Doubts about shared folders / SMB / Firmware Update

  • Hello :)


    Very soon i will start using OMV on an Odroid HC2. Here are a some of things i do not understand properly:


    1- To see my shared folders from windows i need to first create the shared folders in OMV and then enable SAMBA. Right?


    2- As per is not a good idea to share SAMBA folders on the internet i imagine that the user settings for the shared folders accesses are valid only locally, inside the LAN. Right? I'm the only one accessing it so which persmissions should i set? I imagine i have to create only one user for me, with read and write permissions.


    3- This is connected to the first question. I want to start a docker container with a torrent client. Now, i will have for example, a folder called 'Downloads'. But what if i want to download the files in separate subfolders of 'Download'? I should create every shared subfolder from the GUI, as done for 'Downloads', or i can create them from Windows directly?


    4- I read this thread https://forum.openmediavault.o…id-HC2-HDD-and-questions/ . Reading it i have some doubts:


    4a: How to disable the power management of OMV?


    4b: How to flash the update firmware with the 30' spindown setting? I need it? @Adoby did it because of issue with his 12TB Ironwolf. What about a 4TB Ironwolf? Should the firmware be updated anyway?


    4c: Is suggested to not have the docker base path on the SD card. How can i set this?



    I know these are a lot of questions but thanks for anyone who will help me understand! :)

  • 1. Yes.
    2. Yes. Set your one user to read/write.
    3. Once your main SAMBA shares are set up, create sub folders directly from Windows.
    4a. Just leave the setting alone. It is disabled by default.
    4b. This is @Adoby’s specialty.
    4c. There is a field to specify the path in the Docker plugin (OMV4) or in OMV-Extras (OMV5).

    Simple and sure backup and restore: In a Scheduled Job: rsync -av --delete /srv/dev-disk-by-label-SOURCE/ /srv/dev-disk-by-label-DESTINATION/ (HT: Getting Started with OMV5)
    OMV Version: Ver. 5 (current) - Hardware: NanoPi M4, Nextcloud, Plex, Airsonic, Booksonic, Calibre, & Heimdall - Acer Aspire T180, backup - Odroid XU4, Pi-Hole (DietPi) - Testing/Playing: hc2, xu4, Pi 3B+, Odroid H2, and HP dx2400, Debian 10 XFCE.

  • I recommend flashing the firmware for the USB/SATA bridge. Then you can specify a sane spindown time. Otherwise it will be just a few minutes, causing the drive to spin up/down all the time. I currently have my spindown set to 120 minutes.


    Whatever you do, don't try to change any physical disk properties for the HDD in the OMV GUI. OMV uses hdparm to set things like power management and spindown time. And it seems hdparm is incompatible with some HDDs. For instance Ironwolf. I learnt that the hard way...


    Early firmware caused some strange clicking noise and possibly caused some drives to age prematurely, according to SMART values. Updating the firmware fixed that as well, but I think this is already fixed on new HC2s. Still, if you flash the firmware for the spindown time, it will also update the firmware.


    Typically you have a router between the OMV server and the internet. Unless you configure the router otherwise the OMV server can only be accessed locally. Not from the internet. So no worries.


    Details on flashing the firmware is on the Odroid wiki.


    https://wiki.odroid.com/odroid-xu4/software/jms578_fw_update


    Regarding the docker base path. Create a shared folder only for the docker base path on the HDD. I call mine "docker". Then, before you add any dockers, set the docker base path in the OMV docker GUI.

    Be smart - be lazy. Clone your rootfs.
    OMV 5: 9 x Odroid HC2 + 1 x Odroid HC1 + 1 x Raspberry Pi 4

  • Please read first the guide section, specially the technodad videos to understand most of your questions:


    https://forum.openmediavault.org/index.php/Board/29-Guides/

  • Not to forget, the Samba shares still need to be set up then. :)

    I'm not sure what you mean exactly. I create a shared folder, enable samba for that sharedfolder. Then i can create subfolders for that sharedfolders directly from Windows. Right?
    Or i have to create a shared folder from OMV gui for also all the subfolders i create from windows?


    I was thinking to create a shared folder pointing to "/" and then create there my subfolders directly from windows, for ease.

  • I'm not sure what you mean exactly. I create a shared folder, enable samba for that sharedfolder.

    I think we both mean the same thing. For me "enable Samba" means enabling the Samba service in OMV at all. Then as a next step a Samba share hast to be created on top of a shared folder of OMV. I assume this is meant by you with "enable samba for that sharedfolder".

    OMV 3.0.99 (Gray style)
    ASRock Rack C2550D4I C0-stepping - 16GB ECC - 6x WD RED 3TB (ZFS 2x3 Striped RaidZ1)- Fractal Design Node 304

  • It is bad practice—you should not create a shared folder pointing to "/"

    Simple and sure backup and restore: In a Scheduled Job: rsync -av --delete /srv/dev-disk-by-label-SOURCE/ /srv/dev-disk-by-label-DESTINATION/ (HT: Getting Started with OMV5)
    OMV Version: Ver. 5 (current) - Hardware: NanoPi M4, Nextcloud, Plex, Airsonic, Booksonic, Calibre, & Heimdall - Acer Aspire T180, backup - Odroid XU4, Pi-Hole (DietPi) - Testing/Playing: hc2, xu4, Pi 3B+, Odroid H2, and HP dx2400, Debian 10 XFCE.

  • Typically shared folders appear as subfolders on a data drive.


    And yes, unless you have specific requirements, just create one shared folder. Share it with SMB/CIFS. And create subfolders from the client. No need to complicate things unnecessarily. (If you only use Linux, you may want to use NFS instead of SMB/CIFS.)


    I have named my HC2 OMV NAS simply "nas0", "nas1" and so on. And the shared folders on each NAS exactly the same; "nas0", "nas1" and so on. And then subfolders in the shared folder for different purposes.


    Relax and do some experiments. Expect to reinstall a couple of times, and try different variants, before your mind and OMV syncs.


    And then, after perhaps 5-6 months regular use of OMV, you will finally figure out exactly how you should have done it from the start. For your specific needs. If you have a good working backup system you can the easily reinstall from scratch AGAIN, and restore from backups.

    Be smart - be lazy. Clone your rootfs.
    OMV 5: 9 x Odroid HC2 + 1 x Odroid HC1 + 1 x Raspberry Pi 4

    Edited 2 times, last by Adoby ().

  • Details on flashing the firmware is on the Odroid wiki.
    https://wiki.odroid.com/odroid-xu4/software/jms578_fw_update


    Thanks! I'm not sure i understand the process properly. So i do not have to download the "standard binary F/W file", but the "JMS578 F/W updater" from the "How to use" section?



    So i have to:


    Basically decompress the archive, and then issue this:

    Code
    root@odroid:~# ./JMS578FwUpdate -d /dev/sda -f ./JMS578-Hardkenel-Release-v173.01.00.02-20190306.bin -b ./backup.bin -t 5
    Update Firmware file name: ./JMS578-Hardkenel-Release-v173.01.00.02-20190306.bin
    Backup Firmware file name: ./backup.bin
    Auto spin-down timer: 5 min.
    Backup the ROM code successfully.
    Programming & Compare Success!!
    root@odroid:~#


    I suppose i should replace "/dev/sda" with the directory of my drive right? And change "5" with "120".

  • Yes. Use JMS578 F/W updater.


    Your drive is /dev/sda. Use that!


    A drive must be present for the reflash to work. Since there can only be one SATA drive in a HC2, it is always /dev/sda


    Yes. 120 if you want 120 minutes spindown.


    Note: You must cold boot afterwards. Unplug the power for a few minutes.

    Be smart - be lazy. Clone your rootfs.
    OMV 5: 9 x Odroid HC2 + 1 x Odroid HC1 + 1 x Raspberry Pi 4

  • Thank you for all the infos! :D
    Maybe this is stupid but i do not understand why in the guide, first the compressed archive is decompressed, then the dir is accessed "root@odroid:~/jms578fwupdater#"


    But then the command to install the update/check version are issued from "root@odroid:~#".


    For example -> root@odroid:~# ./JMS578FwUpdate -d /dev/sda -v



    Why?

  • Linux has built in protection against running programs by mistake. Or evil intentions.


    In order to run a program or a script you need to either specify the path or place the progam/script in a folder that is listed in $PATH.


    You can check your $PATH by typing:


    echo $PATH


    So if you unpack the firmware and cd into the folder, you can't just type the name of the updater to start it. You must add the path.


    There are (at least) three ways to add the path to execute a program.


    1. You can type in the full path:


    /this/is/the/path/program


    2. You can say it is in the current working directory, CWD. You do this by adding the relative path to CWD to the command. And the relative path to the CWD is a single point. .. The relative path to the parent of the CWD is two points. ... You have most likely seen these paths in file listings sometimes.


    ./program


    3. If you happen to work in your home folder, then there is a shortcut relative path for that as well. A tilde. ~. In the listing it seems they are logged in as root and CWD is /root. Then you can use:


    ~/program


    By default only the user root has a home folder in OMV. It is /root. But it is possible to configure OMV to use home folders for other users as well. Typically they are then added as subfolders under /home.


    The nice thing about using these shortcuts in instructions is that they stay the same even if a different user tries to use them. So they are often also used for specifying folders in instructions and scripts. But it might have been a little better and less confusing if they were more consistent and didn't use different shortcuts.


    The shortcuts can be combined. So ../.. is the parent folder of the parent folder.


    But then you wouldn't get to learn about Linux protection against running programs by mistake and the path shortcuts . = current folder, .. = parent folder, and ~ = home folder.

    Be smart - be lazy. Clone your rootfs.
    OMV 5: 9 x Odroid HC2 + 1 x Odroid HC1 + 1 x Raspberry Pi 4

    Edited once, last by Adoby ().

  • Yes, provided you first cd into that folder to make it CWD. It is not enough that the program is in a subfolder to CWD. Then you have to specify the sub folder as a relative path:


    subfolder/program


    or:


    ./subfolder/program


    or, if program is in a subfolder to your home folder:


    ~/subfolder/program

    Be smart - be lazy. Clone your rootfs.
    OMV 5: 9 x Odroid HC2 + 1 x Odroid HC1 + 1 x Raspberry Pi 4

    Edited once, last by Adoby ().

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