and at home. I never lost any data at all. Kinda makes me wonder about the ECC necessity in a small network environment. I can fully understand ECC in the medium to large corporate world. But for a few employees, or a household, I wonder about all the hype. I'm becoming more relaxed that it is an issue blown out of proportion for 9 out of 10 home network environments. I'll probably get attacked on that viewpoint but -really- the logistics are there.

      Next, I'm in deliberation of Intel vs AMD. I have both and cannot gripe about either. I'm considering AMD because I can get much more power for the buck; such as Quad Core and Ryzen CPU's like this one for very reasonable pricing and functionality - apparently even with Plex if I understand specs correctly.

      So anyway that's an update of where I'm at for the moment. Like I said I'm going to put together 1 or two packages to see if the forum can help confirm my objective of reasoning in choices - or even provide me with better suggestions.

      Thanks for your time,
      Kai :thumbup:

      My offering to the tech world: The great thing about being a NOOB is - You'll always be a NOOB . . . Why? . . . Because, every day you may learn something NOO that you didn't know an hour earlier . . . and sometimes, many times over . . . all in the same day. Someday we'll all grow old, but, we'll never be too old or too smart to learn something NOO. That said . . . it's just another day.

      Current OMV4 OPERATING ENVIRONMENT: ASRock AB350Pro4 Mobo, AMD A8-9600 Bristol Ridge Quad-Core 3.1 GHz, 16GB Ram, Kingston A400 120GB SSD, WD Blue 4TB HDD

      Backup OMV4 OPERATING ENVIRONMENT: Windows 10 Pro 64bit (always latest build) Intel Core 2 Quad Q9550 2.83GHz 8GB ram; OMV 4.1.13-amd64 Linux Debian running virtual via VirtualBox v5.2.22
      DATA Backup - Two sets of identical backups using GoodSync 1-way backup onto 2 external drives (very nice EASY backup solution).
    • you mentioned openvpn, assuming you mean as a client. you could run it on the NAS but then only the nas will connect to the vpn (nothing wrong with this), it's a pain to find the info and since I just have set up a connection to private internet access myself today I give you this OpenVPN + PIA - Complete Idiots Guide? other providers will differ

      alternatively you could have your router connect to the VPN and have your entire house protected... though i don't know if your ASUS will be up to snuff, I'm actually planning on setting up a box to run pfsense with the entire house protected.
    • GeekGrrl wrote:

      you mentioned openvpn, assuming you mean as a client. you could run it on the NAS but then only the nas will connect to the vpn (nothing wrong with this), it's a pain to find the info and since I just have set up a connection to private internet access myself today I give you this OpenVPN + PIA - Complete Idiots Guide? other providers will differ

      alternatively you could have your router connect to the VPN and have your entire house protected... though i don't know if your ASUS will be up to snuff, I'm actually planning on setting up a box to run pfsense with the entire house protected.
      Thank you GeekGrrl,

      I will study the link you provided. Yes, I already do have OpenVpn installed and working on the ASUS router. I am using Shibby Tomato as the router's firmware. That allows me to run 2 USB ports on the router as NAS ports with external drives. (Not speedy enough; that's why I'm now doing a full blown NAS with OMV). The OpenVPN is set up inside the Tomato firmware. However, the instructional that I used to perform that task left me hanging at how to set up "multiple" clients. Thus, only my personal PC is set up as a client. Furthermore, the OpenVPN forum/community is very difficult to work with. It is like pulling teeth. If I could figure out how to script the additional clients I would be all set (maybe). I'm not a full blown PC techie but I know just enough to get me so far with things.
      Kai :thumbup:

      My offering to the tech world: The great thing about being a NOOB is - You'll always be a NOOB . . . Why? . . . Because, every day you may learn something NOO that you didn't know an hour earlier . . . and sometimes, many times over . . . all in the same day. Someday we'll all grow old, but, we'll never be too old or too smart to learn something NOO. That said . . . it's just another day.

      Current OMV4 OPERATING ENVIRONMENT: ASRock AB350Pro4 Mobo, AMD A8-9600 Bristol Ridge Quad-Core 3.1 GHz, 16GB Ram, Kingston A400 120GB SSD, WD Blue 4TB HDD

      Backup OMV4 OPERATING ENVIRONMENT: Windows 10 Pro 64bit (always latest build) Intel Core 2 Quad Q9550 2.83GHz 8GB ram; OMV 4.1.13-amd64 Linux Debian running virtual via VirtualBox v5.2.22
      DATA Backup - Two sets of identical backups using GoodSync 1-way backup onto 2 external drives (very nice EASY backup solution).
    • Kai wrote:

      I really like what I see so far and I see no reason at this time to be considering a Synology or Qnap system. There is no sense in putting money into someone else's pocket to help their retailing markups when I can pick and choose the components that I wish.
      I landed here, for similar reasons, after looking for a Windows Home Server replacement. (And, at that point, I mean, I as PO'ed at M$ :cursing: for just dropping it. )

      I tested a number of NAS distro's:
      - From a resources point of view alone (as in not needing very much), OMV stood out. That also means, on the other end of the scale, merely "adequate" hardware turns in a stellar performance. Good hardware simply flies.
      - Flexibility? OMV wins again. One is not locked into a single file system or a particular way of doing things. The options are plentiful and can be tailored to your use case, even if you don't know exactly what your use case will be yet. Flexibility equates to the ability to "evolve".
      - Add-on's. Without a doubt OMV has more going for it, in this category, than anything else out there. After I got my basic NAS running and took care of a crucial need, backing everything up, I started looking at add-ons. This is where I was truly shocked. I had been paying for M$ junk and looking at the ridiculous costs of server add-ons (from Microsoft's partner/accomplices ) and coming to the determination that I couldn't justify the expense.

      With OMV it was, well,, what do you want? (For me, it was like being a kid in a candy store again. :) ) If it's a structural server add-on, look in the base distro's plugins. If what you want to do is not there, load up the OMVextras plugin which enables several additional plugins. At that point, I marveled at the selection of free stuff available for servers - just point and click. ((When if comes to "free", I make it a habit to make a modest donation to anything I use long term. With a bit of support, good projects have "staying" power.)) After that, I spent some time exploring the numerous options.
      - Dockers: OVM has an excellent plugin for Dockers, that takes Docker off of the command line. The community has added value to that plugin by creating numerous How-To's, to make using Dockers easier. if one spends some time to learn the in's and out's of configuring Dockers (an intermediate level pursuit, BTW) there's over 100,000 offerings on the Docker Hub.

      In the bottom line, I was paying "more" for substantially "less" than what is freely available to all. This flies directly into the face of an old axiom, "you get what you pay for". In some cases, "what you pay for" puts you in a box.

      Take and Look and,
      Enjoy!

      The post was edited 1 time, last by crashtest: edit ().

    • Thanks flmaxey, nice RECAP of high points.
      Kai :thumbup:

      My offering to the tech world: The great thing about being a NOOB is - You'll always be a NOOB . . . Why? . . . Because, every day you may learn something NOO that you didn't know an hour earlier . . . and sometimes, many times over . . . all in the same day. Someday we'll all grow old, but, we'll never be too old or too smart to learn something NOO. That said . . . it's just another day.

      Current OMV4 OPERATING ENVIRONMENT: ASRock AB350Pro4 Mobo, AMD A8-9600 Bristol Ridge Quad-Core 3.1 GHz, 16GB Ram, Kingston A400 120GB SSD, WD Blue 4TB HDD

      Backup OMV4 OPERATING ENVIRONMENT: Windows 10 Pro 64bit (always latest build) Intel Core 2 Quad Q9550 2.83GHz 8GB ram; OMV 4.1.13-amd64 Linux Debian running virtual via VirtualBox v5.2.22
      DATA Backup - Two sets of identical backups using GoodSync 1-way backup onto 2 external drives (very nice EASY backup solution).