Folders on the NAS (NTFS) via SMB.

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    I have configured access to folders on the NAS via SMB. HDD is formatted via NTFS. Through Double Commander and Total Commander on my computer, I can go to folders. Through the Windows Explorer, they do not let me in the folders and ask for the user's password. I have no users, only admin. I can also go to folders from my phone and tablet on Android without a password. Why can't I go to folders through Windows Explorer on my computer?
  • There are numerous variables in your question.


    HDD is formatted via NTFS

    This is another wild card. If your server is Linux (Posix permissions) attaching an NTFS formatted drive that was formatted on Windows machine (with Windows permissions) has the potential for odd effects and permissions incompatibilities. If you want to use Linux, in a server role, it's best to let the server format attached storage drives, using a drive format native to Linux like EXT4.

  • If your server is Linux (Posix permissions) attaching an NTFS formatted drive that was formatted on Windows machine (with Windows permissions) had the potential for odd effects and permissions incompatibilities.

    First, I don't mean by any chance, hijack this thread, just give some input.


    Have been searching the forum for questions on the SAMBA area, mainly connecting external shared folders of other running OS (Linux, Windows, whatever) to the OMV with "remote mount" plugin and until now, never saw something that give me a pointer of WHY I'm unable to connect it from another Linux running device.


    And this hits the spot of, why I'm can't mount a share due to my case scenario (that looks exactly what you say above---^^^^):


    My OMV is on a RPi4, with a 500Gb USB hdd that was formatted with ext4 when I installed the "Raspbian" and the OMV4 (at that time) that has it's shares (I can find them on W10 via hostname on the "Network" with "File Explorer".


    I also have another RPi4 running official LibreELEC (9.2.6) to serve as a media player on my TV. The LibreELEC runs KODI and I attached, at that time, a 1.5Tb USB hdd that I had as my media disk (formatted as NTFS and used on W10).

    LibreELEC runs SAMBA out of the box and creates shares of all folders it has (backup, config, downloads, update, etc....) and also the root folder of the USB disk.


    But, no matter how I try it, I can't hook those shares with OMV (tried all I know and heard here on the forum and different "remote mount" configurations) but nada.


    TL,DR: On W10 the share shows as "\\192.168.1.250" (show all the folders shared on the LibreELEC) and "\\192.168.1.250\Files" (shows the root of the 1.5Tb USB hdd with NTFS)


    Does this gives you any idea how I can fix/hook those shares on OMV or, last case scenario will be, backup all disk and format it on ext4?!?


    P.S.: sorry OP, for dropping my problem here, :saint:

  • Have been searching the forum for questions on the SAMBA area, mainly connecting external shared folders of other running OS (Linux, Windows, whatever) to the OMV with "remote mount" plugin and until now, never saw something that give me a pointer of WHY I'm unable to connect it from another Linux running device.


    Have you seen this? -> Remote Mount. For server to server access, as noted in the doc, setting up a specific user on the remote device, with the access needed, simplifies things somewhat. (Otherwise, use the administrative account and password.) There's also a permissions doc on the same site, for working with Permissions in OMV's GUI, that might be of help.

    In your case, if you want to "mount" a remote share as if it's local to OMV AND manipulate it using Remote Mount, you'd need username and password for a user that has write access on the remote server or client. However, this may not be the best way to access the network share. If OMV is used as a "proxy" for a network share that's somewhere else, data will transit the network twice - once to OMV, then onward from OMV to the client.

  • you'd need username and password for a user that has write access on the remote server or client. ...

    Thank you for the links.

    I had a look before and tried too many options before I gave up.


    What made me think this through, was when you wrote about the issues with permissions with NTFS created files:

    attaching an NTFS formatted drive that was formatted on Windows machine (with Windows permissions) has the potential for odd effects and permissions incompatibilities.

    Since it's hooked on a stripped Linux running machine (LibreELEC), I think it's the reason I'm unable to connect to it. (unless I go ALL IN and use root login, ?()


    But after thinking about it, I tried to hook the shares via Nextcloud "External Storage App" (main reason I wanted it available on the OMV) and it showed immediately. (:love:)


    So, in the end, I now have the share that I need (Files on the USB hdd of the LibreELEC) available mainly to access the media while abroad.


    If OMV is used as a "proxy" for a network share that's somewhere else, data will transit the network twice - once to OMV, then onward from OMV to the client.


    Yeah, using OMV as "proxy" (in my case scenario) would be somewhat, a waist of bandwidth, X/


    Thank you for the tips and input, ;)

  • There are numerous variables in your question.


    This is another wild card. If your server is Linux (Posix permissions) attaching an NTFS formatted drive that was formatted on Windows machine (with Windows permissions) has the potential for odd effects and permissions incompatibilities. If you want to use Linux, in a server role, it's best to let the server format attached storage drives, using a drive format native to Linux like EXT4.

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    What is the difference between using Explorer and Double Commander under Windows? Access does not work with Explorer, with Double Commander access to folders. Why should I format in EXT4?
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    Why should I format in EXT4

    In OMV WebGUI, storage section, use + <- plus sing to format your disk/pools

  • What is the difference between using Explorer and Double Commander under Windows? Access does not work with Explorer, with Double Commander access to folders.

    The difference may be in the connection security protocols and what, specifically, is allowed. But, this issue probably (I'm speculating) doesn't have anything to do with that. This may be something like Windows security and network settings, or plain vanilla permissions issues. Those possibilities are more likely.


    Why should I format in EXT4?

    Because access to files and folders is completely different between Windows (which uses ACL's) and Linux Posix permissions (which uses Owner / Group / Other). OMV (a Linux Server) understands Owner / Group / Other, but when it comes to "translating" Posix permissions into Window's version of ACL's (on an NTFS drive), the potential for issues is high. There is no way to translate permissions, transparently, with an NTFS formatted drive connected to a Linux server.


    The best and cleanest way for Linux to accommodated Windows files and folders, is with a server formatted disk (native Linux formats) and a Samba network share. Samba acts as the translator, storing Windows file and folder attributes.

    ______________________________________________________


    If you want your Windows workstation to connect to the network share seamlessly, take a look at this -> Permissions document. Otherwise an insecure short cut is to go to:

    - Access Rights Management, Shared Folders, click on a share, then the ACL button. Set Others to Read/Write/Execute, turn the Recursive button ON, then click Apply. (Others - Write is the Windows equivalent of Everyone- Write.)- Then go to Services, SMB/CIF, the Shares Tab. Click on a share and the Edit Button. Set Public to Guests Allowed.


    If Windows won't connect with the above permissions profile, which is wide open, see this -> Doc.

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