Any suggestions/feedback to move from OMV to Synology? HD's ok to plug into new Hardware?

  • OMV, it has been a great run over 4 years, but I decided to retire from manually babysitting, updating it. I also think some issues I have had were related to my hardware. So in any case, I was able to jump in on a Black Friday Synology deal, so my question is.....


    Is it easy just to pop in the Hard Drives into the new Synology system? They both read the same format (OMV & Synology)? Any other feedback/tips/suggestions while I make this move and try to retain my media?


    11/26 PM edit: Reason to go to Synology, I turned lazy and need to stop fiddling w/ updates/permissions etc. swappable HD's sounds appealing, auto updates, etc. I'm turning into some1 who wants a pretty UI, etc. I want to get away from the techi-ness and go more simple..... maybe

  • Is it easy just to pop in the Hard Drives into the new Synology system? They both read the same format (OMV & Synology)? Any other feedback/tips/suggestions while I make this move and try to retain my media?

    have a backup, never asume a smooth transition

  • Do you want to reuse the drives or reuse the data?


    The first should be easy, for the second you can give it a try, but be prepared the fiddle with permissions and move directories.

    If it doesn't work, Synology will have a way to reformat the drives and than restore from a backup.


    I haven`t seen a Synology box for more than 8 years

    If you got help in the forum and want to give something back to the project click here and write up your solution for others.

  • My advice is to return that synology box if there is still time, and exchange it for good hardware for OMV, what is the point of changing OMV for DSM? The logical process is to progress from DSM to OMV. ^^

    But if you go ahead, the only way I can think of is to insert a blank disk to start DSM (DSM writes the S.O. on every disc). When it is already started try to add the disks with data, and see how DSM responds. Most likely it won't work. A backup is essential, DSM may erase everything before you know it.

  • In fact, I'm pretty sure it's not going to work. DSM is a very closed and demanding system. To start the server you need at least one blank disk to write the S.O. So you are already losing a bay. If the NAS has 4 bays and you only want to fit 3 disks, you can still give it a try. It is also necessary to consult the list of compatible disks for each server model. Not all models support the same discs. If you use an unsupported model, it won't take long to cause problems. Also, DSM will likely default format any drive added to the NAS unless it has already been in another synology.

    I don't want to discourage anyone, but I think it's a waste of time trying this.

    I have had two synology servers for many years. After trying OMV, I won't go back to Synology (or Qnap) even if they give it to me. I would try to install OMV on them :)

  • Five answers in the OMV forums regarding the migration from OMV to Synology.


    Maybe we should redirect questions regarding OMV to the synology support to see if they compete. ;)

    If you got help in the forum and want to give something back to the project click here and write up your solution for others.

  • lol, thanks all. good feedback. I did buy from Amazon which allows free returns, I am still on the fence.


    Reason to go to Synology, I turned lazy and need to stop fiddling w/ updates/permissions etc. swappable HD's sounds appealing, auto updates, etc. I'm turning into some1 who wants a pretty UI, etc. I want to get away from the techi-ness and go more simple..... maybe

  • lol, thanks all. good feedback. I did buy from Amazon which allows free returns, I am still on the fence.


    Reason to go to Synology, I turned lazy and need to stop fiddling w/ updates/permissions etc. swappable HD's sounds appealing, auto updates, etc. I'm turning into some1 who wants a pretty UI, etc. I want to get away from the techi-ness and go more simple..... maybe

    If your fiddling that much, then this is likely a user issue, not an OMV issue. Beyond adding or downloading new media, the only thing I do on my system is run updates once or twice a week, which you should be doing on a Synology as well. Been that way for at least a couple years.. unless I was intentionally doing something (trying a new container a vast majority of the time)


    Initial setup is the only "tech" part of OMV vs Synology.


    I like OMV's UI and find it more or less painless to set up.

    Air Conditioners are a lot like PC's... They work great until you open Windows.


  • If your fiddling that much, then this is likely a user issue, not an OMV issue. Beyond adding or downloading new media, the only thing I do on my system is run updates once or twice a week, which you should be doing on a Synology as well. Been that way for at least a couple years.. unless I was intentionally doing something (trying a new container a vast majority of the time)


    Initial setup is the only "tech" part of OMV vs Synology.


    I like OMV's UI and find it more or less painless to set up.

    My SAB is way outdated, but still works. Emby needs an update. My OMV itself is outdated as well. I need to WinSCP in to update Emby + Sab, but i sorta have to research how to do it to remind myself. things like this. Yes I agree, user issue, hence the reason I admit I'm lazy looking for an easier way if Synology solves that, but....


    Generally speaking is there a way SAB and Emby will self/auto update? Maybe I should consider spending time (instead of money) updating my OMV and sorting all these User issues.


    I'm like 75% convinced to go to Synology, but I still have an appreciation for OMV. I might consider staying. (sorry this forum is turning into my indecisiveness)

  • How out of date is omv. Again, it sounds like a user issue if you're talking about needing to update, etc and are way out of date.


    Probably best you move on if that's you're issue but I can't see how failing to do timely updates, etc. Won't also be a problem on Synology

    Air Conditioners are a lot like PC's... They work great until you open Windows.


  • Generally speaking is there a way SAB and Emby will self/auto update? Maybe I should consider spending time (instead of money) updating my OMV and sorting all these User issues.

    That is a fantastic approach. It is possible that finally this thread is really useful :)

    Doing a clean install and configuring the applications you need with current programs shouldn't be difficult if you've already been using OMV for years.

    I don't know what SAB is, but as a media server you could try Jellyfin. If you have not spent time on this, you probably do not know its existence.

    For automatic updates you have Watchtower.

    And here is a guide in case you have questions with docker. Maybe you are still with OMV4 using the plugin. [How to] Prepare OMV to install docker applications

  • A thought so you know what you are doing.

    What Synology (or Qnap) does is develop software for a specific platform. They do an S.O. customized for each model they sell. The advantage of this is that they can fine-tune it, because they know the hardware. So what they do always works. The downside is that you can only use their software. They implement an application for each use, and you can only use that application, there is no more. You only have one way of doing things, whether you like it or not.

    If you want to install Jellyfin, or Nextcloud, or Wireguard, or many others, you have no choice but to start using docker, if the NAS allows it, not all of them do. You are back to the same as in OMV, but also with the limitations of Synology, using docker in Synology is not as easy as in OMV. If you want to do a remote backup to another Synology system it will be easy (after reading the 27 pages of its manual, and understanding them), but if the other system is not Synology it will be very complicated. Anything outside of Synology's circle is difficult or impossible to do and Synology's circle is small.

    You will be forever limited to that hardware you purchased.

    If you have two bays and you want to expand storage, you can only change the drives for larger ones. The disks you take out you can no longer use them because you don't have any more bays.

    If you want to buy a disk drive you will have to check the list and see which one your NAS supports. Not all work.

    If you need more RAM you will have to buy the memory that they say, in case your NAS allows to expand it, not all allow it.

    If you want to change the NIC, more USB ports, or any other expansion card, you probably won't be able to. Only if you spend a fortune on a professional range NAS, outside of the home environment.

    If you want a faster CPU you will not be able to upgrade it.

    You will only be happy if you are willing to limit your hardware and applications to what Synology offers you. You will have to sacrifice all that in exchange for a system that is already configured (not quite) the first day.

    With OMV you will have to dedicate an initial time to the first configuration. Being an open system, it supports almost any hardware and any application. This requires a bit of initial setup. Once passed, you will have the same functions that Synology offers you, but you will have adapted these functions to your real needs, you will also have the freedom to use and expand the hardware you want and use or modify the applications you want.

    Over time on a Synology NAS there comes a time when you are always missing something. A disk drive that you have in a drawer that you cannot use. A need that you cannot cover with its applications. There is no way Synology can compete with an open system like OMV, where you can configure almost anything.

    Using a commercial NAS is more comfortable (at first), you don't have to think, but stay there, don't think. If you start thinking, it will no longer serve you.

    My first NAS was a two-bay Synology. When my storage ran out I didn't want to change the drives, it seemed stupid to have two 4TB drives in a drawer. So I swapped the NAS for a 4-bay one and bought two more drives. In a matter of 3 years or so I refilled the discs. At that time I was already starting to be fed up with not being able to use many applications that I saw on the internet. So I ended up trying OMV with a forgotten computer. It has been the best decision in many years. It took me a few months (making time from time to time) to replace everything I had on the Synology NAS with applications in OMV. I have also been able to choose the applications that I liked the most. And when I put the Synology NAS up for sale second-hand I was happy.

    Now I have another server with OMV mounted at my parents' house, every night it is backed up there from my house. It also helps them to watch movies. I have not wasted money because I have reused hardware that I had in a closet. All this with Synology is unthinkable.

    If you are not comfortable with the command line and you do not want complications in OMV configure an easy system. Please don't install OMV6, wait for it to be well tested, OMV5 will remain functional in the meantime. Use conventional hardware, do not use ARM platforms, you will avoid added complications, usually configuration and power. Try to follow the official documentation to configure the file systems in the simplest way. EXT4 format. Share with Samba. Use the OMV plugins to cover the needs you can, they will not fail. For other uses look for common and proven applications that many people use, look for guides in the forum. If you configure a system with the simplest options and following the documentation you should not have any problems. You will have the same that Synology or Qnap can offer you. And also the possibility of improving it if you want.

    If you are concerned about the size of the box, look for a small box oriented to NAS with several 3.5 "bays and with space for a MiniITX board. If you are concerned about consumption, look for a processor similar to those of Synology or Qnap. They are only used for that, to copy hardware :) A celeron processor should be used for most uses and has a minimum consumption.

    I can't think of any reason to yearn for the latest Synology NAS I had.

  • A thought so you know what you are doing.

    Thanks for the write-up. well written, hopefully you copy-pasted that from somewhere and didn't write just for me. if you did, then awesome, and save that text, very useful for ppl like me in similar situation. All are great valid points, definitely re-considering now.

  • Thanks for the write-up. well written, hopefully you copy-pasted that from somewhere and didn't write just for me. if you did, then awesome, and save that text, very useful for ppl like me in similar situation. All are great valid points, definitely re-considering now.

    I wrote it for you, and for everyone looking for this information in the forum. I do not need to save it, it is already saved in the forum, it will last for many years. ;)

  • I've just gone the other way. From Synology to OMV. I had already started moving away from Synology apps to docker based applications. Emby/plex/resilio are all out of date in the App Store so you need to download them manually for latest, so why not just use docker. The photo's app had weird permission issues and twice started using 100% CPU for no reason, I had to SSH into the system to fix it after lots of google-fu. So why not just use OMV command line?


    The built in OpenVPN won't let you use more secure certs, so you need to use command lines to enable this. Actually this is something that OMV does easier. I used the command line to use Wireguard anyway, which is easier on OMV.


    The built in docker tool isn't as powerful as Portainer so I moved to that anyway. Also my synology uses a very old kernel (3.10) so newer docker images don't work on it.


    Synology is excellent for a simple home user, but once you want to do something advanced you will need to do things manually and you will need command line. So I'd rather do this for free on better hardware than pay Synology for the privilege.

    Former Xpenology user moved to OMV 5.x with ZFS.

    HP Microserver Gen8 - 16GB RAM - 1x 32GB USB - 1x 480 GB SSD - 4x 16TB Exos (Shucked) / ZFS - OMV 5.x bare metal

    HP Microserver Gen7 N54L - 8GB RAM - 1x 32GB USB - 1x 240 GB SSD - 4x 4TB / ZFS - OMV 5.x bare metal

  • I moved from Qnap to Synology to OMV. Wouldn't go back the other way at all. I actually find setting up Synology harder. I currently have extra hardware, and am running Xpenology, and I have to force myself to learn because so often I find myself thinking "why am I torturing myself?" Every once in a while I'll remember "Oh, I haven't logged into my OMV in quite a while", and then I will, and do updates.


    So, be sure if you want to downgrade from OMV to a Synology.


    In answer to your question, "NO, you will not be able to save any of your data on the hard disks" as Synology will wipe all the disks when it initializes.

  • So, be sure if you want to downgrade from OMV to a Synology.


    In answer to your question, "NO, you will not be able to save any of your data on the hard disks" as Synology will wipe all the disks when it initializes.

    I'm not doubting you (I have no idea)... but if that's the case... that is freaking ridiculous.

    Air Conditioners are a lot like PC's... They work great until you open Windows.


  • I'm not doubting you (I have no idea)... but if that's the case... that is freaking ridiculous.

    Just to be clear. Synology won't wipe any disks unless you tell it to, however you won't be able to use them until you do wipe them.

    Former Xpenology user moved to OMV 5.x with ZFS.

    HP Microserver Gen8 - 16GB RAM - 1x 32GB USB - 1x 480 GB SSD - 4x 16TB Exos (Shucked) / ZFS - OMV 5.x bare metal

    HP Microserver Gen7 N54L - 8GB RAM - 1x 32GB USB - 1x 240 GB SSD - 4x 4TB / ZFS - OMV 5.x bare metal

  • Just to be clear. Synology won't wipe any disks unless you tell it to, however you won't be able to use them until you do wipe them.

    LOL, well that's kind of a catch 22.. but still equally ridiculous.

    Air Conditioners are a lot like PC's... They work great until you open Windows.


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