just a rant and some advise if you have some

  • so i have been running omv for years, seems about every 2 to 3 years some hardware dies. mostly hard drives (my fault for not backing settings up)

    i did backup omv 6 this time.

    well i put omv 6 on new setup, bought for omv.

    well about 2 years in i was having drive problems, i waited to long (real busy at work) and have now decided to install omv 7 on a flash drive. easier to clone and recover (i hope).

    as it turns out it might be my motherboard and it's sata connections.

    i have bought new sata cables and only 3 sata ports show drives in the bios.

    so i did continue setting up omv 7 and to my surprise i'm able to just copy my yml into the new docker file and install most ymls without issue. using the same drive i setup from my old setup (luckly my data drive from om6 is showing in the bios and omv7).

    my rant is this what hardware should i use to have it last more than 2 to 3 years? or is it expected to have something fail? i use the server alot, movies, tv shows, nextcloud, ext. plus relie on it for my business.

    are my expectations to high?

    i'm about to go out and buy another setup and not sure what direction to go.

    i love and have come so used to using omv not sure i could live without it.

    • Official Post

    my rant is this what hardware should i use to have it last more than 2 to 3 years? or is it expected to have something fail?

    What hardware are you running? My primary server is 8 years old with 8 year old hard drives. I do have backups. You can definitely get hardware that will last longer than 2-3 years but I would plan to do a hardware upgrade every 5-6 years (yes I am working on it myself lol).

    omv 7.1.0-2 sandworm | 64 bit | 6.8 proxmox kernel

    plugins :: omvextrasorg 7.0 | kvm 7.0.13 | compose 7.2 | k8s 7.1.0-3 | cputemp 7.0.1 | mergerfs 7.0.5 | scripts 7.0.7


    omv-extras.org plugins source code and issue tracker - github - changelogs


    Please try ctrl-shift-R and read this before posting a question.

    Please put your OMV system details in your signature.
    Please don't PM for support... Too many PMs!

    • Official Post

    my last system was an asus intel board with an i5 and 32 gigs of ram with adata ssd 128. system drive.

    That should easily last longer than 3 years unless the cooling is bad. I have a couple of 13+ year old Dell servers that would boot right up.

    omv 7.1.0-2 sandworm | 64 bit | 6.8 proxmox kernel

    plugins :: omvextrasorg 7.0 | kvm 7.0.13 | compose 7.2 | k8s 7.1.0-3 | cputemp 7.0.1 | mergerfs 7.0.5 | scripts 7.0.7


    omv-extras.org plugins source code and issue tracker - github - changelogs


    Please try ctrl-shift-R and read this before posting a question.

    Please put your OMV system details in your signature.
    Please don't PM for support... Too many PMs!

  • That should easily last longer than 3 years unless the cooling is bad. I have a couple of 13+ year old Dell servers that would boot right up.

    stock cpu cooler, but case has 5 fans.

    next build is going to be amd.

    how much trouble would it be to migrate my docker folders to a new drive? going to change that to a ssd.

    would it be as simple as changing the uuid in my ymls?

  • I ran my first OMV server in a makeshift case on a Pentium 3 and a board taken from a throwaway HP Vectra.



    Picture cca 2013. I still have an OMV server today on a Core Q9650 with DDR2. I've never had anything fail apart from HDDs and power supplies.

    • Official Post

    my last system was an asus intel board with an i5 and 32 gigs of ram with adata ssd 128. system drive.


    my rant is this what hardware should i use to have it last more than 2 to 3 years? or is it expected to have something fail?

    If you built the server yourself, from components, you've got to be careful about potential ESD damage. "Touching" the mobo's chip legs and solder points is a No-No. While some of the latest hardware has some ESD protection built into it, it's still possible to "zap" sensitive chips and you may not notice it. It doesn't take much.


    During assembly, it's best to use a grounded static cuff. Without a cuff, at the minimum, first ground yourself on the case chassis and handle the motherboard and it's various plugin components (memory, etc.) at their edges when installing them.

Participate now!

Don’t have an account yet? Register yourself now and be a part of our community!