Mobo and other HW suggestions wanted for new OMV box with ECC

  • That might be true, but I have always err'd on the side of caution.


    Whilst they might be able to take it on paper, I never let a system go above ~65c for any sustained period of time unless I really have no control over it. All my kit is set to keep them low. In the case of my consoles all modded to keep temps down. My trusty XPS with i7-2670QM never goes more than 65c and has never really spiked once it was repasted with MX4 and all the stock crap tidied up.


    Let's assume that the CPU can indeed withstand 90c, I doubt most of the surrounding components would be too happy. It also rises the ambient temp in the box and then we start getting way too close to lead free solder cracking for my liking and HDD's going over 45c. I prefer not to have to reball the south bridge and buy new HDD's after 3 months :-P


    Your temp of 77c when maxed out will probably be fine, but I wouldn't under any circumstances let it reach the 80's.

  • @ftriscari LDAP authentication.


    Joke ;-) this is being built to last with the aim of transcoding 4K to the house... Eventually. I'm not planning to upgrade again for some time. The whole point of a great home server is that it must pass the wife test. These things usually boil down to:


    1. It must just work - no exceptions, when the wife wants her music or movies or whatever on her device of choice, it must work.


    2. No upgrading and piddling around every 6 months with hardware - scheduled software maintenance is allowed ;-)


    This way I can justify the spend :-) actually, she took the lead and suggested the E5's... I was going for an E3.

  • Sounds like a good wife advice to me.


    If you plan to go with DDR4 and want expandability, usual server bells and whistles, it might be a good choice to go with single-socket 2011v3 boards.
    Registered ram gets cheep with time (not compatible with desktops) and allows you to run ridicolous amounts of RAM like say 128GB or 256GB or even 512GB (depending on number of slots and dimm size, it gets pretty damn expensive if you go beyond 128GB).
    At least for ECC DDR3 registered ram, for ddr4 the max per dimm should be 64gb atm, but bigger dims are in the works.
    The processors state that the max ram they support is 756 GB, just throwing it around.


    Asrock Rack has pubblished a bunch of new micro-ATX boards with socket 2011v3, not yet on sale afaik, but probably won't go above 300$ like other boards of the same kind from Asrock.
    This for example http://www.asrockrack.com/gene…=EPC612D4U#Specifications


    Cooler choice is a bit limited by the position, but none is going to complain about a 50$ cooler in project like this anyway.


    It has only 4 ram slots but it takes Registered Ram, you can buy 32GB (2x16GB) of reg dimms for 350 or so, and still have two slots left for upgrade.
    Don't mix registered and non-registered, not gonna work. Don't use non-registered ram on this board at all, if possible.


    On the plus side, this baby's Intel C612 chipset runs 8 sata ports on its own, so that's probably going to rock on its own for a while.


    Asrock seems to be pretty bent into filling the obvious open niches in the home server market, first they do stuff with Avotons (and screw up a bit), now they do this.
    Afaik there are no micro-atx boards for socket 2011v3 (or socket 2011 for that matter).


    For example Supermicro is offering this http://www.supermicro.nl/produ…rd/Xeon/C600/X10SRA-F.cfm
    Which is of course has moar features, like can take 512GB of ram and has moar Sata and PCI-e slots, but it is ATX.
    For the sake of fairness, this board can be found from germany here (list of sites that sell it) http://www.heise.de/preisvergl…-x10sra-f-o-a1195792.html


    Quote

    The 1226v3 is a beast and will cost about £200. That's certainly have enough juice but I
    can't help but think all the lights in my place and the streetlights outside might dim and flicker if everyone starts transcoding 1080p streams!

    First: if you can, don't look for processors whose names end with 5 or 6 (if you are looking for E3 xeons anyway). Those have integrated graphics. In a server board it is dead weight (also not connected). In a server board you have IPMI (can access the bios over ethernet, it totally rocks no matter how you look at it) and a crappy integrated graphics already.


    Second: that baby pulls less power than an i7 (as it is technically a mildly better i7), and even the most aggressive and powerful Xeons around don't pull more than an overclocked FX 8350 (and usually less than a dedicated GPU in most gaming PCs), so it's not going to trip overcurrent safeties in your home.
    Power consumption on idle is less than 5 watts for the processor alone since Sandy and Ivy bridge processors, so even if you have a powerful CPU it's not going to eat power for nothing.
    Heat generation is the main issue, keep an eye on this factor when buying the case, especially for the drives, they like being cooled too.


    Third: all prosumer and server-grade mobos allow you to disable cores (and hyperthreading) to save power when it ramps to 100% (with a hit on performance of course). If you get a too powerful processor through other means (buying new then disabling cores ins't horribly smart use of your own budget unless you get a very good deal) this can save the day.


    Interestingly, the lower end of the server E5 xeons don't cost all that much (compared to the high end ones anyway), with 260-300$ you should be able to get a
    E5-2603v3 or a 2609v3
    Which are technically exacores (6 cores) but being the low end "for-cheap" xeons they are clocked to run more like an i5 as far as performance goes.
    the other low end xeon you can get without robbing a bank first is the E5-1620v3 (which performs more like an i7, and can be found at around 400$, but it has 140w of TDP (heat generation) vs 85 watt of the 2603v3 and 2609v3.
    Check benchmarks and look around to see if what you want it to do can be run and how well on these babies too. otherwise state better the needs, transcoding resolution, amount of transcoding to do at the same time, and so on.


    The main difference between the two is that E5-2603v3 and the 1620v3 is that the former has QPI, so it can be installed in multi-CPU boards to run with another processor, the latter does not, so it is single-processor-board only.
    Still , they are xeons, so they support all the features that server-grade xeons usually support, see here for details
    http://ark.intel.com/products/…620-v3-10M-Cache-3_50-GHz
    http://ark.intel.com/products/…603-v3-15M-Cache-1_60-GHz

  • Sounds like a good wife advice to me.


    Thanks, that's why I married her ;)



    If you plan to go with DDR4 and want expandability, usual server bells and whistles, it might be a good choice to go with single-socket 2011v3 boards.
    Registered ram gets cheep with time (not compatible with desktops) and allows you to run ridicolous amounts of RAM like say 128GB or 256GB or even 512GB (depending on number of slots and dimm size).
    At least for ECC DDR3 registered ram, for ddr4 the max per dimm should be 64gb atm, but bigger dims are in the works.
    The processors state that the max ram they support is 756 GB, just throwing it around.


    I'm on the case, looking at 2 x DDR4-2133 16GB's for £144 each. Not the best memory and not the max, but that can be changed quickly and easily in future.




    Asrock Rack has pubblished a bunch of new micro-ATX boards with socket 2011v3, not yet on sale afaik, but probably won't go above 300$ like other boards of the same kind from Asrock.
    This for example http://www.asrockrack.com/gene…=EPC612D4U#Specifications


    I would love this board, but I cannot find it anywhere, I have searched high and low and it is just too new :'(


    We are considering either the ASRock X99M Extreme 4 or the ASRock X99M Killer - both mATX boards but limited to 64GB so not sure on this yet. It would mean adding another 2 x 16GB's in the future would max them out and avoid wastage - but still... 64GB max. The ASRock X99 Extreme 4 (no M, full ATX) takes 128GB... not sure what we're doing with this at the moment. In any case, all these boards are sub £200 and available, and have a ton of SATA ports and room for expansion.



    Cooler choice is a bit limited by the position, but none is going to complain about a 50$ cooler in project like this anyway.


    Preliminary ideas are a Corsair H100i for £75... need to double check if it will fit in the case we get (which is undecided).



    It has only 4 ram slots but it takes Registered Ram, you can buy 32GB (2x16GB) of reg dimms for 350 or so, and still have two slots left for upgrade.
    Don't mix registered and non-registered, not gonna work.


    Roger that ;) ECC is needed for ZFS.



    On the plus side, this baby's Intel C612 chipset runs 8 sata ports on its own, so that's probably going to rock on its own for a while.


    Asrock seems to be pretty bent into filling the obvious open niches in the home server market, first they do stuff with Avotons (and screw up a bit), now they do this.
    Afaik there are no micro-atx boards for socket 2011v3 (or socket 2011 for that matter).


    See above - X99M's or here pretty sure it's 2011-3


    http://www.supermicro.nl/produ…rd/Xeon/C600/X10SRA-F.cfm
    Which is of course has moar features, like can take 512GB of ram and has moar Sata and PCI-e slots, but it is ATX.
    For the sake of fairness, this board can be found from germany here (list of sites that sell it) http://www.heise.de/preisvergl…-x10sra-f-o-a1195792.html


    Nice... will have a look into it. Germany is fine, no import tax to UK being both in EU.



    First: if you can, don't look for processors whose names end with 5 or 6. Those have integrated graphics. In a server board it is dead weight (also not connected). In a server board you have IPMI (can access the bios over ethernet, it totally rocks no matter how you look at it) and a crappy integrated graphics already.


    Very much agreed. If I can get a server board with IPMI, I of course, will. It's purely what I can get... all the ASRock server boards with IPMI don't seem to be available here yet :( I will make sure I look into the super micro though.



    Second: that baby pulls less power than an i7 (as it is technically a mildly better i7), and even the most aggressive and powerful Xeons around don't pull more than an overclocked FX 8350 (and usually less than a dedicated GPU in most gaming PCs), so it's not going to trip overcurrent safeties in your home. Heat generation is the main issue.


    Hence the water cooling.



    Third: all prosumer and server-grade mobos allow you to disable cores (and hyperthreading) to save power when it ramps to 100% (with a hit on performance of course). If you get a too powerful processor through other means (buying new then disabling cores ins't horribly smart use of your own budget unless you get a very good deal) this can save the day.


    Noted, thanks.



    Yeah, I was up until 3.30am this morning looking through a lot of data, numbers, benchmarks and comparing with pricing etc. Looking like we've got a E5-2687Wv3 coming, so we'll see how things go!


    Still need to decide on a case and a few other things when I get back later this evening :)

  • @ellnic


    Yes ambient and drive temperature is very important. My fancontrol takes care that CPU should not exceed 80°C under full load (77°C - thats 1h transcoding 2 streams at 100% on all 4 cores).


    Get a case that allows decent airflow with a fan control attached to the drives AND the bottom of the CPU cooler (underside where no airflow is) - so you can spin up the case fans when HDD temperature or CPU rises independent from each other -7200rpm drives generate quite some heat! (Sadly my HDDs do get quite hot as the Lian-Li Q25 isn't designed good.)


    If noise is an issue, the company Noiseblocker makes very good fans.

  • which hard drives are you going to use?


    sorry, I know that this thread is not for hard drives...I'm just curious..


    This is where some might think I am being a little odd. Seagate ST4000DM000's.


    This is because:


    1. 5900RPM... low power but decentish performance.
    2. Lower heat output bearing in mind the smaller case I'll probably use
    3. I already have 5 of them so I don't need to buy many more (I prefer not to mix models)
    4. I can get them for £90 each
    5. Working in a RAIDZ2, the lower spin speeds shouldn't impact performance [too much (for my use)].


    Ideally I would need 10 for the RAIDZ2, but I might use 8. I have spent a bit more already than my initial projections so I need to cut costs. I know I'm probably going to get some comments on this, but I have been informed that after 6 x drives in a RAIDZ2, the performance doesn't suffer noticeably for home users. Whilst some say it's ideal to use 4, 6, 10, 18 etc for this (2^x + p) I have been told it doesn't matter too much beyond 6 [for home use at least]


    This will give us 24TB with double parity. My current server only has 4TB used.


    When we need more space, way down the line - I will consider 7200s.



    Thanks for the fan recommenation. The server will be in a separate room to any of the TV's etc but I always like to keep noise down if I can. I was actually considering the Lian Li, but your feedback is pushing me back towards the Node 804... plus the Node 804 is only £75 :P

  • Thanks for the fan recommenation. The server will be in a separate room to any of the T'V's etc but I always like to keep noise down if I can. I was actually considering the Lian Li, but your feedback is pushing me back towards the Node 804... plus the Node 804 is only £75


    Since you are using slower spinning drives you will probably be fine especially if your ambient room temp. is lower than mine (which is very likely). I had WD REDs before which spin at 5700rpm and they ran 5-8°C cooler.

  • In the HP, the ST4000DM000's never get above 38c. Although I do think the cooling in the N54L is pretty decent for a quiet budget unit. What temp do your drives run at? Aren't Reds variable speed?

  • Wow....E5!!


    For the drives, I guess only a strong fan will help, try the Noctua fans, they are good!


    They make clicking/deep humming noises no matter if pwm or analogue.
    I have tried every majour manufacturer of fans (honestly I had almost a 60) over the last 5 years and Noiseblocker were by far the best.


    Btw: if anyone wants 140mm enermax with temp sensor send me a pm I have 2 of them :-)

  • Looking into fans at the moment, then have PSU to decide on. Have just ordered the Corsair H105, because it will JUST fit :D YAY


    Would welcome PSU recommendations. 8 x drives + OS 2.5 Drive (~30w each) and the Xeon (160w) plus others, probably comes to about 450-480w - I'm thinking a 500w for breathing room. Maybe I should go for 550w. These figures are rough - please chime in! :)


    The hardware so far:


    Xeon E5-2687Wv3
    ASRock X99M Extreme 4
    Fractal Node 804
    32GB DDR4-2133 RDIMMs (2 x 16GB)
    8 x Seagate ST4000DM000's (Still need to order 3)
    Corsair H105 for the Xeon


    Need to order:


    PSU
    Cables
    LED Fans


    Already have:


    MX4 Paste :-)
    Coffee
    Music
    Patience

  • Hi


    30w for each HDD is too much, most have below 10w and just need more when they spin up.
    Since you go for a server board you will have staggered spin up wich will releave stress on the PSU when powering up.


    For power calculation there is the "extreme outer vision PSU calc" . Go for any Platinum PSU which has good efficiency below 50w - that's where you will be with disks spun down. Seasonic are pretty good an reliable.

Participate now!

Don’t have an account yet? Register yourself now and be a part of our community!